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Shit Happening

jenkins · 59 · 4021

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jenkins

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Reply #45 on: December 21, 2020, 04:20:44 PM
Quote
Almodovar’s Best Films of 2020 list includes:

“First Cow”
“The Devil All the Time”
“Another Round”
“Swallow”
“I’m No Longer Here”
“Little Joe”
“Never, Rarely, Sometimes, Always”
“The Painter and the Thief”

what's funny to me is I was like, oh, The Devil All the Time isn't on any lists, hmm, but then birds of a feather


wilberfan

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Reply #46 on: December 21, 2020, 04:23:22 PM
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Almodovar’s Best Films of 2020 list includes:
“Never, Rarely, Sometimes, Always”

I liked that one, for whatever that's worth.
"Trying to fit in since 2017."


jenkins

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Reply #47 on: December 21, 2020, 04:41:21 PM
count it! lol. I haven't seen it! I want to because Beach Rats was really special to me. you know I want to admit that even i sometimes go into arthouse movies like, you know, unsure about what's ahead of me. then I thought Beach Rats was such a fully dimensional delight

I've seen so few 2020 movies. from what I've seen Jasper Mall has stuck with me the most. I'm such a fan of documentaries about normal people being normal people, like Hale County This Morning, This Evening and Minding the Gap and Only the Young and etc. obviously I need to also see Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets

but I'm not recommending Jasper Mall to you wbf. you won't like it and that's fine lol. I don't like slim narratives, I like completely absent narratives. I like the narrative to be a million fucking miles away


wilberfan

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Reply #48 on: December 21, 2020, 08:20:51 PM
I don't like slim narratives, I like completely absent narratives. I like the narrative to be a million fucking miles away

Thank you for sharing that.  It makes me feel....better...somehow.  Maybe just a little bit less of an outlier.

But I'm still waiting for my T-shirt.
"Trying to fit in since 2017."


jenkins

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Reply #49 on: December 21, 2020, 08:32:58 PM
you're definitely the majority of people my friend


wilberfan

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Reply #50 on: December 21, 2020, 08:50:28 PM
Ouch.   :yabbse-wink:
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jenkins

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Reply #51 on: December 21, 2020, 08:57:09 PM
you winked it but i'm a fringe salesman from a mile away, i mean that's me. and one sells the fringe to the masses, that's the situation. but you see i got this entire personal philosophy and you got a personal philosophy and we're just people in the end. I fucking love cats, dogs, sunrises, water fountains, jellybeans and gardens just like you do


wilberfan

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Reply #52 on: December 21, 2020, 10:28:43 PM
 :embrace:
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jenkins

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Reply #53 on: December 30, 2020, 01:37:24 PM


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“An Easy Girl” (“Une Fille Facile”), the new film by the French director Rebecca Zlotowski, borrows tropes, tones, and even a lead actress from reality TV. But it also looks behind the genre’s vulgar appeal—and the appeal of vulgarity—to locate the authentic substance that such spectacles demand and conceal. The film, which comes to Netflix on Thursday, reimagines the genre of a teen-age girl’s coming of age in the form of a tightly framed social experiment: she follows her much worldlier adult cousin into the social orbit of a rich older man and his yacht, and then she returns to her regular life. Moreover, Zlotowski crafts a distinctive style to distill and heighten the drama’s psychological complexities and societal analyses. No less than its young protagonists, the film dangerously brushes against the edge of modernity’s enticingly destructive glitz.

