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MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #150 on: December 01, 2006, 01:04:48 PM »
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INLAND EMPIRE Press Release and Website

A new website will be up that will give details on Theatrical Release Dates and Exclusive Clips.


http://www.inlandempirecinema.com/

INLAND EMPIRE Website Goes Live
The Official INLAND EMPIRE Website has been updated. They now have links to Reviews, the Poster, Theatrical Schedule, Stills and soon an Official Trailer.


ďDon't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.Ē - Andy Warhol


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Astrostic

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #151 on: December 02, 2006, 02:02:14 AM »
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the trailer is live and you need to download an FLV Player to watch it.  It is short and doesn't spoil too much, but if you haven't seen the film and you have already decided to see it, I don't recommend watching it.  It spoils a very scary moment in the film and plays one of Lynch's sung songs from the film.

modage

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #152 on: December 02, 2006, 11:55:11 PM »
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so i saw INLAND EMPIRE for the 2nd time tonite, again with Lynch, Dern and Theroux in attendance for a Q&A.  i was lucky enough to be able to ask him a question as well as meet mr. Lynch after the film where he signed my Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive DVD's.  i'll be seeing him introduce Vertigo on monday. 

as far as the film goes...  after the first viewing i felt somewhere between taz and samsong.  or maybe i felt both equally as strong.  it was one of the most incredible theatre experiences of my life on a purely viceral level but as a narrative film it was completely incomprehensible.  i thought anyone who would claim to 'get' the film was completely full of shit.  however on 2nd viewing i realized the first viewing as like taking a puzzle out of the box and spilling it onto the floor.  but the 2nd viewing i started to put the pieces together.  i'm still nowhere near completing it but i have started to make connections. 

more later.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

JG

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #153 on: December 03, 2006, 12:13:06 AM »
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so you've seen it twice, both with david lynch?  thats just not fair to the rest of us.  any pics? 

MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #154 on: December 03, 2006, 01:28:55 AM »
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Don't want to download a FLV Player?


Trailer here.
ďDon't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.Ē - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #155 on: December 05, 2006, 01:28:45 AM »
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David Lynch wants to get in your bloodstream
The ''Mulholland Drive'' director talks about big bunny heads and his new coffee business
Source: Jeff Jensen; Entertainment Weekly
 
David Lynch is a movie director. You probably know that, even if you've never seen The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet, or Mulholland Drive, each of which earned him an Oscar nomination and helped coin an adjective: Lynchian, akin to Kafkaesque, meaning bizarrely banal, or just plain trippy. He has worked in TV, having created the cult classic Twin Peaks, and is also a painter, cartoonist, computer animator, fine-art photographer, musician, professional furniture-maker, and amateur meteorologist. Every weekday morning at his website, Davidlynch.com ó a repository of Lynchian strangeness ó he posts a video of himself reporting on the weather outside his Los Angeles home, and he does it without a wink of irony. Yes, David Lynch is many things, and he's about to become a few more. On the eve of the release of his new movie, Inland Empire, an experimental psychological thriller starring Laura Dern, he's embarking on one of the most peculiar pursuits in his peculiar career.

He's getting into the coffee business.

''David Lynch Signature Cup,'' says the director, 60, his nasal twang pitched with pride. No joke: Lynch, who fetishized coffee in Twin Peaks (along with cigarettes, pie, lumber, old factories, and very sexy women), is taking on Starbucks. Available in espresso, decaf, and house roast, Lynch's beans will come packaged in stylish jet-black metal tubes that will include coasters emblazoned with Lynchian graphics including images from his freaky first feature Eraserhead. You'll soon find it at David lynch.com and at select movie theaters playing Inland Empire, too. ''I think it's going to be...good coffee for the people,'' he says with a hint of a smirk, as if he's just said something rather sly. ''You want a cup?''

The only answer to that question is yes. We are inside his painting studio, perched atop the sloping grounds of his Hollywood Hills property. He's got his work clothes on ó white dress shirt flecked with green paint, buttoned to his neck and tucked into khaki pants. On his desk is a sculpture he's been gluing together (it looks like a bra cup mounted on a block of wood) and a cracked toilet seat. Deadpan, Lynch explains: ''That's just something I gotta fix.''

