Author Topic: Guillermo Del Toro  (Read 10904 times)

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MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2007, 06:39:51 PM »
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Guillermo Del Toro's 3993 Details...
Source: ShockTillYouDrop.com

They're not technically tied together narratively-speaking, but Guillermo Del Toro's grim The Devil's Backbone and adult fairy tale Pan's Labyrinth are most certainly considered companion pieces. A third film to round out what Del Toro is calling a "trilogy" (beginning with the aforementioned two films), 3993, is in the early stages with The Orphanage's Sergio Sánchez writing.

"It's going to be shot in Spanish language," Sanchez tells ShockTillYouDrop.com while out on an "Orphanage" press tour. "It's also a fantasy film with the Spanish Civil War in the background. It's the two time periods where the movie takes place. It's starts in 1993 and then there's something that happened in '39 that's relevant to the story."

"Right now they're re-opening many graves from the Civil War, many people who disappeared and now enough time has past so they're re-opening [the graves] and there's a lot of people who can finally find their ancestors and stuff. So [the story] deals with that and if I tell you any more Guillermo will come and slit my tongue," he laughs.

Sanchez says a draft has been completed. When Del Toro heads to London to begin post-production on his "Hellboy" sequel later next month, Sanchez will reunite with the director to begin a polish on the script.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2007, 02:25:13 PM »
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EXCL: Del Toro Hates!
Source: JoBlo.com 

Guillermo Del Toro has set up a new movie at Universal which he will direct, entitled HATERS. The film will be based on the book 'Hater' by David Moody, author of the 'August' series. Here's the skinny: Society is rocked by a sudden increase in the number of violent assaults on individuals. Christened 'Haters' by the media, the attackers strike without warning. Their attacks are brutal, remorseless and extreme. There are no apparent links between the Haters or their victims and no obvious reason for their violence. In seconds rational, controlled people become vicious killers. Everyone - irrespective of race, gender, age, sexuality or any other imaginable difference - has the potential to become either a Hater or a victim. This is a terror which knows no boundaries. You can no longer trust anyone, no matter how well you think you know them. You can no longer trust yourself. By the end of today you could be a killer. By the end of today you could be dead. Psychos? Check. Blood? Check. Sounds like a perfect Del Toro vehicle, no? As we know, the next feast of awesome he will be serving up will be the much-anticipated (by me at least) sequel to HELLBOY; THE GOLDEN ARMY. Pretty much everything this guy does lately is way bad ass, so there's no reason to think this thing won't be.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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hedwig

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2007, 04:19:23 PM »
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i hate the title. del toro should skip that and just adapt one of fernando's dreams instead.

if i had to choose between one of these del toro book adaptations i would take Frankenstein. i think del toro could possibly do for that story what peter jackson did for king kong.

and then lovecraft.

MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2008, 01:07:14 AM »
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Del Toro books vampire deal
'Hobbit' director to co-write trilogy of novels
Source: Variety

As if Guillermo del Toro weren't busy enough, the director has inked a publishing deal with HarperCollins imprint William Morrow to pen a trilogy of vampire thrillers with Chuck Hogan.

First book, "The Strain," hits bookstores next summer.

Story will revolve around an invasion of New York City by a vampiric virus. Series will trace the roots of the vampiric race back to its Old Testament origins.

The books will be published by HarperCollins in the U.K., and a special edition will be published simultaneously by the company's Spanish-language imprint, Rayo, in the U.S.

Del Toro is currently readying to direct New Line and MGM's "The Hobbit," to which he has committed the next five years.

He's essentially booked through 2017, attached to helm a remake of "Frankenstein," "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," and "Slaughterhouse-Five" at Universal, as well as "Drood," based on Dan Simmons' novel.

Hogan has penned the thrillers "The Standoff," "The Blood Artists" and "The Killing Moon." Warner Bros. recently picked up his book "Prince of Thieves" for Ben Affleck to helm and star.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2008, 12:36:44 AM »
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Guillermo del Toro plots 'Pinocchio'
Producer, Henson Co. teaming for feature
Source: Variety

Guillermo del Toro's developing "Pinocchio" as a stop-motion feature with the Jim Henson Co. as a darker version of the original fairy tale.

