Author Topic: Frankie Machine  (Read 6192 times)

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MacGuffin

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Frankie Machine
« on: June 19, 2007, 08:31:49 PM »
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Scorsese and De Niro Reteaming
Surprise! For a mob movie no less.

After Robert De Niro reteams with his Heat and Godfather co-star Al Pacino for Righteous Kill, he will reunite with Oscar-winning director Martin Scorsese for the ninth time for the crime pic Frankie Machine.

The adaptation of Don Winslow's novel The Winter of Frankie Machine will be produced by De Niro's Tribeca shingle.

DeadlineHollywoodDaily.com reports [see below], "Scorsese is set to direct it for Paramount under his deal there."

The site adds that the title has been shortened to just Frankie Machine, and that it is expected to be Scorsese's next film following his Rolling Stones project.

Brian Koppelman and David Levien (Ocean's Thirteen) penned the screenplay adaptation. Don Winslow's official site had the following plot synopsis:

"Frank Machianno, aka Frankie Machine, retires from his life as a contract killer and begins a new life in San Diego. Far removed from any of the thrills of his mob life, he opens a bait shack on Ocean Beach Pier, runs three other legit businesses, and when nothing else demands his attention, puts his board in the water and rides the waves. Not a bad life for the 62-year-old Vietnam vet; at least most of the time it is quiet. Frankie's life however returns to the tension, suspense and terror of the 'old-days' when the head of the Los Angeles syndicate calls in a marker, and asks him for backup during a meeting with members of the Detroit mob. The meeting is suppose to be an effort to resolve the current disputes between the two groups, but turns out to be a setup to end Frankie's life."

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De Niro And Scorsese Team Up Yet Again
While recently promo-ing his The Good Shepherd, Robert De Niro said he had one particular desire over all: to do two more movies with Martin Scorsese and make it an even 10 they did together. I can report that No. 9 is underway. De Niro has long had lined up The Winter of Frankie Machine, based on the book about a retired hit man, and now I'm told that Scorsese is set to direct it for Paramount under his deal there. I understand the pic's name has been shortened to just Frankie Machine. There's no announcement yet, but I've heard this from a good source. Crime writer Don Winslow wrote the book after growing up with the children of his neighborhood Mafia bosses, so he understood the criminal mind behind the hit man who's hounded out of a respectable retirement as the target of a hit himself. Despite his own history of brutality, the protagonist is actually quite likable -- which explains why the manuscript was snapped up by De Niro even before it was published. Back in March, Variety reported that already Ocean's Thirteen screenwriters Brian Koppelman and David Levien were writing the screenplay for De Niro. Bobby has talked before how he and Marty have started some projects over the years only to get distracted, and how they were both "anxiously waiting" to come up with something. For the record, here are their 8 pics together: Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, New York New York, Raging Bull, The King Of Comedy, Goodfellas, Cape Fear, and Casino. I hear Scorsese will get started right after his Rolling Stones project. Another mob movie: what could be better?
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2007, 11:41:02 PM »
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A worthy project. Feels like a good way to end the De Niro-Scorsese focus on mob films. I hope it gets made and isn't relegated to one of many numerous films Scorsese never made.

The hope would be that Scorsese would do Silence, but the feeling is that he isn't going to get the chance to do it right away and is going to have to settle. I'm glad he is settling for something like this instead of a Departed rip off.

©brad

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2007, 08:18:43 AM »
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Feels like a good way thing would be to end the De Niro-Scorsese focus on mob films.

Alexandro

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2007, 06:08:10 PM »
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the premise is kinda weak is it not? But it also sounds like the kind of premise from which tons of fertile and interesting possibilities can arise.


MacGuffin

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2007, 05:02:35 PM »
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Has Martin Scorsese Dropped out of Directing FRANKIE MACHINE?
Source: Collider.com
 
According to a very reliable source, it looks like all the people looking forward to a new Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese mafia movie are about to be disappointed.
 
The reason? It seems that Mr. Scorsese has dropped out of directing “Frankie Machine” and, according to my source, it seems quite likely the production will fall apart without his involvement.
 