He's trying to fix some other things, too. Like Hollywood. And maybe his future as a filmmaker. With Inland Empire, Lynch is going more indie than ever, opting to distribute and market the movie himself. After premiering Inland Empire on Dec. 2 in New York and Dec. 9 in L.A., Lynch will take it city to city beginning in January. ''Just like Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner's Daughter,'' he says. ''Throw the records in the car, we're hitting the road!'' Did Lynch embrace this unconventional strategy because his financiers, StudioCanal, couldn't cut a suitable deal with a U.S. distributor for a three-hour experimental film with dim commercial prospects? Yes. But with the movie industry struggling with shrinking profit margins and changing technology, Lynch believes that in order to continue exploring his interior worlds ó his Inland Empire ó he must dramatically change the way he does business, too.

''The world is really changing. Topsy-turvy,'' says Lynch, hands covering his face, eyes peeking through tobacco-stained fingers like he's watching a horror movie. ''I just read that studios are asking artists to lower their fees. This is just the beginning!''

According to Dern, who starred in Lynch's Blue Velvet and Wild at Heart, Inland Empire captures that anxiety. She plays several characters, including an actress who begins to lose her mind while starring in an old-fashioned melodrama. Prostitutes, creepy Polish folktales, and giant rabbit heads are also involved. ''The film is a reflection of David's love for old Hollywood, and coming to terms with the death of what Hollywood represents for him, too,'' says Dern. ''It's a new day. For David, for film, for all of us.''

Hence, the coffee. And the Eraserhead ringtones as well, which you can also purchase through David lynch.com. Most of the revenues generated by these endeavors will help fund Lynch's bid for self-sufficiency. ''We're trying to create a David Lynch brand,'' says Eric Bassett, who heads up Absurda, the company Lynch has created to handle his business affairs. Ask Lynch what the David Lynch brand stands for, and the man who has spent his entire career refusing to define himself actually has an answer.

''Freedom.''

When the movie world last heard from Lynch, he had just completed the second major comeback of his career. The first came in 1986, when he erased the debacle of Dune with his disturbing masterpiece, Blue Velvet. After Twin Peaks and Wild at Heart in 1990, he imploded again with another indulgent mess, 1992's Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, the feature-film prequel to the TV series. But he began to change minds again with 1999's The Straight Story, shocking in its poignant linear normalcy. That same year should have also seen a new TV series starring an unknown actress named Naomi Watts, except ABC hated the pilot for Mulholland Drive and canned it. But one year later, during a session of Transcendental Meditation, Lynch came up with an idea to turn the failed pilot into the movie that marked his triumphant return to form.

''The road to Mulholland Drive was wonderful and weird,'' says Lynch, pulling a cigarette from his breast pocket and firing up. ''But the road to Inland Empire was even weirder.''

Like Mulholland Drive, Inland Empire wasn't even supposed to be a movie. It began as a series of experiments with a gadget that has radically changed Lynch's life, the thing he called ''my little bitty toy camera,'' a handheld Sony PD150 digital video recorder. It was the remedy for what he hated about shooting on film: the waiting ó for lights to be set up, for the crew to turn the cameras around, etc. One day, about three years ago, Lynch called Dern and asked her if she would shoot a scene he had written for her. She did. Later, he wrote another scene, and asked Dern to do it. This happened many times.

Digital video was clearly firing Lynch's imagination. At his home, the director shot a surreal sitcom about a family of giant rabbits. ''I don't know what to say,'' he says, blowing cigarette smoke out of the corner of a crooked smile. ''It just felt correct.'' At the same time, he was falling in love with Poland after befriending the organizers of a film festival in Lodz. (''I said, 'I'll come to your festival, but could you set it up so I could photograph those old factories there? And some nude women, too?' And they did!'') On one trip to Lodz, he decided to shoot a scene he made up on the fly with some local actors. ''He was intoxicated with the process, freewheeling with this camera and his talent,'' says Lynch's longtime producer and former companion Mary Sweeney.

Lynch originally intended to use a lot of this stuff on his website. But one day, he decided to transfer the Dern scenes to film, just to see what it would look like. It was blurry and flawed ó and Lynch liked it. It reminded him of old Hollywood films, ''when the picture wasn't as clear as today's film,'' he says. ''I think when something isn't so realistic, when the frame is dark or out of focus, the mind kicks, and you start to dream.''

