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#41
The Small Screen / Re: Assorted Marvel television...
Last post by Jeremy Blackman - May 17, 2022, 06:46:59 PM


YIKES

Come for the Shrek-level animation, stay for the gender stereotype jokes.
#42
The Grapevine / Earwig (Lucile Hadžihalilović)
Last post by wilder - May 17, 2022, 06:27:00 PM

Somewhere in Europe, mid-20th century. Albert is employed to look after Mia, a girl with teeth of ice. Mia never leaves their apartment, where the shutters are always closed. The telephone rings regularly and the Master enquires after Mia's wellbeing. Until the day Albert is instructed that he must prepare the child to leave.

Directed by Lucile Hadžihalilović (Innocence)
Written by Lucile Hadžihalilović and Geoff Cox, based on the novel by Brian Catling
Release Date - TBD, blu-ray forthcoming from Anti-Worlds in the UK
#43
News and Theory / Re: Theatrical Exhibition
Last post by RudyBlatnoyd - May 17, 2022, 04:35:00 PM
Quote from: WorldForgot on May 17, 2022, 04:11:43 PMNetflix reportedly plans to keep some movies in theaters for longer before streaming, including its upcoming 'Knives Out' sequel

QuoteBloomberg's Lucas Shaw reported on Sunday that Netflix is considering releasing some movies in theaters this year with an exclusive theatrical window of 45 days. That's longer than the window Netflix has typically given the movies it releases in theaters, and more in line with what is emerging as a new windowing standard.

Two of the movies in consideration, according to Bloomberg, are the "Knives Out" sequel and director Alejandro González Iñárritu's "Bardo."

Netflix declined to comment on the Bloomberg report when requested by Insider.

Have Netflix finally realised that the old Hollywood studio model of releasing a movie in theatres first and then only later releasing it to home entertainment is actually potentially more profitable than just dumping it straight to streaming without any fanfare and then watching lots of your subscribers leave because they've learned to value your content as little as you appear to do? For a bunch of super brain geniuses, these silicon valley guys seem to miss the blindingly obvious quite often when they engage in 'disruptive' business practices.
#44
News and Theory / Re: Theatrical Exhibition
Last post by WorldForgot - May 17, 2022, 04:11:43 PM
Netflix reportedly plans to keep some movies in theaters for longer before streaming, including its upcoming 'Knives Out' sequel

QuoteBloomberg's Lucas Shaw reported on Sunday that Netflix is considering releasing some movies in theaters this year with an exclusive theatrical window of 45 days. That's longer than the window Netflix has typically given the movies it releases in theaters, and more in line with what is emerging as a new windowing standard.

Two of the movies in consideration, according to Bloomberg, are the "Knives Out" sequel and director Alejandro González Iñárritu's "Bardo."

Netflix declined to comment on the Bloomberg report when requested by Insider.
#45
The Small Screen / Re: Better Call Saul
Last post by Drenk - May 17, 2022, 03:28:18 PM
Quote from: Drenk on May 11, 2022, 12:57:14 AMDon't get me wrong, they could craft a thrilling scene of a person cooking pasta or doing their laces, so I'm still entertained—but I can taste filler.

This week, fancy three minutes montage of somebody making coffee.
#46
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: On the Falling Man in Punc...
Last post by DickHardwood2022 - May 17, 2022, 04:16:41 AM
To be honest mate I was thinking the same thing  :yabbse-grin:
#47
Paul Thomas Anderson / On the Falling Man in Punch-Dr...
Last post by Bleep - May 17, 2022, 02:48:17 AM
Remember in Punch-Drunk Love when the character falls off his chair, tangentially to the scene and ensuing action? Now, Fair Reader, we can absorb this moment in various ways; here are only a few, mentioned as a trigger of thought for others : (1) yes, the falling man is a nod to the classic romps of the 1930s, and further back to the wacky antics of the silent era; (2) yes, we may read into the falling man something significant symbolically regarding the coming change of the main character (e.g., the Hanged Man tarot card conveys not especially, or exclusively, death, but, as tradition would have it, transformation). (3) Just here I'll reflect on the phenomenon of "falling over" itself; that is to say, a human being physically shifting position from upright to sprawled. "Why is this funny?" asked the philosopher Bergson. "Why do people laugh at people falling?" So Bergson wrote an entire book exploring that one question. Fundamentally (and now comes a heavy thought for Xixax and the Internet), the Falling Man may be funny because people laughing at it see in the phenomenon of Falling a violation of Reason. Reason itself is founded on nothing more than the physical sensation of standing upright. Yes, folks, one's confidence is founded on air, and nothing else, for a lifetime. Now here comes the money-shot : though most no-one would care to believe the philosopher's viewpoint just stated (which dates back to the ancient Greeks), still and all, people laugh when they see other people fall down—because of Reason's involuntary reaction of "I win! I am stronger and better! I am real! I am the Right Way! I am upright and confident! I know everything! So there!" Just as, for example, a registered Democrat votes Democrat, so Reason stumps for Reason, and laughs at the falling man.

But Bleep says : the Artist-Philosopher laughs at the upright. Thus, PTA : "People."

And so now back to the Iliad, Book XI, subtitled "Apocalypse Now".