Project will be produced by JHC co-toppers Brian Henson and Lisa Henson along with senior VP Jason Lust. Del Toro will exec produce.

Del Toro's working on the screenplay with Gris Grimley, who illustrated a 2002 version of "Pinocchio." Grimley and Adam Parrish King will co-direct the film.

Del Toro disclosed the project in an interview with the website bloodydisgusting.com and said that it would take about three years to complete.

Pinocchio first appeared in the 19th Century book "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. Walt Disney produced the first feature version of the story with his animated "Pinocchio" in 1940.

"Pinocchio" is the latest in a long list of projects to which del Toro's attached. Top priority is New Line and MGM's "The Hobbit," the two-picture project he's committed the next five years to as director and co-writer with Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens.

He also has a three-year first-look deal with Universal, where he's setting up remakes of "Frankenstein," "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" and "Slaughterhouse-Five" and an adaptation of "Drood" and several other projects
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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cron

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2008, 10:58:09 AM »
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so he made pan's labyrinth and said ' fuck it, i'll never again have original thoughts for the rest of my life' ? there's lies in what i'm saying but c'mon, we're always bitching about hollywood and the lack of ideas and this guy wants to remake book adaptations. huge yawn.
context, context, context.

MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2008, 07:36:34 PM »
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Exclusive: Cuaron Talks The Witches
Guillermo del Toro to direct Dahl redo
Source: Empire
 
Empire got the exclusive low down Alfonso Cuaron's involvement in The Witches, in what could be the most interesting and worthwhile re-adaptation of a classic children's book following a decent initial film, well, ever.

Although it was rumoured that Cuaron was down to direct, it seems that he will instead be producing,  while legend-in-the-making Guillermo Del Toro will take the helm.

The pair were discussing the potential of adapting the much naughtier Dahl story Uncle Oswald, when the conversation turned to The Witches. Cuaron told us:  "Guillermo wrote this amazing screenplay really quickly."

He also said that, "It won’t be like the original Nicolas Roeg version, which was a beautiful film," because (and this is the very exciting part), del Toro plans to "do it completely in stop-motion animation." We will just have to wait and see how they could ever replace Roeg's army of cross-dressing bald-headed extras, however.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2008, 06:18:33 PM »
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Report: Del Toro won't make another film in Mexico
Source: AP

MEXICO CITY - " Hellboy " director Guillermo del Toro says he is unlikely to make another film in Mexico because his father's kidnapping 10 years ago left him fearing for his safety, a newspaper reported Thursday.

Del Toro's father was eventually released, but the family says it later received death threats .

Del Toro said he does not feel safe directing films here because his daily routine becomes public.

"Not all of the people who participated in the kidnapping were captured," El Universal newspaper quoted him as saying.

He described his situation as a "forced exile" and said it saddens him to think he may never film again on Mexican streets.

Del Toro spoke on the red carpet of a special Mexico City showing of the film " Rudo y Cursi ," which he co-produced. He currently lives in New Zealand, where he has signed on to direct " The Hobbit ."

Yotzmit Rami, a spokeswoman for Universal Pictures , which organized del Toro's trip, said he would not be available for further comment.

Mexico has one of the highest kidnapping rates in the world. The government, however, says abductions have fallen 18 percent to about 72 a month since governors, mayors and federal officials signed a national security accord to battle crime in August.

Reliable data is hard to come by because most abductions go unreported for fear of police involvement. The nonprofit Citizens' Institute for Crime Studies estimates the real kidnapping rate is about 500 per month.

Del Toro is best known for directing the "HellBoy" movies and " Pan's Labyrinth ," which won an Oscar for best cinematography .
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Stefen

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2008, 12:13:15 AM »
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Mexico is all fucked up.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.

MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #24 on: May 28, 2009, 09:07:24 PM »
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New video trailer for Guillermo del Toro's vampire novel The Strain

A "trailer" has gone live for the first volume of Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan's The Strain trilogy of vampire novels, which hit bookstores on Tuesday

Here's how Amazon.com describes the first book:

"Boeing 777 arrives at JFK and is on its way across the tarmac, when it suddenly stops dead. All window shades are pulled down. All lights are out. All communication channels have gone quiet. Crews on the ground are lost for answers, but an alert goes out to the CDC. Dr. Eph Goodweather, head of their Canary project, a rapid-response team that investigates biological threats, gets the call and boards the plane. What he finds makes his blood run cold.

"In a pawnshop in Spanish Harlem, a former professor and survivor of the Holocaust named Abraham Setrakian knows something is happening. And he knows the time has come, that a war is brewing ...

"So begins a battle of mammoth proportions as the vampiric virus that has infected New York begins to spill out into the streets. Eph, who is joined by Setrakian and a motley crew of fighters, must now find a way to stop the contagion and save his city—a city that includes his wife and son—before it is too late."



http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1813626064?bctid=24409737001
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2010, 01:19:36 PM »
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Guillermo del Toro near monster-sized deal for new horror flick
Source: SciFi Wire

A monster-sized deal is in the works for the Frankenstein-esque film Splice, thanks to the Sundance Film Festival, according to Deadline.com. Two weeks after the film premiered at Sundance, producer Joel Silver's Dark Castle is in the final stages of closing a huge distribution deal, which includes a wide summer release on 3,000 screens and a marketing commitment somewhere between $25 million and $40 million.

Splice, a tale of genetic mutation gone wrong, stars Adrien Brody (King Kong) and Sarah Polley (Dawn of the Dead) as two scientists who combine human and animal DNA to create a new creature. The Cube's Vincenzo Natali directed the film, with executive producer Guillermo del Toro guiding the project for over a year.

Sundance often generates film offers, but usually at $5 million or less. While the megabucks potential for Splice is huge, the Dark Castle deal is not the first deal via Sundance that Splice has been close to having. We'll have to wait and see if it goes through.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Fernando

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2010, 02:11:03 PM »
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Guillermo del Toro’s Top 10 Criterions
In compiling his top ten Criterions, Cronos director Guillermo del Toro had a hell of a time limiting himself. Del Toro humorously bemoaned the “unfair, arbitrary, and sadistic top ten practice,” so instead he decided on ties or rather, “thematic/authorial pairings.”



01.1 Throne of Blood - Kurosawa


01.2 High and Low - Kurosawa


01.3 Ran - Kurosawa

Kurosawa’s being one of the essential masters is best represented by these, his most operatic, pessimistic, and visually spectacular films. Try and guess which is which. How he managed to be both exuberant and elegant at the same time will be one of life’s great mysteries.




02.1 The Seventh Seal - Bergman


02.2 Fanny and Alexander (Theatrical version) - Bergman

Bergman as a fabulist—my favorite—is absolutely mesmerizing. These two films have the primal pulse of a children’s fable told by an impossibly old and wise narrator. Fanny and Alexander is Dickens, Hans Christian Andersen, and John Calvin rolled into one. Both tales are ripe with fantastical imagery and a sharp sense of the uncanny. Also, I am often surprised at how the humor and comedic elements in The Seventh Seal seem to be overlooked in favor of its reputation as a quintessential “serious” art film.




03.1 Beauty and the Beast - Jean Cocteau


03.2 Eyes without a face - Georges Franju

Beauty and the Beast may be tenuous and delicate where Eyes Without a Face is overripe and pulpish, but these films are gorgeous, dark poems about fragility and horror. Both fables depend on sublime, almost ethereal, imagery to convey a sense of doom and loss: mad, fragile love clinging for dear life in a maelstrom of darkness. The clash of haunting and enchanting imagery has seldom been more powerful. Eyes Without a Face boasts an extraordinary soundtrack too!