And then he got an idea. When Lynch talks about getting ideas, he opens and closes his hands, like a radio tower broadcasting a signal. In this case, the idea told him that the Dern monologues, the rabbit sitcom, and the Poland stuff were adding up to something, a movie kind of something, which could be completed with some new footage. He considers the making of Inland Empire the closest he's come to replicating the greatest creative experience of his career ó the five years he spent making Eraserhead while he was a student at the American Film Institute. ''I came from painting, where it's just you and the paint,'' says Lynch. ''Digital facilitates a similar experience. You can get deeper into it.''

Now he's selling it the way he made it: by himself. Becoming his own movie mogul has been a revealing and revolting experience. Wanting to mount an Oscar campaign on behalf of Dern, Lynch discovered it would cost him $3 million. He was appalled. Instead, Lynch is using guerrilla PR tactics that are part Dern advocacy and part protest, such as sitting on L.A. street corners with a poster of Dern. And a cow. ''It's like a David Lynch movie,'' laughs Dern. ''It's out-there and irreverent, and yet he's saying something of pretty phenomenal value. It's fabulous, insane, and very sweet.''

Lynch hopes Inland Empire can further inspire the desktop filmmaking movement, although he doesn't embrace the desktop viewing experience. Watching films on computer monitors instead of a movie screen? ''A total nightmare,'' he says. And while Lynch's marketing honcho Bassett is jazzed by the idea of expanding Absurda into an operation that could assist other filmmakers, Sweeney wonders just how ambitious Lynch really is. ''Until he goes through the experience, the jury's still out,'' she says. ''I think he doesn't know what he's getting into a little bit.''

CEO Lynch acknowledges a few tactical errors. If the coffee and the ringtones had been ready sooner, he says, he would have had more money to launch his new film. But he's hoping that publicity around some of his other upcoming endeavors can help the cause. And then there's Lynch's self-replenishing fan base. Early reviews of Inland Empire have been mixed, but preview screenings overflow with college kids for whom Lynch films have become an intellectual rite of passage. ''I think that's just neat,'' Lynch says. Ask him who he thinks his audience is and he laughs. ''I don't know!'' But then he takes a long drag off his cigarette. ''If I had to,'' he says, ''I would say anyone with an open mind, and anyone open to experiencing other possible worlds. That's what I want from movies. That's what I love.''
ďDon't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.Ē - Andy Warhol


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JG

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #156 on: December 05, 2006, 06:52:17 PM »
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i finally indulged and watched the trailer.  i don't think i've ever been so excited for a movie in my entire life.  i haven't had a PTA movie or Kubrick movie to anticipate like some of you guys have.  I wasn't even a Malick fan when The New World was released.  The closest was Eternal Sunshine, and I stopped getting excited for Scorsese movies after Gangs of New York. 

So...I can't wait.   


Pubrick

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #157 on: December 06, 2006, 09:53:56 AM »
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Sweeney wonders just how ambitious Lynch really is. ''Until he goes through the experience, the jury's still out,'' she says. ''I think he doesn't know what he's getting into a little bit.''

Spoken like an ex-wife.
under the paving stones.

MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #158 on: December 07, 2006, 11:23:50 AM »
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If I didnít know better I would think David Lynch was Italian. He uses his hands to describe ideas more than anyone I have ever met. Itís fascinating to watch this man communicate. He pulls out the cigarette pack, the lighter, moves the ashtray, lights the cigarette, puts the pack away the and then, once his hands are free, resumes emphasizing his words with enigmatic gestures. Lynch, a four-time Oscar nominee, remains one of the most enigmatic American filmmakers. He first entered the feature world with Eraserhead, which was a five-year journey. Since then heís directed the film adaptation of Dune, Blue Velvet, co-created the cult television series Twin Peaks and directed many other features. His latest picture, Inland Empire, is the first feature he has shot on video. He's even taking a stab at self-distribution. Inland Empire was another five year journey from start to finish, and once again Lynch is working with old friends and collaborators such as Justin Theroux, Harry Dean Stanton and perhaps his most talented muse, Laura Dern. Dern plays an actor who, after a long dry spell, lands a coveted role in a big film. While filming, Dern's character and the other actors are told that the film is actually a remake of another picture that was never completed for mysterious reasons. Along the way Dern plays two other characters and seems to segue from reality to fantasy without any warning. In other words, Inland Empire is classic Lynch.

Daniel Robert Epstein: Hello David, itís a pleasure to meet you. Iíve been a fan of yours since I saw The Elephant Man as a kid.

David Lynch: Did it freak you out?

DRE:Yes, it did.

DL:Doggone.

DRE:Isnít that what you wanted to do?