For those who hadn’t heard of “Frankie Machine,” the film was being made at Paramount and the original title was “The Winter of Frankie Machine.” The story was about a retired hit man and back in March of this year, Variety reported that “Ocean's Thirteen” screenwriters Brian Koppelman and David Levien were writing the screenplay for De Niro before Scorsese got involved.

Obviously I’m a huge fan of Martin Scorsese mafia movies, with “Goodfellas” being one of my favorite films of all time. So while he may have dropped out of the film and disappointed those who wanted to see another team-up, perhaps they have something even better being planned. Let’s hope so.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2007, 10:22:31 PM »
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Michael Mann reteams with De Niro
Director, 'Heat' star to make 'Frankie Machine'
Source: Variety
 
Helmer Michael Mann has cut a deal at Paramount Pictures to develop "Frankie Machine" as a star vehicle for Robert De Niro.

De Niro and Jane Rosenthal produce through their Tribeca Films shingle. Alex Tse has just been set to do a major overhaul of the concept under Mann's supervision.

The drama is an adaptation of Don Winslow novel "The Winter of Frankie Machine." De Niro will play Frank Machianno, a mob hitman who has retired to run a bait shop. He agrees to help the son of a mob boss resolve a dispute with another Mafioso but is forced to turn into Frankie Machine again when he realizes he's been set up to be killed.

De Niro came aboard the project when Paramount bought the book. A draft was original written by Brian Koppelman and David Levien.

De Niro has of late eschewed playing the mobsters that defined his early career but made an exception after he read the Winslow novel well before it was published. De Niro and Mann previously teamed for 1995's "Heat."

Mann, who last directed "Miami Vice," just made a deal at Columbia Pictures for "Empire," a John Logan-scripted drama that will star Will Smith.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Alexandro

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2007, 03:48:50 PM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2007, 06:30:18 AM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

Maybe, but Mann seems to be more on auto pilot with his filmmaking than even Scorsese. At least Scorsese has had different periods and trends, but much of Mann's career has been a dedication of Sergio Leone widescreen look mixed with a documentary feel. Even his period piece, The Last of the Mohicans, doesn't have that much difference to a film like Ali. The format of digital forced him to change it up with Collateral, but I'd argue if it really was a development. I think the best combination of his style to story is still The Insider. I'm hopeful Frankie Machine will be good, but he's a filmmaker too devoted to his established style.


ElPandaRoyal

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2007, 05:35:37 PM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

he's a filmmaker too devoted to his established style.



If the style is great, then there's nothing really wrong with that...
Si

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2007, 07:59:09 PM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

he's a filmmaker too devoted to his established style.



If the style is great, then there's nothing really wrong with that...

You believe a style is great enough to suit every kind of story? That's ridiculous.

SiliasRuby

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2007, 11:07:29 PM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

he's a filmmaker too devoted to his established style.



If the style is great, then there's nothing really wrong with that...

You believe a style is great enough to suit every kind of story? That's ridiculous.
GT's right. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn't. But it's the old style over substance argument. Yes, in some examples the style of a movie can overcompensate for the shitty story, if it is a shitty story. Like Crank. But I haven't seen Crank so I have absolutely no idea what I am talking about there. I don't know if Mann will do a better job than Scorsese, but it will certainly be different. Probably no stones music in the Mann one. hehe....fuck it I'll still see it.
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Gold Trumpet

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2007, 11:22:42 PM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

he's a filmmaker too devoted to his established style.



If the style is great, then there's nothing really wrong with that...

You believe a style is great enough to suit every kind of story? That's ridiculous.
GT's right. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn't. But it's the old style over substance argument.

It's not even that. Yes, I do take consideration of the importance of style if well done and meaningful, but ElPandaRoyal takes it further by saying Mann's marked approach to every project is A-OK. Some filmmakers like Kubrick were able to switch gears from project to project, but Mann has been approaching different subjects and periods with more or less the same look and feel to the story. Collateral looks different, but I believe the technology used was more the reason why it does.