04.1 Great Expectations - David Lean


04.2 Oliver Twist - David Lean

Most people remember David Lean for his big-scale epics, like Doctor Zhivago, Lawrence of Arabia, or The Bridge on the River Kwai. But here he is at his most precise and poetic. Both movies are epics of the spirit, and both are plagued by grand, utterly magical moments and settings; whether showing Oliver’s mother straining and in pain, by intercutting with a flexing branch of thorns, or by lovingly lingering on Miss Havisham’s decaying splendor, Lean understand the need for hyperbole in order to manage the larger-than-life Dickensian archetypes. Some of the passages in both films skate the fine line between poetry and horror.




05.1 Time Bandits - Terry Gilliam


05.2 Brazil - Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam is a living treasure, and we are squandering him foolishly with every film of his that remains unmade. Proof that our world is the poorer for this can be found in two of his masterpieces. Gilliam is a fabulist pregnant with images—exploding with them, actually—and fierce, untamed imagination. He understands that “bad taste” is the ultimate declaration of independence from the discreet charm of the bourgeoisie. He jumps with no safety net and drags us with him into a world made coherent only by his undying faith in the tale he is telling. Brazil remains one of the most important films of my life, and Time Bandits is a Roald Dahl–ian landmark to all fantasy films. Seeing Time Bandits with my youngest daughter just two weeks ago, I was delighted when she laughed and rejoiced at the moment when Kevin’s parents explode into a cloud of smoke.




06.1 Onibaba - Kaneto Shindo

(Tied with Kuroneko.) Horrors and desire, death and lust go hand in hand in Onibaba and Kuroneko, a perverse, sweaty double bill from Kaneto Shindo. I saw these two films at age ten, and they did some serious damage to my psyche. Both are perfect fables rooted in Japanese folklore but distinctly modern in their approach to violence and sexuality. As exuberant and exquisite as a netsuke carving, these atmospheric jewels show mankind trapped in a cosmically evil world. The tales seem to fit together so perfectly that they fuse into one as time goes by. Onibaba and Kuroneko make a perfect double bill for the second circle of hell.




07.1 Spartacus - Kubrick


07.2 Paths of glory - Kubrick

Kubrick was a fearsome intellect. His approach to filmmaking and storytelling remains as mysterious as it is compelling. The illusion of control over the medium is total. Both films speak eloquently about the scale of a man against the tide of history, and both raise the bar for every “historical” film to follow. Paths of Glory is a searing indictment of the war machine, as pertinent now as it was in its day. I suspect, however, that Kubrick was also a highly instinctive director, and that he grasped incessantly for his films. An anecdote tells us of him begging Kirk Douglas to stay in bed a few more days after an accident, because Kubrick was using the “downtime” to understand the film they were making.




08.1 Sullivan's Travel - Preston Sturges


08.2 Unfaithfully Yours - Preston Sturges

The candle that burns twice as bright burns half as long, as the saying goes—and Sturges’s films and meteoric, puzzling career confirm this. These are masterful films full of mad energy and fireworks, but Sullivan’s Travels also manages to encapsulate one of the most intimate reflections about the role of the filmmaker as entertainer. Many have attempted to mine the same field as Sturges, and all have failed. A rara avis in the landscape of film.




09.1 Vampyr - Carl Th. Dreyer


09.2 Häxan - Benjamin Christensen

Sheer terror and sheer poetry, but both stem from distinctive medieval traditions. Häxan is the filmic equivalent of a hellish engraving by Bruegel or a painting by Bosch. It’s a strangely titillating record of sin and perversity that is as full of dread as it is of desire and atheistic conviction, and a condemnation of superstition that is morbidly in love with its subject. Vampyr is, strictly speaking, a memento mori, a stern reminder of death as the threshold of spiritual liberation. Like any memento mori, the film enthrones the right morbid imagery (skull, scythe, white limbo) in order to maximize the impact of the beautiful, almost intangible images that conclude it. If only Criterion had acquired my commentary track—sigh—from the UK edition.




