Author Topic: Guillermo Del Toro  (Read 10902 times)

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MacGuffin

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Guillermo Del Toro
« on: February 28, 2003, 02:21:35 AM »
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Guillermo del Toro Helming Wind in the Willows

Guillermo del Toro (Blade II has signed on to write and is attached to direct a new live-action and CGI feature version of The Wind in the Willows for Disney, reports Variety. del Toro will pen "Willows" with Matthew Robbins, with whom he collaborated on his 1997 horror film Mimic.

The production's budget is expected to be extensive, considering the amount of special effects the project will require. The film's talking animals will likely be computer-generated. Del Toro had been involved with supervising development prior to committing to write and direct.

del Toro is in production on his long-in-the-works pet project Hellboy for a 2004 release and is also writing the epic horror pic At the Mountains of Madness for DreamWorks, based on the H.P. Lovecraft novel, which he will also direct.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Killing on Carnival Row
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2006, 12:26:03 AM »
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Del Toro takes gander at NL's 'Carnival Row'
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Guillermo del Toro is in negotiations to develop and direct "Killing on Carnival Row," a dark fantasy for New Line Cinema. Arnold and Anne Kopelson are producing via their Kopelson Entertainment banner. Set in a mystical and dark city filled with humans, fairies and other creatures, the story centers on a police detective investigating a series of murders against the fairies. The detective becomes the prime suspect and must find the real killer to clear his name. The studio picked up "Carnival" as a spec by first-time writer Travis Beacham in November.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Killing on Carnival Row
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2006, 02:24:30 PM »
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that sounds AWESOME.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2006, 06:48:37 PM »
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Gawd, I hope that Del Toro doesn't resort to doing that Halo movie to secure funding for Hellboy 2.  I think he's the best genre director working right now, and it would be a shame for him to go that route.  Fingers crossed for Carnival Row and/or just about any project that isn't Halo.
Please don't correct me. It makes me sick.

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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2006, 11:25:13 AM »
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Del Toro presses play on "Sundown" game

Mexican director Guillermo del Toro is helping to develop a video game in which players will have to survive an apocalypse that leaves a world infected with zombies and other potentially fatal horrors.

He has partnered on "Sundown" with Terminal Reality, home of the BloodRayne franchise, which originated the property and will develop the game for next-generation platforms.

Del Toro, who described himself as a lifelong avid gamer, said he did want merely to attach his name to the game.
 
"I believe in the next 10 years, narrative media is going to shift to a hybrid of video games and movies," he said. "This is a great opportunity for me to help be a bridge to what I believe is the future."

Players will start as a typical person on an average day. As everything goes terribly wrong, in order to survive they must learn to form alliances with various beings and to change their role as each new challenge calls for different abilities.

"We want to create a real beginning, middle and end to the game and to each set piece of the game too," said del Toro, who owns the television and movie rights. "I want to make some of the atmospheric elements in the game very, very scary."

Del Toro's directing credits include "Hellboy" and its upcoming sequel, as well as "Blade II," "Mimic" and "Cronos."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2006, 11:31:23 AM »
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Del Toro's directing credits include "Hellboy" and its upcoming sequel
can you count something as a credit if it hasn't been made yet?
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

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Deadman
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2006, 01:04:48 AM »
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'Deadman' to live again on big screen
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Guillermo del Toro is teaming up with Don Murphy's Angry Films to bring cult DC Comics superhero "Deadman" to the big screen.

Del Toro is in negotiations to develop the comics-to-film adaptation, which would be produced by del Toro, Murphy and Susan Montford.

Deadman is the ghost of a circus acrobat named Boston Brand, who was murdered during a trapeze performance. His spirit was granted the power by a Hindu goddess to possess any living being in order to find his killer. In the ensuing search, Brand finds himself obliged to help others. The hero was created in 1967 by Arnold Drake and Carmine Infantino and is known for a run of issues by artist Neal Adams.

A search for writers is under way.
 