ElPandaRoyal

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2007, 05:47:58 AM »
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I gotta accept that Mann making this sounds waaaaay more interesting that Scorsese behind it.

he's a filmmaker too devoted to his established style.



If the style is great, then there's nothing really wrong with that...

You believe a style is great enough to suit every kind of story? That's ridiculous.

But the way I see it, Mann's stories are perfect for his style and vice-versa. If you look at some of his movies like "Manhunter" ou "Thief" or even "Heat" (partially anyway) or whatever, the style isn't quite there yet. It's just that since a certain period in his career, the stories he chose to tell fit a certain style. He seems to be more headed into that direction now, and to me there's nothing wrong with that, because I do think the style is great and makes movies like "Miami Vice" or "Collateral" which had some writing problems, better than what they would have been if someone else did it.

As for Kubrick changing his style from project to project, I really can't quite agree. The tone of the stories did change, but the style was mostly his, and that's what makes an auteur an auteur. What I think great filmmakers have is a gift to modulate stories into their style and make them work. It's not even a matter of style over substance, it's just that the style comes from the filmmaker's vision of film/world, and the way they see the stories.

I'd say Coppola changes his style a lot from film to film according to the story.
Si

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2007, 12:33:07 PM »
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But the way I see it, Mann's stories are perfect for his style and vice-versa. If you look at some of his movies like "Manhunter" ou "Thief" or even "Heat" (partially anyway) or whatever, the style isn't quite there yet. It's just that since a certain period in his career, the stories he chose to tell fit a certain style. He seems to be more headed into that direction now, and to me there's nothing wrong with that, because I do think the style is great and makes movies like "Miami Vice" or "Collateral" which had some writing problems, better than what they would have been if someone else did it.

I'll grant you, his stories are never more challenging than any other, but this isn't the 1930s - 1950s where familarity is accepted because today it breeds staleness. It shows a filmmaker is subject the performance of his actors or the strength of his screenwriter to really make a good film. I don't believe in the auteur theory that direction is the criterion value in which to judge a film, but Michael Mann giving the same lay out to every story and subject he does is ridiculous. It makes interpretations of his stories predictable in a filmic sense and only guessable on how well others do. Even a dedicated stylist like Sergio Leone had a period of progression from A Fistfull of Dollars to Once Upon the Time in the West and finally Once Upon a Time in America.

As for Kubrick changing his style from project to project, I really can't quite agree. The tone of the stories did change, but the style was mostly his, and that's what makes an auteur an auteur. What I think great filmmakers have is a gift to modulate stories into their style and make them work. It's not even a matter of style over substance, it's just that the style comes from the filmmaker's vision of film/world, and the way they see the stories.

Only his last three films have a similar style, but look at his filmmaking from Dr. Strangelove until Barry Lyndon. Four films in all, each one has a completely different filmmaking scheme. The tone and feel could be the same if you made parallels between the films for their distance and coldness, but each film had a completely different set up to stylization.

ElPandaRoyal

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Re: Frankie Machine
« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2007, 01:14:32 PM »
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I think it's a question up to debate, but I can't see it as much more than a matter of personal vision. That's what film is in the eyes of Michael Mann and so his movies end up looking a lot like each others, but each one has its own merits and great scenes. And again, we can see the evolution of his style from his earlier films to the latter ones, but there will always be points in common, that's for sure. The same with Leone. His dollars trilogy very similar, and even Once Upon a Time in America has a lot of Leone's trademarks, even though it's also different enough. But I understand what you're saying about Michael Mann, and I think it's because of the tone of his stories and everything. Kubrick changed a lot in his stories from movie to movie, and I think in his case, it's more curious, because even though those differences are there, it always looks like Kubrick. It's always the same style. I think only 2001 is considerably different from the other movies of the period you mention in terms of kubrick-ness. But the staging of scenes, the sots, even the sets, are very very Kubrick - zooms, lensing and performances. It's all there in his movies. And that's why I love him. Because he created a style of his own that's perfectly distinct. Anyway, that said, Mann is no Kubrick.

This is a somewhat elaborate response written while doing something else, so sorry if the english or clarity aren't quite there...
Si

 

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