Author Topic: Peter Weir  (Read 4907 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Finn

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1041
  • Respect: 0
Peter Weir
« on: November 17, 2003, 03:38:41 PM »
0
I always thought Peter Weir was kinda under-rated as a director. He's done plenty of good movies (Fearless is my favorite) but his art really brought a lot to the stories. He'll be coming out with War Magician in 2004.

Complete Filmography:

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003)
Truman Show, The (1998)
Fearless (1993)
Green Card (1990)
 Dead Poets Society (1989)
Mosquito Coast, The (1986)
Witness (1985)
Year of Living Dangerously, The (1982)
Gallipoli (1981)
Plumber, The (1979) (TV)
Last Wave, The (1977)
"Luke's Kingdom" (1976) (mini) TV Series
Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975)
Cars That Ate Paris, The (1974)
Homesdale (1971)
Three to Go (1971) (segment "Michael")
Typical US Mother: "Remember what the MPAA says; Horrific, Deplorable violence is okay, as long as people don't say any naughty words."

The Silver Bullet

  • The Ultimate Boon
  • ***
  • Posts: 585
  • Respect: 0
    • http://esotericrabbit.blogspot.com
Peter Weir
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2003, 05:55:18 PM »
0
Recently, I have been watching more of Peter Weir's stuff, and I'm increasingly impressed. He has a knack for beautiful visuals and wonderfully human stories. God, it sounds like I ripped that off from somewhere...

Anyhow, my favourites are The Truman Show and Gallipoli. And then The Year of Living Dangerously, The Mosquito Coast and Fearless.

It's a nice filmography, his.
RABBIT n. pl. rab·bits or rabbit[list=1]
  • Any of various long-eared, short-tailed, burrowing mammals of the family Leporidae.
  • A hare.
  • [/list:o][/size]

Gloria

  • is secretly Catwoman
  • The Ultimate Boon
  • ***
  • Posts: 468
  • Respect: +2
Peter Weir
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2003, 06:05:36 PM »
0
I really liked The Truman Show, but I was unimpressed with Dead Poet's Society. It was too melodramatic and heavy-handed for me.  Robin Williams was really good in it, though.  He seems to have a very wide spectrum of movies. I have yet to see Fearless and Witness, which I have heard are among his best.

classical gas

  • The Ultimate Boon
  • ***
  • Posts: 586
  • Respect: +31
Peter Weir
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2003, 06:15:13 PM »
0
I agree with Gloria on "Dead Poet's Society"; "The Truman Show" is definitely one of the best films to come out in the last ten years.  It's really underrated, although many here love it.  I find new interesting things in it everytime I watch it.

Also, is "Picnic at Hanging Rock" good?  I've been meaning to see it for a long time.  Is it worth the time?

Finn

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1041
  • Respect: 0
Peter Weir
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2003, 10:15:53 PM »
0
Yeah, Picnic at Hanging Rock is very good. It's one of Weir's earlier films and has a lot of atmosphere that really drives that whole movie. Some say the film takes place in a type of dream where not everything is reality sorta like Eyes Wide Shut.
Typical US Mother: "Remember what the MPAA says; Horrific, Deplorable violence is okay, as long as people don't say any naughty words."

Ghostboy

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 4892
  • Respect: +377
    • http://www.road-dog-productions.com/
Peter Weir
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2003, 11:13:12 PM »
0
Picnic At Hanging Rock is by far my favorite -- see it ASAP. As far as my tastes go, it is followed by Gallipoli and then The Truman Show, but I need to see his Harrison Ford movies. I also think Dead Poets Society is not very good.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Peter Weir
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2003, 11:23:47 PM »
0
Quote from: Gloria
I was unimpressed with Dead Poet's Society. It was too melodramatic and heavy-handed for me.  Robin Williams was really good in it, though.


Quote from: Ghostboy
I also think Dead Poets Society is not very good.


All this time I always thought I was the only one who felt this way.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

SHAFTR

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2337
  • You brought two too many
  • Respect: +4
    • rmlumley.com
Peter Weir
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2003, 11:42:49 PM »
0
I think Dead Poets Society is good.  Hell, it's even referenced in Red.