"I have been producing features for first- and second-timers in Spain and Latin America, and I would to do the same here," del Toro said in an interview. "If there is a window and an opportunity, I could end up directing but right now, I am only producing."

About the superhero, del Toro said: "(Deadman) has great supernatural elements and is one of the more off-kilter superheroes. What I like is that it has some of the canon of horror films but it has a quest and the heroics in the more traditional superhero roots. It's a great combination that is not very common to superheroes."

Dan Lin is overseeing for the studio. Gregory Noveck oversees for DC Comics.

Angry Films is in post on "Shoot 'Em Up," an action movie starring Clive Owen, and is one of the companies behind Michael Bay's "Transformers."

Del Toro will be at San Diego Comic-Con International talking about his upcoming fantasy film "Pan's Labyrinth," which opens Dec. 29 in North America. He is attached to direct "Hellboy 2" and "Killing on Carnival Row."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2006, 11:54:47 PM »
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Del Toro goes small screen for deal at Fox
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Filmmaker Guillermo Del Toro is crossing over to television with an overall deal at 20th Century Fox Television.

Under the one-year deal, Del Toro, known for such sci-fi/fantasy features as "Hellboy" and "Blade II," will develop and executive produce one-hour series projects for the studio.

He plans to write or co-write a drama for the studio. He also is set to direct a one-hour pilot.

"He is the pre-eminent genre writer-director in the feature world," 20th TV president Gary Newman said of Del Toro. "When you sit in a room with him and see how wildly imaginative he is, you know you're going to get projects that are unique."

Del Toro said he has been thinking about venturing into television for the past three to five years.

"I have felt very clearly that some of the best writing and character development is happening on television," he said. "I also feel that the future of storytelling will require knowledge and practice in the video game arena and in the television cable area."

Del Toro has a strong personal connection to the TV medium dating back to his childhood in Mexico, where he said his storytelling style was shaped by watching such American series as "Night Gallery," "Kolchak: The Night Stalker" and "The Twilight Zone."

Today, his favorite TV series include ABC's "Desperate Housewives" and "Lost," Fox's "The Simpsons" and "24," FX's "Nip/Tuck" and HBO's "Deadwood."

In his own development, "I would love to do genre projects that keep the more conventional genre elements very loose," Del Toro said.

He is looking to introduce fantasy elements to such traditional series genres as police drama.

"I really think my main desire here is to learn and to be as experimental as possible," Del Toro said.

In staffing his projects, Del Toro said he would be "as diverse as possible." He said he is looking to bring on board as many Latino behind-the-camera talent as he can.

Del Toro's most recent feature, "Pan's Labyrinth," had its premiere in May at the Festival de Cannes. It is slated for release Dec. 29.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2006, 12:19:23 PM »
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Exclusive Interview: GUILLERMO DEL TORO ON PAN'S LABYRINTH, FASCISM AND BEING A LEADER
BLADE 2 director speaks his mind about politcs, HELLBOY and inspiration 
Source: iF Magazine

Cannes is the biggest public relations event in the world. You have a myriad of press coming from far places such as India and New Zealand and the usual press junketers from France, US, Spain, UK, etc. In this mad zoo one can easily forget about a picture screened; especially when you watch an average of 10 to 15 films, or portions of films a day! But once you’ve seen the mesmerizing and disturbing PAN’S LABYRINTH (U.S. release is in December) by director Guillermo Del Toro, you will understand why it must be digested more than once to get the full effect. iF got Del Toro to explain this labor of love that has haunted him well before he even directed the legendary CRONOS and HELLBOY.

iF MAGAZINE: It seems like all your movies start with drawings, actually I remember interviewing you for MIMIC in New York, and you showed me drawings  for PAN’S LABYRINTH.  What is the drawing that triggered the movie that you finally directed?