10.1 The Spirit of the Beehive - Victor Erice


10.2 The Night of the Hunter - Charles Laughton

The two supreme works of childhood/horror. Lamentations of worlds lost and the innocents trapped in them. Sublime fairy tales of despair that depict the adult world as a toxic environment for kids to exist in. Secret treasures kept in the hearts of children must be safeguarded from the corruption of an adult world full of certainty and arrogance. Both films are so beautiful and so dark—they truly make me weep in awe.


http://www.criterion.com/explore/125-guillermo-del-toros-top-10

MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2012, 07:55:04 PM »
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Guillermo del Toro to Direct 'Beauty and the Beast' Tale for Warner Bros.
Emma Watson is attached to star in "Beauty," one of many projects del Toro is pursuing
Source: THR

Guillermo del Toro is attached to direct Beauty, a new take on the Beauty and the Beast tale set up at Warner Bros. Harry Potter actress Emma Watson is attached to star. At the same time, the studio has hired Andrew Davies to write the script.

The deal has been in the works since last spring, when del Toro first began working with producers Denise De Novi and Alison Greenspan on a take. The project was initially an adaptation of the novel Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of the Beauty and the Beast by Robin McKinley but it has evolved since. Watson came on board last summer but it was always a question whether del Toro would act as a producer or join the project as a director as well.

Del Toro has a tendency to take on many projects at a time. The filmmaker, who is currently shooting Pacific Rim in Toronto, is a consultant for DreamWorks Animation and is directing Trollhunters for the studio. He also is developing a Haunted Mansion movie at Disney and is attached to direct both a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and a Frankenstein project at Universal. 

Davies is a British scribe who’s worked on all three Bridget Jones’ Diary movies as well as last year’s The Three Musketeers.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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polkablues

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2012, 09:45:33 PM »
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Just throw it on the pile, Guillermo.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

MacGuffin

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #29 on: April 25, 2013, 09:25:57 PM »
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Guillermo Del Toro Is Hatching A ‘Monster’ Of A Series At HBO
BY MIKE FLEMING JR | Deadline

EXCLUSIVE: HBO and Guillermo del Toro are teaming on Monster, developing a potential series culled from a series of 18 volumes of Japanese Manga by author Naoki Urasawa published by Shogakukan Inc. Del Toro will co-write the story with Steven Thompson, best known for his work on Dr. Who and Sherlock. Thompson will write the pilot, which del Toro intends to direct. The thriller is about the worldwide search by a young doctor for the most evil sociopath that has ever lived. He is a 12-year-old boy, and the doctor’s decision to save his life has unwittingly unleashed a Pandora’s Box that leaves the doc battling to stop a plot of mass genocide. This is certainly a departure for HBO, entering the Manga game, but for del Toro and Thompson, it allows them an incredible sandbox to play in. Del Toro will be executive producer and Thompson co-executive producer, with Angry Films’ partners Don Murphy and Susan Montford executive producing with Exile’s Gary Ungar. Shogakukan will be consulting producer.

This project was originally set at New Line, but proved too sprawling to confined to a feature film. It took del Toro a long time to woo creator Urasawa into being comfortable with Hollywood again, which sounds a lot like the process that D.B. Weiss and David Benioff went through with George R.R. Martin before they could get Game Of Thrones off the ground at HBO.

Speaking of that, Monster reunites del Toro with Murphy and Montford, his accomplices in the attempt to turn the H.P. Lovecraft novella At The Mountains Of Madness into a feature film. That ended with Universal getting very close to production — with del Toro directing and Tom Cruise ready to star — only to call a halt because del Toro would not budge on the possibility that the film might come in with an R rating. Well, I believe the filmmaker has again raised the issue with Universal, after that studio just had a global hit with Cruise in the sci-fi film Oblivion. Now, the R rating might again be a sticking point, but this becomes even more tantalizing if del Toro’s upcoming film Pacific Rim is as big as people suspect it will be this summer for Warner Bros and Legendary Pictures. Those parties are said to be interested if Universal brass is still uncomfortable making a $150 million R-rated 3D movie. Del Toro wouldn’t be able to make it until after he directs his ghost story Crimson Peak, but it seems inevitable. It would be nice to see such a creative filmmaker get to make his passion project. Del Toro is repped by WME and Exile.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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