DL:No [laughs] but itís tough for a little kid. I remember someone telling me they saw The Elephant Man when they were eight. I think it was a little too much.

DRE:I might have seen it when I was nine or ten.

DL:Uh-huh.

DRE:I had nightmares about your elephant scene.

DL:Right, sure.

DRE:It was very scary. Elephants were friendly when I was a kid.

DL:Uh-huh [laughs].

DRE:I look at Inland Empire as more of an art piece than a feature film. Do you see it that way?

DL:No I donít but Iíve heard people say something like that.

DRE:Do you see a narrative in it?

DL:Yes.

DRE:How many times do I have to see it until I discover the narrative?

DL:Youíd only have to see it once. Well, you might have to see it a couple times, but itís there.

DRE:It reminded me of that old quote of yours from when you first got into film, where you said that you wanted to see the pictures move. Inland Empire feels like you are using the paintbrush to go in many directions. Is that more of an editing process or are you already thinking about this stuff when youíre shooting?

DL:It is weird. It is all from ideas and then the ideas tell you everything. But you get to a point where the ideas are gathered and now youíre getting close to a whole thing, a sequence is indicated pretty clearly. Then thereís a point where for the sake of the whole, another thing happens. When you finally see the whole thing and react to that you see that thereís much more work to be done and then thereís sometimes rearrangements and deletions, maybe even something new that you never thought you were going to use. So itís a process but driven by the ideas.

DRE:Watching Inland Empire is a harrowing experience for the viewer. Is creating it as harrowing?

DL:When you get an idea itís like seeing it in a movie so itís not so much as harrowing, itís like thrilling. It fires you up because then you know what youíre going to do. You get an idea, you love the idea and you love the way cinema is able to translate that idea. Those things are what drive the boat for me. Itís not so harrowing, but if you get a fragment of a whole, thatís usually the way it happens. Starts with fragments, then an unknown thing opens up and thatís sometimes harrowing, but beautifully harrowing because you donít know whatís there and you want to know.

DRE:Is it true that you were writing scenes right before you shot them?

DL:No, not right before I shot them, Iíd write them before I shot them but not necessarily right before [laughs]. Now a couple of times I wrote them the day before, because I was in a place where I had to take advantage of an idea that was there. It was like a blurred, veiled inkling and then this thing happens and you focus on it and it comes into focus and you see it and you write it down. I was in places where I needed to do something there because Iíd be leaving.

DRE:The scene where the prostitutes do the song and dance number to The Loco-Motion reminded me of Lost Highway where in the middle of the movie Robert Loggia freaks on the guy on the highway and also the Naomi Watts audition scene in Mulholland Drive. These are very impressive, in-your-face scenes. Do those things liven it up for you or is that all just part of the process?

DL:Itís part of the process. Different scenes do different things and when youíve got nine girls dancing to The Loco-Motion or something like that, itís got to be in the liveliness department.

DRE:Does a scene like that energize the movie?

DL:No, itís not like you say, ďOh, I need something here.Ē The idea came along for it. It is not that I feel I need something and then would make something to fill that need. The idea is whatís doing it.

DRE:A few years ago I interviewed David Cronenberg. Now, Iím not comparing the two of you.

DL:Good.

DRE:Too many people do that. I asked him if he puts certain things in his movies to tweak the audience and he told me that if he were to do that it would be more like he was tweaking himself. That seems to jibe with what you were saying with just putting something in a film.

DL:Yes, that would be a real false note and I feel like if youíre true to the ideas and you work on it until you realize those ideas and they feel correct based on the idea, then they have a chance of feeling correct for others. Even if youíre going on a intuitive feel, if youíre true to those ideals, sometimes theyíve got these harmonics, if you dick with them, you might ruin the harmonics. They would be bad things and people would start smelling a rat. You may not even understand those harmonics, but somebody out there might and itís true on that level and itís true on the harmonic levels. So youíve got to be real careful.

DRE:Are the harmonics ever not correct?

DL:No, they have to be. If the notes, the chords are correct, the harmonics are going to be correct. But you may not understand the beauty of the harmonics but somebody else might. If youíve been true to these notes, theyíve got a chance to appreciate some other thing. On Eraserhead, I donít remember what it was but I had the feeling that I appreciated some other level of it later, but I wasnít even aware of it when I did it. Itís that thing.

DRE:Your past films are so recognizable and famous for having great, lush cinematography and beautiful colors. Even though Inland Empire does have those things, it is in a much different way.

