Author Topic: Edward Burns  (Read 2287 times)

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aclockworkjj

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Edward Burns
« on: March 27, 2003, 02:27:17 PM »
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Anyone else enjoy Ed Burns films?...Realize I am speaking of only those he wrote and directed...ex. The Brothers McMullen, Sidewalks of New York....not  talking the stupid movie with A. Jolie he did.  

I guess I feel his portrayal of relationships is pretty honest as well as I love the Irish catholic jokes....

Pwaybloe

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Re: Edward Burns
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2003, 03:14:34 PM »
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Quote from: aclockworkjj
Anyone else enjoy Ed Burns films?...Realize I am speaking of only those he wrote and directed...ex. The Brothers McMullen, Sidewalks of New York....not the talking the supid movie with A. Jolie he did.  

I guess I feel his portrayal of relationships is pretty honest as well as I love the Irish catholic jokes....


I liked "She's the One" alot.  

I hated Sidewalks of New York.   He wants to be Woody Allen so bad (with the exception of writing himself as a tough guy all the time), and I think I would have liked it better if I hadn't seen any of Woody's movies.  Watch "Husbands and Wives" and you will see what I mean.

MacGuffin

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Edward Burns
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2005, 12:17:09 AM »
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Burns dusts off tux for indie 'Groomsmen'
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Ed Burns is suiting up to write, direct and star in the indie ensemble film "The Groomsmen," which is being produced through his Marboro Road Gang Prods. and Bauer-Martinez Studios.

Brittany Murphy, John Leguizamo, Jay Mohr, Jessica Capshaw, Matthew Lillard, Heather Burns, John Mahoney and Donal Logue round out the film, which starts shooting today in New York.

The project marks the seventh time Burns will write, direct and star in a film, the others being "The Brothers McMullen," "She's the One," "No Looking Back," "Sidewalks of New York," "Ash Wednesday" and "Looking for Kitty." He is repped by CAA.

The story follows the misadventures and confusion of a groom (Ed Burns) and his four groomsmen the week before a wedding. Wrestling with issues of fatherhood, honesty and growing up, the five thirtysomethings discover their extended adolescence might be finally coming to a close. Ed Burns, his producing partner Aaron Lubin, Margot Bridger and Philippe Martinez are producing.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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modage

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Edward Burns
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2005, 09:36:34 AM »
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i've never heard or no looking back or looking for kitty.  and wasnt ash wednesday straight to video?  how did that happen?  i thought bros. and shes got him enough notice to keep his movies atleast in arthouses?
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Pubrick

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Edward Burns
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2005, 09:42:05 AM »
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heather graham must've rubbed off sum dumb on him.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

NEON MERCURY

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Edward Burns
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2005, 02:50:36 PM »
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burns sucks as an actor/director...
plus he has the third most annoying voice in the usa.

Ravi

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Edward Burns
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2005, 03:17:35 PM »
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Quote from: NEON MERCURY
burns sucks as an actor/director...
plus he has the third most annoying voice in the usa.


The other two being Gilbert Gottfried.

MacGuffin

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Re: Edward Burns
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2007, 05:40:04 PM »
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Ed Burns, Virgin pact on 'Walloper'
Filmmaker makes deal on comic series
Source: Variety
 
Ed Burns is hatching a deal with Virgin Comics for a comic book series that serves as a calling card for a live action feature.

Burns has created "Dock Walloper," a stylized gangster tale set in the 1920s, where Prohibition has created a struggle to control the criminal underworld.

Burns is writing the comic with Jimmy Palmiotti, and it will be drawn by Virgin's in-house artist, Siju Thomas.

Burns has joined a recent trend where actors and filmmakers road-test film concepts in comic book form. Virgin has already worked with John Woo on the comic "Seven Brothers," Nicolas Cage and his son Weston Cage on "Voodoo Child," and Guy Ritchie on "Gamekeeper," the latter of which was just set up for a feature with Warner Bros. and producer Joel Silver. Separately, Dimension Films made a deal to adapt "O.C.T.: Occult Crimes Taskforce," an Image Comics title hatched by Rosario Dawson.

Burns, who'll begin writing the feature script in the fall, saw the comic as a way to transition from indie relationship films to a larger canvas.

"I always wanted to make a film about Irish Americans and New York history, but was looking at an $80 million budget for what is really an esoteric character study," said Burns. "After I saw `Sin City,' I saw how the world can be recreated and then `300' fully convinced me that the way to do it was to green screen the whole thing."

Burns will write himself in to play Mad Dog Madden, a fading crime lord, and he'll look for a star to play the Smith character.

Burns, who just acted in "27 Dresses" for Spyglass and "One Missed Call" for Warner Bros., is prepping for a March start date on "Rainy Dog," a remake of the Japanese gangster film. Kadokawa is financing.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Edward Burns
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2007, 10:19:55 AM »
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Wanna share ear buds?
Director Edward Burns bypasses theaters and video stores and heads straight to iPods for the release of his latest film, 'Purple Violets.'
By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

It's not clear whether "Purple Violets," the new living-and-loving-in-New York film from writer-director Edward Burns, would be a good first-date movie.

As the first full-length feature to premiere exclusively on Apple's iTunes store -- not in theaters -- your date would have to be cool with coming over to watch the movie on your laptop. Or desktop. Or even on the gorgeous little 3-inch by 2-inch screen of your iPod Touch -- since nothing says romance like sharing ear buds.

"You don't need to be sitting in a massive theater to experience two people sitting on a park bench trying to figure their lives out," Burns said in a phone interview. In fact, he reflected, "a lot of my stuff you could almost listen to it as an audio play, there's so much wall-to-wall dialogue."

But hey, if you're going to pay the $14.99 to download the movie, you should probably watch it too. It's full of visually appealing scenes, most of them featuring elegant New York condominiums or Selma Blair. Burns' knack for photographing both is evident even on the playing card-sized iPod.

Still, "Purple Violets' " direct-to-net debut is a melancholy milestone for film lovers.

All nine of Burns' films, going back to his breakout 1995 success "The Brothers McMullen," have seen a limited initial release in New York and Los Angeles. The last time moviegoers in St. Louis got to see a film of his premier there, said Burns, was 1998.

"So any fan of yours that really likes your stuff and wants to see it when it comes out, can't," he said. "We didn't want to go through that again -- the false hope that your movie might be the one in several thousand that does break through."

Releasing a film online eliminates costs associated with printing and distribution, while also making the film available, in essence, everywhere.

On the downside, watching a movie on your iPod -- while it does have some advantages -- is inherently less of what new media strategists call a "lean-back experience" than leaning back in a movie theater seat.

But before we throw any looms into the river, we should acknowledge that very-small-screen viewing is not going away. Netflix began allowing its users to stream some movies this year, and online services like Jaman, CinemaNow, and IndieFlix offer a broad spectrum for streaming or download.

ITunes has a catalog of 500 movie titles, including "The Princess Bride," "Mean Girls" and, more recently, "An Inconvenient Truth." Apple says that top-performing movies like these can be downloaded hundreds of thousands of times, though none has yet broken 1 million.

Eddy Cue, vice president of iTunes, said Apple was not worried about exactly when and under what circumstances people watch downloaded movies, though he did offer long train commutes and the gym as examples. "The important part is that people have a lot less free time," said Cue, which means they are less inclined to plan out exactly when or where, or upon which device they'll do their viewing. "We want to give them as many options as possible."

For its part, the two-hour-long "Purple Violets" is a rather familiar love-and-career story that at times feels more dependent on coincidence than it does on surprise. In an early scene, novelist Patti (Selma Blair) and friend Kate (Debra Messing) happen to be dining in the same restaurant as bestselling thriller writer Brian (Patrick Wilson) and Michael "The Murph" Murphy (Burns), their respective college boyfriends from a decade earlier.

As the story plays out, flames are rekindled and dreams revived. Whatever audiences make of the movie, one thing is sure: The screen may be small, but the production is full of pure cinematic ease -- the kind that allows a book to be written between fade-out and fade-in.

Still, you can see why Apple liked the film. Its mix of wealthy young lawyers and wealthy young artists, and its unending string of plush cribs, seems well suited to the company's carefully cultivated aesthetic -- you know, artsy and hip, but with a dash of world domination. "Is that the ideal way you'd want someone to watch your film?" said Burns of the new iPod. "No. But does it look pretty" -- uh, darn -- "good?"

And he's right -- all you have to do is get over the idea that that's a movie screen in your pocket.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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