Favorite Commentaries By Film Historians

Started by Gamblour., October 20, 2003, 08:52:47 PM

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Gamblour.

Not to be confused with commentaries by people related with the film. Michael Jeck's (I think it's Jeck) commentary on Se7en Samurai (had to do that  :P ) is really friggin good and I remember enjoying the one he did for Throne of Blood. Roger Ebert's is great for Citizen Kane. Who else?
WWPTAD?

godardian

I was just mentioning this earlier in a different thread:

Laura Mulvey's Peeping Tom commentary is very enlightening and revelatory.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

samsong

anything by Peter Cowie (only heard his commentaries for Grand Illusion and The Seventh Seal; found both of them fascinating)

godardian

Quote from: samsonganything by Peter Cowie (only heard his commentaries for Grand Illusion and The Seventh Seal; found both of them fascinating)

Agreed. Some nice introductions to Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, and The Silence. He's all over the Criterion discs, esp. the Bergmans.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Ravi

Professor Carrot Top, Rules of Attraction.

Pwaybloe

I always liked Julie Jones's commentary on "Belle de Jour."  Not only is she a film scholar, but you can tell she is a huge fan of Bunuel and his work.  

For anybody who's going to the University of New Orleans, she is still teaching classes.  More info here.

I also second the guy who did the Seven Samurai commentary.  That guy is a fountain of knowledge.

edison

Anything with Bruce Eder; did some work for Criterion

soixante

Peter Bogdanovich's commentary for Citizen Kane was truly illuminating.  Bogdanovich is one of the foremost film scholars in the world, he's also directed a bunch of films, and he was a close friend of Orson Welles.
Music is your best entertainment value.

nix

On the Ebert tip, his tracks on Dark City and Casablanca kick ass as well.
"Sex relieves stress, love causes it."
-Woddy Allen

wiped_out


Reelist

He ain't no goddamn historian!

Quote from: Gamblour. on October 20, 2003, 08:52:47 PM
Roger Ebert's is great for Citizen Kane.
That's the only one I really know.  Shouldn't have given my Dark City Dvd away before listening to his on that. Looking forward to Richard Schickel's on Dirty Harry.

Ostrich Riding Cowboy

Does the other Steven Soderbergh on the Schizopolis commentary count?
DIDI: I missed you . . . and at the same time I was happy. Isn't that a strange thing?