Author Topic: Robert Altman  (Read 32911 times)

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ono

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #60 on: September 05, 2004, 01:49:22 PM »
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Thanks!  :yabbse-thumbup:  :-D

soixante

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #61 on: September 06, 2004, 03:04:52 AM »
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I just watched Nashville for the umpteenth time the other night.  I first saw it in 1976, as an impressionable youth, and the other night I still discovered small details that I hadn't noticed before.  Quite often Altman's staging and blocking seems like "found behavior," until you study it closely and realize how much effort he puts into both the composition of shots and blocking of actors.  What seems tossed-off and improvised is actually meticulously staged -- it merely feels spontaneous and lifelike.

Then I watched The Company again, and enjoyed it even more on my third viewing.  Some critics have complained that this film has no plot, or very little plot, but I disagree.  Altman embeds plot points, character arcs and other narrative devices in a welter of detail that plays more like pages torn out of a diary than a novel.
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meatball

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #62 on: September 06, 2004, 04:24:32 PM »
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I suppose Altman would work for me if I was interested in the subject matter of his movies (i.e. Nashville). And that's only if there were no documentaries on the same subject matter that I could watch instead. But, really I'd rather not watch something three or four times to finally appreciate it.

Ravi

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #63 on: September 08, 2004, 02:12:02 PM »
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Quote from: meatball
I suppose Altman would work for me if I was interested in the subject matter of his movies (i.e. Nashville). And that's only if there were no documentaries on the same subject matter that I could watch instead. But, really I'd rather not watch something three or four times to finally appreciate it.


You weren't intrigued enough by Nashville to give it one more shot?

meatball

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #64 on: September 08, 2004, 09:28:14 PM »
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Quote from: Ravi
Quote from: meatball
I suppose Altman would work for me if I was interested in the subject matter of his movies (i.e. Nashville). And that's only if there were no documentaries on the same subject matter that I could watch instead. But, really I'd rather not watch something three or four times to finally appreciate it.


You weren't intrigued enough by Nashville to give it one more shot?


Not really.

ębrad

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #65 on: September 08, 2004, 09:31:25 PM »
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Quote from: soixante
I just watched Nashville for the umpteenth time the other night.  I first saw it in 1976, as an impressionable youth, and the other night I still discovered small details that I hadn't noticed before.  Quite often Altman's staging and blocking seems like "found behavior," until you study it closely and realize how much effort he puts into both the composition of shots and blocking of actors.  What seems tossed-off and improvised is actually meticulously staged -- it merely feels spontaneous and lifelike.

Then I watched The Company again, and enjoyed it even more on my third viewing.  Some critics have complained that this film has no plot, or very little plot, but I disagree.  Altman embeds plot points, character arcs and other narrative devices in a welter of detail that plays more like pages torn out of a diary than a novel.


this is all actually very true.

meatwad

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #66 on: October 30, 2004, 03:58:30 PM »
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don't believe anything about this project has been posted yet, so here is an article

Movie is latest news from Lake Wobegon

Plans take shape for 'Prairie Home Companion' filming this winter at Fitzgerald

BY CHRIS HEWITT

Movie Critic

It will not be a quiet week in Lake Wobegon when Meryl Streep, Lily Tomlin, Tom Waits and others hit town to make a film version of "A Prairie Home Companion."

"We are getting the financial pieces in place. Sometimes the partners come, and sometimes the partners go, and you hope it all comes together," said Tony Judge, who has worked on the radio show in a variety of capacities and is coordinating production of the film. "There's every reason to be confident about its getting made."

The plan is for shooting to take place at St. Paul's Fitzgerald Theater.

"We are holding January and February for the film," said Brian Sanderson, general manager of the Fitzgerald.

"We're crossing our fingers and hoping it goes forward."

Plans were still being discussed this week, Sanderson said, but he adds it's getting late to find somebody else to use the theater if the movie doesn't happen: "The closer you get to the date, the less chance there is to find another rental."

The movie would take place as the radio show is being performed, so it would include both onstage performances and behind-thescenes action. Judge said negotiations are ongoing with Waits and Lyle Lovett (who are expected to play cowboys Dusty and Lefty), Streep, Tomlin and other potential cast members (George Clooney has been mentioned as a possibility for tough-guy detective Guy Noir), but none of those actors can be signed until there's a definite start date.