Truman Show should have been a Best Picture nominee.  It's a film without faults.
"Talking shit about a pretty sunset
Blanketing opinions that i'll probably regret soon"

Weak2ndAct

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1153
  • Self Portrait
  • Respect: +9
Peter Weir
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2003, 12:56:46 AM »
0
Quote from: MacGuffin
Quote from: Gloria
I was unimpressed with Dead Poet's Society. It was too melodramatic and heavy-handed for me.  Robin Williams was really good in it, though.

Quote from: Ghostboy
I also think Dead Poets Society is not very good.

All this time I always thought I was the only one who felt this way.

You are not alone.

I love Weir movies, that one just doesn't do it for me.  I seriously love 'Picnic,' was lucky enough to catch it during the brief re-release years back.  

My favorite has to be 'Fearless.'  What a strange, wonderful movie, I've never seen anything like it.

cine

  • Pretttttyyy, Pretttyyyyy Pretty Good
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 5553
  • Respect: +281
Peter Weir
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2003, 01:22:51 AM »
0
Quote from: Weak2ndAct
Quote from: MacGuffin
Quote from: Gloria
I was unimpressed with Dead Poet's Society. It was too melodramatic and heavy-handed for me.  Robin Williams was really good in it, though.

Quote from: Ghostboy
I also think Dead Poets Society is not very good.

All this time I always thought I was the only one who felt this way.

You are not alone.

I wasn't too fond of it either.

SiliasRuby

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 3071
  • Spits Hyperbole Like Nobody's Business
  • Respect: +2
Pattern Recognition
« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2004, 04:08:01 AM »
0
GIBSON'S PATTERN RECOGNIZED
3.31.04
By Dave Davis
Contributing sources: LA Times, Arkady

Although cinematic adaptations of cyberpunk author William Gibson's works haven't turned out too hot (Johnny Mnemonic, New Rose Hotel), it's always good to hear that someone out there is at least trying to get his stories turned into films.
Already accustomed to weirdness, producer Steve Golin (Being John Malkovich, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) is diving into the odd pool again with the rights to Gibson's latest novel Pattern Recognition. The story follows a modern-day marketing expert trying to learn the origins of a mysterious film and finding herself in the middle of a puzzle involving terrorists, spies and gangsters. Word has it that Master and Commander director Peter Weir is interested in bringing the book to screens.
The Beatles know Jesus Christ has returned to Earth and is in Los Angeles.

When you are getting fucked by the big corporations remember to use a condom.

There was a FISH in the perkalater!!!

My Collection

Pubrick

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12170
  • Lynchian identity mystery
  • Respect: +769
Pattern Recognition
« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2004, 04:47:20 AM »
0
this would so make a great movie.

the film bits especially could be fun, and the chick's a nice character, oh and her director-friend is so Cunningham with the All is Full of Love robot bodies lying around.

tho it could suffer from "boring depiction of computer usage" syndrome, which seems almost inevitable.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Peter Weir
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2004, 01:47:46 PM »
0
Weir Recognizes a Pattern at Warner Bros.
Source: Variety

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World director Peter Weir is attached to direct Pattern Recognition, a thriller at Warner Bros. Weir will co-write the script with David Arata.

The film follows the adventures of a marketing expert who finds herself in a dangerous puzzle when she's hired to track down the source of a strange collection of video footage on the Internet.

William Gibson published the novel last year through Penguin Putnam.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

El Duderino

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1554
  • Respect: +2
Peter Weir
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2004, 01:50:52 PM »
0
that kind of makes me think that if "The Ring" and "Nick of Time" had a baby, this would be it.
Did I just get cock-blocked by Bob Saget?

cine

  • Pretttttyyy, Pretttyyyyy Pretty Good
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 5553
  • Respect: +281
Peter Weir
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2004, 02:11:14 PM »
0
Quote from: El Duderino
that kind of makes me think that if "The Ring" and "Nick of Time" had a baby, this would be it.

Yeah, two movies having sexual intercourse and one of the movies (you know, the one with a uterus attached to one of the reels) giving birth to a child. Exactly.

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy