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misc book thread

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jenkins

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Reply #120 on: April 28, 2021, 03:41:53 PM


situations have developed such that this book is in my hands now. or rather it is in my hands when I am not typing this. I was, admittedly, worried when going into it that it would decrease my appreciation for the author. because I am such a fan of the documentary. but reading this is paying off because of her interest in narrative mechanics. she is aware of what a story needs to feel alive, and thus reading this reminds me too


jenkins

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Reply #121 on: May 04, 2021, 08:03:32 PM


situations have developed such that this book is in my hands now. or rather it is in my hands when I am not typing this. I was, admittedly, worried when going into it that it would decrease my appreciation for the author. because I am such a fan of the documentary. but reading this is paying off because of her interest in narrative mechanics. she is aware of what a story needs to feel alive, and thus reading this reminds me too

it is in its own way a manifestation of the flight forward writing style, in which the emerging reality of a narrative is dictated by the terms of the writer. reality is up to the writer. flight forward is Aira's term for this but the book doesn't mimic the writing style of Aira, so all I can say for sure is it keeps you on its toes and is fun to read

I rewatched the similarly titled documentary and it held up nicely


jenkins

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Reply #122 on: May 06, 2021, 05:04:50 PM
it was cool to hang out with her. she calls her cat a nice person so it’s like


jenkins

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Reply #123 on: May 19, 2021, 07:50:15 PM
isolarii are island books—singular worlds, encapsulated. Together, they assemble disparate writers, artists, filmmakers and architects to help us navigate the world anew.”

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FROM THE EDITORS

The humanism of the past five hundred years is dead. Believing man was exceptional, it opened the abyss of extinction. A new approach is needed to re-enchant the world and establish the commonality of all life on Earth. This is not just the task of politics and philosophy. It requires the effort of all those who tear down convention in order to preserve what is meaningful. That is, the preservation not just of environments, but myth, irrationality, autonomy, and joy—whether by direct or poetic means. New islands—of thought, literature, art—are already emerging. They are the necessary minimum for this re-beginning. We find these points of orientation, mapping a scattered community that spans continents and disciplines. To represent a world of many worlds, not a globe.

Our books revive the extinct genre of the same name—the ‘island books’ that emerged at the start of the Renaissance. Bound together were poems, stories, and artworks—each a supposed island, a space that held a singular idea. Although this spatial form of literature was eclipsed by the novel, it continued to inspire writers from Thomas More to Georges Perec. As the historian George Tolias writes, isolarii “seem to reflect an ‘underground’ geographical culture...that flourished in the experimental and tolerant climate of the Renaissance but has now slipped out of our grasp.”

Six hundred years after the first isolarii were published, we take up this genre-bending format to navigate the turbulence of our times. Each book is a ready-to-hand island. Together, they are a growing archipelago. Islands from which to view the world anew.


jenkins

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Reply #124 on: July 05, 2021, 02:58:15 AM
I'm finally in on John Ashbery, who I haven't been delaying so much as just now is when he happened for me. he's the David Lynch of poetry, in terms of you can't pin him down and no one can pass him. another way to say that is you can't pass him by duplicating him. Lynch follows Buńuel, though Lynch is nothing like Buńuel. to be a true original is the hardest thing of all. to break the form is the biggest deal, artistically speaking. in poetry Ashbery follows Eliot


jenkins

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Reply #125 on: July 12, 2021, 11:36:07 PM


it's cool. this is actually the first book of his I've read. so I can't compare it to his others, I could only compare it to his movie (which I liked). like the movie, it's deadpan melodrama. the casual extremity appeals to me, since it reaches inside of being human, and I support his preference for troubled types, whom he forgives, while taking shots at cultural perspectives


WorldForgot

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Reply #126 on: July 13, 2021, 12:12:08 AM
The Marbled Swarm, of Cooper's, iz ill. Great architecture to its depravity. A gothic building sort of texture. Gotta read this one.


Robyn

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Reply #127 on: July 17, 2021, 06:24:28 AM
Got these today (but no OUATIH because it was out of stock)



WorldForgot

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Reply #128 on: July 17, 2021, 07:50:56 PM
Witch by Jen Silverman iz a neat, lyrical dance of a play. Arias and a revolving-door (or russian roulette?) sort of structure of bidding toward the future with our soul. A turn on The Witch of Edmonton by Rowley, Dekker, and Ford but totally it's own in voice and form.

(i really wanna read that de palma & susan lehman)


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Reply #129 on: July 20, 2021, 05:26:56 PM
I never thought my cinephile adventures would take me here, but most mainstream movies are no longer showing me something I’m uncomfortable to see, and if a movie can’t hurt me why would I watch it?

This post of wilder's bounces around my mind daily. Re-reading I re-found this from John Hawkes' Whistlejacket:

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It is the photographer who counts and not his model. The mind of the photographer. Without time to think, without self-consciousness, without time for this choice or that, in time so brief it belongs only to photography itself, the person with the camera concentrates like no one else. He sees the picture before he takes it, he knows what it will look like before he sees the finished print. He sees what no ordinary person sees. Convention prohibits speaking intimately to strangers of the opposite sex and yet there are those, no matter how few, who are able to say anything they wish to strangers. Sudden intimate speech and behavior is a rare gift. And the photographer, or the kind of photographer I have in mind, intrudes into convention in the same way except with sight, not speech, though sometimes both.