Judge said the script, written by "Prairie" creator Garrison Keillor, has "romance, intrigue, threats. It's a funny film, and I think people who know 'Prairie Home Companion,' and even those who do not, will like it."

The project has been in the talking stages for 18 months or so, Judge said. That's when he introduced Keillor and Robert Altman (whose movies, including "Nashville" and "Gosford Park," have usually centered around a specific community or culture) in Chicago, where Altman was shooting "The Company."

"Altman is a great fan of radio. It was an important force for him as a kid," Judge said, noting that Altman was not a regular "Prairie" listener.

"I think he has become one. He wasn't a great fan of the show, but, over the next few months after they met, he came and saw performances at Town Hall in New York and was out here to see the show, too."

Judge said putting the movie package together has been "fraught with all the difficulties of independent film organization and financing. But it's very exciting, because it's such a good, strong, natural idea. And, beyond the good story and the prominence and popularity of Garrison Keillor and Robert Altman, we have an audience of nearly 4 million people every week across the country who we think we be eager to see a movie called 'A Prairie Home Companion.' "

Some of those listeners may even get a chance to be in the film. Judge said it's too early to know exact details, but, since the film takes place during a performance of the show, audiences will probably be required.

Who knows? If they're lucky, they may even get to sample some Powdermilk Biscuits and Beebopareebop Rhubarb Pie from the film's commissary.

AntiDumbFrogQuestion

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #67 on: October 31, 2004, 01:02:08 PM »
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Thats a GREAT combination!  Two great Ensemble storytellers together.
I've seen their styles as differing, with the more cynical Altman endings compared to the average down-home optimsism of Keilor, but who knows? It may just rock.

Ravi

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #68 on: October 31, 2004, 08:03:57 PM »
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What do you guys think of Secret Honor?  I have read it is basically like a film of a play and a little boring.  Is it worth at least a rental from an Altman/PBH fan?

Stefen

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #69 on: October 31, 2004, 08:41:18 PM »
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PTA talks about it so im sure you will get a resounding yes from these parts. No comment.
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cine

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #70 on: November 01, 2004, 01:39:05 AM »
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Quote from: Ravi
What do you guys think of Secret Honor?  I have read it is basically like a film of a play and a little boring.  Is it worth at least a rental from an Altman/PBH fan?

I bought it and watched it last week. When it comes time to list our favourite films for the Xixax Dekapenticon, I'll be adding Secret Honor this year.

does that answer your question?

Ghostboy

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #71 on: November 01, 2004, 01:51:01 AM »
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Prairie Home Companion rules! That is some great news. Tom Waits and Lyle Lovett were made to appear in a movie about that show (aside from being made to make brilliant music, of course).

soixante

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #72 on: November 05, 2004, 03:20:51 AM »
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Recently, I have re-watched some of Altman's lesser known films.

Fool for Love is the only feature film adaptation of a Sam Shepard play, and it captures Shepard's peculiar setting and world-view.

Then I watched Gingerbread Man for the 3rd time.  It was interesting to see how Altman brought style and atmosphere to Grisham's prosaic legal thriller storyline.  

Kansas City is an overlooked gem, and Altman captures some wonderful jazz performances.

Tanner 88 is out on DVD, and it is well worth viewing, especially in light of the recent election.
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soixante

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #73 on: November 08, 2004, 12:03:48 PM »
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California Split has just been released on DVD, and it is one of Altman's best films.  It is also one of the best films ever made about gambling, alongside The Gambler with James Caan.  Oddly enough, Spielberg was thinking of directing Cal Split before Altman came on board.

California Split reminds me of a Cassavetes film, especially Husbands, with its exploration of male bonding and carousing.  It also shows how obsessive and self-destructive gamblers can be, without resorting to obvious melodrama.  Also, Altman is a gambler himself, so he knows this world on a first-hand basis.
Music is your best entertainment value.

SHAFTR

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Re: Robert Altman
« Reply #74 on: November 08, 2004, 03:03:36 PM »
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I just saw 3 Women, a very non Altmanesque film.  It would make an interesting triple feature with Persona & Mulholland Dr.
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