"Man. I like the sound of that."

https://www.odysseyandiliad.com/

Best wishes.
#48
The Director's Chair / Re: dave depraved cronenberg
Last post by wilder - May 16, 2022, 05:31:27 PM
David Cronenberg Confirms Netflix Passed On Series Version Of His Novel 'Consumed' Which He's Turning Into A Film
The Playlist

After an eight-year hiatus from the screen, NEON ("Parasite") is releasing David Cronenberg's latest body horror film, "Crimes of The Future" next month. Cronenberg has revealed in a new interview with Variety that the movie, starring Viggo Mortensen, Lea Seydoux, and Kristen Stewart, was originally offered to streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon but they didn't bite.

That wasn't the only project of Cronenberg's rejected by Netflix—his series adaptation of his novel "Consumed" was turned away too. The filmmaker revealed he's about to start writing a feature version of "Consumed," but his supernatural film "The Shrouds," starring French actor Vincent Cassel ("Eastern Promises"), comes next and was announced for the Cannes Market last week.

"That's correct. I don't have a screenplay yet for that but I will be writing that." Cronenberg told Variety about the status of the "Consumed" film incarnation. "But at the moment, the other project, which is called 'The Shrouds,' would come first. And so, yeah, we'll have an interesting announcement to make about it."

The official synopsis of the "Consumed" novel via Penguin Random House reads as follows:

In the book-filled, artfully messy Paris apartment of the famous French intellectuals Célestine and Aristide Arosteguy, an astonishing discovery is made. The grisly, butchered remains of Célestine are found–partially eaten–and her husband, sought by the police for questioning, has disappeared. Naomi Seberg, a young journalist, embarks upon a quest to uncover the truth of Célestine's death and Aristide's role in it, traveling to Tokyo to interview the suspected cannibal, while her boyfriend, Nathan Math, a medical journalist, seduces the cancer patient of a controversial Hungarian doctor, contracts a sexually transmitted disease, and traces the disease's famous discoverer to Forest Hill Village in Toronto, where he encounters the most interesting journalistic subject of all.

While Cronenberg is keen on the idea of streaming, he attributes Netflix's rejection of both "Consumed" and "Crimes of The Future" to the entertainment company being "conservative."

"It turns out that it's not so easy to get a series with Netflix. In fact, it seems that it might be easier to get an independent film made if it's of a certain type. I'd say maybe a film that isn't the conservative kind of movie as Netflix would like."

Cronenberg continued to speak on the health of the film industry and Netflix's role, saying, "Netflix has certainly affected the movie industry and the exhibition industry with cinemas. I think cinemas are dying, frankly. I think there will be cinemas, but there won't be so many of them, and they will be showing niche films because otherwise, they'll just be showing Marvel superhero movies."
#49
Real-Life Soundtracks / Re: Favorite Music Videos
Last post by WorldForgot - May 16, 2022, 10:38:32 AM
QuoteSociety is always changing. Value systems are rebuilt and old constructs are denounced. Motivations are reinterpreted and new challenges will always surface. We are a culture of many narratives; "Swish Swash" is a reference to the ebb and flow of our worldview from its shaky mythological foundation. We mix bygones with topical symbology to represent the malleability of collective-consciousness. From Pepe The Frog to Trudeau in a headdress, our intention is to represent the banal, exploitative nature of the television we watch and the clickbait we read. This work is made in testament to the shapeshifting propaganda of our time.



QuoteChoy's rock bottom and turning point came in his early 20s when he realised he felt too messed up to call his mother, who had always been supportive despite having her own addiction issues.

Music became "an obsession that replaces the substance abuse", says Choy. His father's huge record collection was still at home. After initially connecting with the fury in punk, grindcore and powerviolence, he later enjoyed the calm of Brian Eno albums. The idea that Eno, a non-musician, could facilitate musicians gave Choy the spark of the idea for Crack Cloud, and the band congregated around people who were "fundamentally about recovery and taking care of your mental health", rather than making money.

Sharar funnelled his intense demeanour into the band's idea of "creativity with no rules". Guitarist Jon Varley is also moving on from addiction, while multi-instrumentalist Daniel Robertson met Choy when working in a homeless centre; he was recreating his "whole world view" after growing up a devout Christian. Although seven members have come to the UK, the Crack Cloud community now consists of 20 people. "We spend all our time working on stuff," Sharar explains, "so anyone who spends time with us kinda gets dragged in."

Their work in low-barrier care (care services that try to be as accessible to users as possible) and overdose prevention is as much a part of their operation as the band. Vancouver is in the midst of an opiate and fentanyl crisis; people with addiction issues migrate to the Downtown Eastside's specially provided safe spaces for drug use. "It's basically a shoot-up zone," Choy says. "The appearance is terrifying but once you immerse yourself, as we do with our work, you realise it's a very inclusive community that are dealing with their own traumas."



#50
News and Theory / Re: RESULTS! - The 2022 Xixax ...
Last post by Yes - May 15, 2022, 06:31:56 PM
Thanks for doing this. Some fun wins.

Didn't think Licorice Pizza would actually take Film lol. The Wright Supporting win is cool and also unexpected