DEL TORO: Actually before any drawing, the first thing that triggered this film was my childhood when I was at my grandmother’s house. At night, every night, a goat man would come out of the closet in my bedroom! This fear, these images of the “goat man” gave birth many years after to a drawing of what was to become “Pan” the main character of my new film: PAN’S LABYRINTH.  Also, the paintings of Goya were an inspiration for me in terms of the tone and atmosphere I wanted for this picture. Actually, my love for drawing and painting is funny because I truly feel lately that I’m starting to lose interest with filmmaking. Especially the difficulty you face to put together films in this ever-changing economical environment. So I think that maybe, when it becomes impossible for me to direct, that I will go back to school and learn all the techniques to paint and become a painter full time.

iF: Do you believe the difficulties in financing a movie would make you give up filmmaking?

DEL TORO: Well for me, who needs more and more financing for my ever complicated pictures and tales, it is really hard to be happy about directing because you face more and more executives who tell you what to do and you need to bend your creativity to their business plan. It is so easy to castrate imagination by arguing how much a film is going to cost and not guarantee a profit. So, maybe for me it’s the solution, to have my own gallery, to express my imagination in paintings, I fully control and create according to my own visions.

iF: To go back to PAN’S LABYRINTH, how affected were you by the fascism in Spain and the ruling of Franco? It seems to be the shape and core of your film?

DEL TORO: Well, even though I’m from Mexico, from Guadalajara; the ripple of Franco was felt. In the 1930’s, when he did his “coup d’Etat,” all the rest of Europe let Franco do what he wanted to do because they knew he was going to be allied with Hitler. So they were scared to anger these two countries that they already feared. Especially in America, they totally ignored the situation in Spain. Then the World War II started and finally people in Europe started to pay attention. But it was too late. And during that time, when some people in Spain were rebelling against Franco, the only country that helped this movement of rebellion was Mexico! Many Spaniards were able to escape and come live in Mexico. Besides, their Spanish culture is still felt today in the arts and especially in films. Many critics, writers, actors, set designers and a historian who was kind of my mentor, all of them came from Spain and established themselves in Mexico and greatly developed the film industry there.

iF: I see lots of parallels with the fascism of the 1930’s and today in many places in the world, what are your thoughts about that?

DEL TORO: Well, you’re right. Because fascism, as I try to say in my movie, always hides behind ideas that are beautiful. Hitler talked about the purity of the Aryan race and how he wanted to construct the perfect world with major cities inhabited by people who live like gods. And maybe that sounds very good but in order to achieve that he wanted to kill everyone who was not perfect. And it’s the same with Franco.

That’s why the character played by Sergio Lopez says: “I want a new Spain, a clean Spain for my son to live in.” This is truly insanity speaking. What is scary is that today you hear similar “messages” by some people all over the world. I heard it recently in Spain from the mouth of some right wing guy. I think that from the moment you start to look at “them” and “us” instead of “all of us together”, that’s when things get f**ked up!

iF: There is also a recurring theme in all your movies about the manipulation of the soul, you should stand and fight back and never give up. Is this what is most important to you, to inspire people about fighting and not giving up?

DEL TORO: Absolutely, you should never give up in life, no matter what and how much pain you face. Actually, being raised a Catholic I have always wondered what has been the highest manifestation of the soul, what really makes us human. In every movie I make, I wonder about the human condition and how we can keep our humanity. You can see it in MIMIC or HELLBOY more than any other movies. And here too, it’s about how we can stay human beings; we can keep our soul in spite of people trying to eradicate any trace of humanity on Earth. It’s about having the freedom of choice and re-conquering that freedom if you lose it. The struggle of the soul is to do the things that you feel is right and not choosing what is convenient.

For example, even me as a filmmaker I struggle with my decisions. After BLADE 2 and HELLBOY, I could have made $20 million plus and get a fat check, but instead I felt that I needed to tell this story in PAN’S LABYRINTH; a story about the fight of soul to stay free by all means. With this film I didn’t become rich on the outside but on the inside, there were things I had to say and I became rich emotionally. That is the essence and struggle of the soul. The essence and nature of Life is to struggle and come to peace with your inner struggle. This is a brave thing to face your choices and do the right things in life. This is why I think Ofelia is the bravest of all in this picture because she does choose to do the right thing even though her life is in danger.  All the other characters compromise but Ofelia never compromises.

iF: There is another theme in this film and it’s the one of family. How important is it to have a family and how hard it is to keep it together. Was it another choice, to talk about “family values?”