DL:It was because I was shooting DV so the quality isnít film quality. But it is itís own quality. For projection in theaters it needs to go to film, so youíve got a certain quality resolution DV up-res-ed to Hi Def and then put on film. All these processes are opportunities to me. They keep adding something thatís really magical and beautiful.

DRE:Besides it being shot on video did you try to shoot it the way you did your other films?

DL:I sometimes put it on the tripod and light it but sometimes itís floating. Something happened because Iím holding the camera more on this and when you hold the camera you find yourself moving based on the feeling youíre getting from the scene and I think thatís a secretive act. Youíre looking and listening and you are just doing things that you wouldnít do if you had an operator. You wouldnít be able to tell him in time. Itís more like youíre in there and youíre doing things that you couldnít have done before.

DRE:Did the idea of the movie come before the idea of self-distributing it?

DL:Oh yeah. People would tell me that Iíve got a three hour picture that no one understands. [laughs] But I long for the 14 year old girls in the Midwest to fall in love with Inland Empire and embrace it. That would be so cool. I donít see why it couldnít happen but thereís a whole bunch of things happening and I donít know all of it at all. Itís a feeling that the studios are just following the music industry. The music industry used to be a big advantage to artists and then those advantages started going down and down and down. To the point where they say, Jack give me your final album and maybe weíll distribute it. Theyíre going down low enough so that you say, ďWell wait a minute. Iím going to do the same amount of work, take this advance and thatís the last nickel Iím ever going to see.Ē You donít see another nickel even if your film is doing good. How depressing is that? So Iíd rather go a different route and take my chances. Itís a little bit thrilling to do it. It is a large amount of work but Iím getting to meet the people. Iím getting to meet the theater owners and Iím taking a hair more responsibility than in the past. I think itís the way of the future.

DRE:I saw the video of you with the cow in Los Angeles on Youtube, are ventures like that something you want to be a part of?

DL:It is whatís just going to happen, but for me, Iím still hanging on to the theatrical experience as the best. But it wonít be too long before there wonít be any DVDs. We will be downloading our films and what you do with it is up to you but I would recommend squirting it on a big wall with speakers in a dark room and seeing it all the way through. Kill the phones so you have that experience and you can go into another world. But a lot of people are going to see it on their phones and their computers but in my book they wonít have seen the film.

DRE:Was it very important to have actors youíve worked with before like Laura [Dern] and Justin [Theroux] in the main roles?

DL:Whatís important is to get the right actors for the roles. If youíve already worked with them, youíve already developed a shorthand and youíre friends but that is not the reason to cast them. But when they marry to the part and youíve got that added bonus, itís beautiful. Laura is in a film thatís considered somewhat strange, but she has given a performance that will rival anything done this year so I hope she fares very well. The danger is that it will take a while to filter into the culture and miss an award but I think sheíll be remembered for her role.

DRE:It is interesting how self-referential the film is. Much of it takes place on a film set, part of the movie is about a director working with actors, part of the movie was shot in Poland and thereís a Polish character in the movie. Do you like putting whatís happening to you right into your movies?

DL:I also went to New York City but no ideas came in New York. You see what I mean? Itís the ideas coming and how one relates to another. You never know whatís going to trigger them or when theyíre going to come. When they come along, then you focus on those and that focus and desire for more brings more in time. So the thing starts growing, you donít know where itís going, it just starts growing. A whole thing comes from Poland and from Hollywood. Now if I hadnít gone to Poland, I donít think Iíd have gotten the Polish idea, but something was happening there. But Iíve gone to other places where somethingís happening but the ideas didnít come.

DRE:What is it you like so much about Los Angeles?

DL:I love the light. I love the feeling. It comes, I think, from the light, maybe more than that. But in LA I get the feeling of all possibilities. A freeing feeling of all possibilities can be gotten.

DRE:You started the short film Rabbits before you finished Inland Empire, did you always intend to put it into Inland?

DL:It started something happening. One thing leads to another, thatís the beautiful thing about the world. So some things you do and thatís it. Some things lead to more and more and more.

DRE:I believe you had some non-professional actors in Inland Empire.

DL:Well there were Polish actors, American actors, professionals and some surprises.

DRE:And regular people?

DL:Regular people, yeah.

DRE:What does putting regular people into your movie do for you?

DL:Everybodyís an actor and they might be bad, but thereís an actor in everybody. So sometimes you meet someone and see that their face would work. If theyíre right for that thing, then thatís what you got to do.