The film’s protagonist, Naïma (Mina Farid), is a high-school student, in Cannes, who lives with her mother (Loubna Abidar), a chambermaid at a nearby luxury hotel, in a modest apartment complex not far from the waterfront. She turns sixteen on the last day of school. When she gets home, she has a surprise: a visit from her twenty-two-year-old cousin, Sofia (Zahia Dehar), who has been living in Paris. Sofia is sexually candid and dripping with bling: she has jewelry, fancy clothing, and a Chanel handbag—and brings one for Naïma, too. In the evening, on the waterfront, Sofia and Naïma walk by a yacht that’s docked at the marina, and two middle-aged yachtsmen follow them to a nearby night club and invite them on board the boat. Naïma is scheduled for a summer internship, in the kitchen of the hotel where her mother works; she also has plans, with her best friend, Dodo (“Riley” Lakdhar Dridi), a classmate, to audition for acting school. Yet her pursuit of glamorous adventure threatens all of those plans. Over the next ten days, Naïma both consciously and naïvely follows Sofia into the high-finance, high-society whirl of brazen wealth and power and gets a heady apprenticeship in the ways of that cozy and cruel world—one that, for all its dangers, helps Naïma to see where she stands in relation to it, to see her path in life.

Dehar is one of France’s most prominent celebrities. She first came to public view in notoriety, in 2010—with a sex scandal involving some of France’s leading soccer players, who were accused of paying her for sex when she was seventeen. (The age of consent in France is fifteen—and even that is fluid—but prostitution is legal only at eighteen; the players were acquitted on the grounds that Dehar had claimed to be eighteen.) She then appeared on TV, became a model, and—with the help of Karl Lagerfeld and other fashion notables—launched, at the age of twenty, a line of designer lingerie. The casting of Dehar, in her first major acting role, is a coup de cinéma. Zlotowski grafts Dehar’s real-life energy, knowledge, and power into the film—and they’re embodied all the more movingly in her limpid, frank, and graceful performance. With her blend of worldliness and otherworldliness, bluntly practical candor and ethereal majesty, Dehar pairs tensely with the rough-edged modesty and shy sincerity of Farid, a nonprofessional actress, who plays Naïma pensively and brusquely, with an inescapable adolescent awkwardness, carrying the film ahead on a rush of newly concentrated and unleashed energy.

Zlotowski, who wrote the script with Teddy Lussi-Modeste, presents the story from the perspective of Naïma (she’s onscreen most of the time), whose voice-over narration lucidly punctuates the story with her insights and recollections. “An Easy Girl” is a tale of observation giving rise to action, of the spectator becoming a participant, which, in Zlotowski’s view, is the definition of a coming of age. What Naïma participates in—the workings of the world of business and money—is sketched with a scathing clarity. The yachtsmen whom the young women join are Andres (Nuno Lopes), a suavely bearded, guitar-playing, mightily wealthy Brazilian stock-market investor and art collector, and Philippe (Benoît Magimel), his art adviser, a sort of freelance cultural counsel who also functions as Andres’s paid companion and unofficial factotum (and whom Andres calls by the part-admiring, part-demeaning nickname of Socrates). Their yacht, when it’s docked, becomes a sort of theatre of luxury that local passersby watch, to Philippe’s embarrassment and Andres’s haughty contentment. When the two men meet up with Sofia and Naïma, the pairing off is obvious and automatic: Andres is pursuing Sofia for a sexual relationship, whereas Philippe becomes Naïma’s sort-of friend and sort-of mentor, even as more intimate possibilities loom.


jenkins

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Reply #54 on: January 05, 2021, 06:04:04 PM
Soderbergh's 2020 Seen, Read list makes it clear he spends ample time consuming culture as a way of life, so I can relate, and anyway there's To the Ends of the Earth at 12/23


WorldForgot

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Reply #55 on: January 05, 2021, 10:16:19 PM
Glad to know he also digz Below Deck, lol


jenkins

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Reply #56 on: February 09, 2021, 07:11:21 PM
these movies were recommended by the movie person during today's staff work meeting

The Old Guard (2020), Little Fish (2021), The Dig (2021)

I should give him wbf's email addy



wilberfan

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Reply #57 on: February 09, 2021, 07:46:12 PM
I should give him wbf's email addy

Wait, was that a shot:ponder:

I actually enjoyed The Dig.  Gave up on The Old Guard.  Hafta check out Little Fish.   :yabbse-grin:
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jenkins

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Reply #58 on: February 09, 2021, 07:56:06 PM
yeah I think he mentioned The Old Guard for like diversity. just in terms of I don't suspect it was genre related. Little Fish is Chad Hartigan so it has potential