DEL TORO: Yes. I’m somebody who truly lives for his family, they are my blood, my inspiration and I would give everything for their health and future. I think I put my vision of what is a family in all my movies. For me a perfect family is a family that is NOT trying to be perfect. It’s a family that even if its f**ked up, can accept it and deal with it. This is true for most of the families in the world. We all have issues, problems, whatever and our job is to try to deal with them in a loving way, in an understanding fashion. And it’s always about trying to find a solution.

For example, in MIMIC the main female character cannot have a kid and so after all the traumas of the movie she is facing, at the end, her solution is to adopt a little boy. In BLADE 2, you have a horrible relationship with the father and the son but they are dealing with it, in a deadly way … family is what we make of it, not necessarily what we are born with.

iF: It’s the notion that in life we don’t choose at the beginning of our existence but that eventually we free ourselves to the point where we become a maker of our destiny. In other words, do you think we could say that we’re born with a fate, and die with a destiny?

DEL TORO: It’s absolutely true! I think that the character of Ofelia in my film expresses totally what you’re talking about. She is the daughter of a tailor but she is trying to become a Princess. And you’re only a princess if you behave like one, you have to be noble and humble and strong and just, all at once. You need to have a pure heart. Any dream you have in life you have to fight for it and go for it, this is how you achieve your destiny and deliver yourself from your fate, that initial life that was given to you but you did not choose it. To do that right you need to do it with heart, not greed.

There is a Basque poem that says: “He was such a poor man that all he could have was money!” We live in a world, a society that makes you believe you need the big house, the big car, and the big bank account. But truly what you need is love and love you cannot buy. In my films I always try to be spiritually inspiring and this is also true with PAN’S LABYRINTH.  I think this particular movie stands on its own because it’s the only one that is full of love from the beginning to the end.

iF: Listening to you, I feel you’re a true politician in the Greek sense of the term: working for the people. Is this what you’re trying to achieve with your films, becoming a political, spiritual leader? Do you think that we can say that there is some sense of political awakening today in the film Industry with pictures like WHO KILLED THE ELECTRIC CAR and AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH?

DEL TORO: Yes, I think there is some sort of new current in Hollywood and around the world where people are tired of being lied to. Therefore more and more people will make films like the ones you just mentioned. But I’m not trying to be any type of leader, I just hope I inspire some people to stand up and fight for what they believe in. You know the essence of nature is cycle and I’m not sure we will ever stop fighting each other.

Right now we are indeed in a f**king far right, politically speaking, cycle! And it’s sad. But it will change sooner or later. You will see more and more people reacting, with movies, with speeches. Now we are in a cycle where people want to say: “F**k you! F**k The Man! F**k the establishment!” so we will swing back to another cycle. It never ends. It’s like the yin always fighting the yang, light always fighting darkness.

iF: In spite of this endless battle, what keeps you inspired and motivated?

DEL TORO: My children are really my only source of inspiration and stimulation. You know, when I was shooting MIMIC I was on the edge of giving it all up and my wife just said, “F**k it! Let them do this!” And I thought that I had to do it for my daughter at the time to show her what it is to be good and brave and fight for what I believe. And so I managed to finish this film and I moved on. In life you have to know how to fight in a smart way that doesn’t kill but allows you to move on. Because life is not just one battle, it’s several back to back to back, so you need to pace yourself, to be able to keep moving forward. My children are making me brave, concrete solid. As a human being, your children are the measure of how much you f**k up. They are the mirrors of your soul. With them you have a second chance at being good even if you were not good in the first place. So think about your children and seek inspiration through them. Family is the source of all the honors and of all the greatness.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Deadman
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2006, 01:09:48 AM »
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Dauberman draws 'Deadman' gig
Writer to work with Del Toro on comic adaptation
Source: Variety

Warner Bros. has hired tyro scribe Gary Dauberman to work with director-producer Guillermo del Toro in penning the script for the bigscreen adaptation of DC Comics' "Deadman."
Project is a potential directing vehicle for del Toro, who is producing with Angry Films' Don Murphy and Murphy's partner Susan Montford.