DRE:Would you ever work for a studio again?

DL:Well, I havenít ever worked with a studio, really. But it is like asking, would you ever poke a knife through your chest? Maybe, but I donít think so.

DRE:Are you already doing things for your next project?

DL:No, Iíve got to do this distribution. But Iím longing for the day to start focusing on catching ideas. Maybe Iíll catch them during the distribution thing. Iíve got some ideas for the next one but a lot more has to come.

DRE:I heard a rumor about more Twin Peaks.

DL:No, somebody asked me about that the other night. I donít know where that rumor is coming from.

DRE:Is there material there for a special edition DVD of The Elephant Man?

DL:I donít think so.

DRE:What do you think about the rise of Eli Roth?

DL:Oh, Eliís my buddy. I havenít talked to him in a long time. Eli is a go-getter and heís smart and a good guy. So everybodyís got their own voice but Eli, I guess, is making it happen.

DRE:Do you watch many movies?

DL:No. I donít have time. Iíve got to work.
ďDon't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.Ē - Andy Warhol


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Pozer

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #159 on: December 07, 2006, 03:42:25 PM »
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so i saw INLAND EMPIRE for the 2nd time tonite, again with Lynch, Dern and Theroux in attendance for a Q&A.† i was lucky enough to be able to ask him a question as well as meet mr. Lynch after the film where he signed my Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive DVD's.† i'll be seeing him introduce Vertigo on monday.†

as far as the film goes...† after the first viewing i felt somewhere between taz and samsong.† or maybe i felt both equally as strong.† it was one of the most incredible theatre experiences of my life on a purely viceral level but as a narrative film it was completely incomprehensible.† i thought anyone who would claim to 'get' the film was completely full of shit.† however on 2nd viewing i realized the first viewing as like taking a puzzle out of the box and spilling it onto the floor.† but the 2nd viewing i started to put the pieces together.† i'm still nowhere near completing it but i have started to make connections.†

more later.
nice.  along with p's review, this has fueled my anticipation.

JG

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #160 on: December 07, 2006, 04:12:53 PM »
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DRE:Too many people do that. I asked him if he puts certain things in his movies to tweak the audience and he told me that if he were to do that it would be more like he was tweaking himself. That seems to jibe with what you were saying with just putting something in a film.

DL:Yes, that would be a real false note and I feel like if youíre true to the ideas and you work on it until you realize those ideas and they feel correct based on the idea, then they have a chance of feeling correct for others. Even if youíre going on a intuitive feel, if youíre true to those ideals, sometimes theyíve got these harmonics, if you dick with them, you might ruin the harmonics. They would be bad things and people would start smelling a rat. You may not even understand those harmonics, but somebody out there might and itís true on that level and itís true on the harmonic levels. So youíve got to be real careful.

DRE:Are the harmonics ever not correct?

DL:No, they have to be. If the notes, the chords are correct, the harmonics are going to be correct. But you may not understand the beauty of the harmonics but somebody else might. If youíve been true to these notes, theyíve got a chance to appreciate some other thing. On Eraserhead, I donít remember what it was but I had the feeling that I appreciated some other level of it later, but I wasnít even aware of it when I did it. Itís that thing.


my favorite part, and the difference between lynch and a lot of visual wankers. 

JG

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #161 on: December 08, 2006, 08:02:11 PM »
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the seed has been planted.  there are no words. 

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #162 on: December 08, 2006, 10:52:48 PM »
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I saw this tonight at the Brattle. A guy gave out samples of David Lynch coffee before and I didn't get any.† :(


In Louis BuŮuel's autobiography he said, "Sometimes, watching a film is like being raped." This was that sometimes, and I loved it. Warrants a second viewing like-whoa.

Reinhold

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #163 on: December 08, 2006, 10:59:59 PM »
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i left this film completely satisfied. this is easily the best film i've scene since eyes wide shut.
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

JG

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #164 on: December 08, 2006, 11:01:02 PM »
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I saw this tonight at the Brattle. A guy gave out samples of David Lynch coffee before and I didn't get any.† :(


In Louis BuŮuel's autobiography he said, "Sometimes, watching a film is like being raped." This was that sometimes, and I loved it. Warrents a second viewing like-whoa.

which showing did you go to?† the 430 one was pretty empty, and we didn't get offered any coffee.† but when i left i checked out the line for the 8 oclock show and it looked pretty packed. 

 

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