Author Topic: Nicholas Ray  (Read 3288 times)

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jenkins

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Re: Nicholas Ray
« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2014, 05:31:39 AM »
+3
saw this tonight



and idk that's such a good movie is what i'm saying. it's complex make-believe, and there are some real knockout words that could be used to describe it, why, i think you could inspire a classroom to write essays about this movie. and a movie like this goes mostly quiet through all these years for what reason??? this world is way too difficult, let's all agree

enjoyed it as much as the last dramatic firecracker i watched, edgar ulmer's ruthless, and i adore how in the "old days" they were talented at writing and creating such tidy and fabulous dramas

watched but fell asleep during ray's the savage innocents, which was a personal problem of mine that i hope to remedy in the future, for reasons that must be quite obvious through the synopsis alone:

Quote
An Eskimo who has had little contact with white men goes to a trading post where he accidentally kills a missionary and finds himself being pursued by the police.

yeah. what i saw when my eyes were open, that's some bonkers stuff, and the facts are purely maniacal cinema

Quote
Screenwriter Hans Ruesch never saw an Eskimo, but based his story on the film Eskimo (1933).

tomorrow might/could/should include a planned viewing of run for cover
Every perspective is an act of creation.

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: Nicholas Ray
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2014, 05:24:00 PM »
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Okay, I split that stuff off. Let the topic resume.
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jenkins

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Re: Nicholas Ray
« Reply #17 on: August 27, 2014, 02:55:31 PM »
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the savage innocents:

i quoted imdb's trivia when it said the writer "never saw an eskimo" before writing the script but, then i watched the movie and ray himself is given screenwriting credit

ray himself is credited as the screenwriter for the savage innocents. that fascinates me. seems like he'd truly investigated and/or encountered inuit lifestyles -- there are scenes of spitting in the mouths of seals, offering your wife's intimacy to a friend, spearing walruses, etc -- or read from the three people who'd helped adapt the original book

i believed the eskimo data and i appreciated it being shown to me, but i didn't believe in the hearts of the actors or the general atmosphere of the movie. i think everyone was pretending way too hard. it's nbd nicholas ray, you were trying your best for 1960, and you didn't know the future held atanarjuat

the savage innocents wasn't as good as i hoped/remembered. i cut my time loss to about 37minutes. ~37mins into the savage innocents i decided i'd rather watch something else (yesterday i had a movie day)

should i decide to like or dislike a movie before i see the movie? no! i don't want to do it, it's against my constitution, i'm a goddamn movie person. and i go into the movies to like them. that's how god built me. but so often movies aren't want i want them to be. and so often i like the movie anyway

idk, it's tricky. i'll just keep living and watching movies. i'm practicing movies like a doctor practices medicine. i should google about insurance coverage

hot blood:

this is what i wanted. the savage innocents shaken with party girl, and the result is a movie about gypsy culture

ooh it's so fun. three/four terrific music and dance scenes. blistery characters. i wrote down an exchange:

(emotional moment)
"What's the matter Annie?"
"I don't know. When I find out, I'll tell you."

i actually watched hot blood before rewatching the savage innocents, and one of the reasons in my explanation was "i'd rather rewatch hot blood with my time"
Every perspective is an act of creation.

 

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