Deadman is the ghost of a murdered circus acrobat who has the power to possess the living in order to seek out his killer, as well as to help the innocent.

Dauberman impressed "Deadman" producers with a spec script he had written for a Western zombie pic.

Del Toro's latest film, "Pan's Labyrinth," opens Dec. 29.

Angry Films' upcoming slate includes "Transformers" and "Shoot 'Em Up."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Tarzan
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2006, 12:41:52 AM »
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'Tarzan' on vine for Warner Bros.
Weintraub bringing character back to bigscreen
Source: Variety
 
Warner Bros. and producer Jerry Weintraub are bringing Tarzan back to the bigscreen.

The studio is developing a new take on the Edgar Rice Burroughs-created character. Studio is negotiating with Guillermo del Toro to direct.

John Collee, who wrote "Master and Commander: Far Side of the World" and most recently scripted the WB animated hit "Happy Feet," is negotiating to write the screenplay.

Weintraub will produce through his Jerry Weintraub Prods. banner.

In the years since Burroughs first introduced the loincloth-clad character in book form in 1914, Tarzan has headlined live action and animated films, as well as radio and TV shows.

Del Toro, who grew up reading Spanish-language translations of those books, feels that the classic themes are still compelling, and that there is new ground to cover in the Tarzan mythology by turning back to the original Burroughs prose.

"I'd love to create a new version that is still a family movie, but as edgy as I can make it," Del Toro said. "There are strong themes of survival of a defenseless child left behind in the most hostile environment."

Deals are still being worked out, but Del Toro sparked to the chance to collaborate with Collee.

"John will be writing it alone, as I'll be in production on 'Hellboy 2' and pursuing writing projects of my own," Del Toro said. "He's got a great sense of adventure and the wilderness."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Tarzan
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2007, 10:37:32 PM »
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Tarzan Talk
Del Toro rumbles the jungle.

While in England doing press for the BAFTAs, filmmaker Guillermo del Toro dropped a few hints about the Tarzan movie he is aiming to bring to the big screen sometime down the line.

"The idea is to try to do a version unlike any other, in the sense that Tarzan's formative years growing through the jungle are incredibly tough and brutal," del Toro said to the press, according to Film Ick.

"There's always this idyllic sense of the jungle being like a Disney set and I want to portray how this guy becomes the toughest animal in the jungle."

Taran will be produced by Jerry Weintraub for Warner Bros. John Collee (Master & Commander: The Far Side of the World) is penning the screenplay adaptation of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel.

Del Toro previously told Variety, "I'd love to create a new version that is still a family movie, but as edgy as I can make it. ... There are strong themes of survival of a defenseless child left behind in the most hostile environment."

Del Toro is preoccupied for sometime with projects such as Hellboy II: The Golden Army and Deadman, so it could be several years before his Tarzan swings onto the silver screen.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Runoff
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2007, 11:08:21 AM »
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Del Toro's Next Project Revealed?
Source: Latino Review

Guillermo Del Toro is currently in talks with comic book creator Tom Manning to adapt his graphic novel Runoff onto the big screen.  The three volume series, published by Oddgod Press, is ready to release the final volume and also released a press release talking about the newest comic to film adaptation.  However Latino Review contacted Manning directly to talk about his comic coming to life.

“Guillermo Del Toro, Nick Nunziata and Lloyd Levin basically contacted me a year ago and we started talking about doing this project together,” says Manning.  “It's been moving along in baby steps ever since, but I think that's the way of Hollywood. We haven't worked out contractual details yet, so there are quite a few hoops to jump through before we're rolling any film. I'm not sure where this would fit into Guillermo's schedule, I know he's got his fingers in a lot of projects, but I hope Runoff cuts in line once it's a go.”

Manning continues, “When Guillermo, Nick and Lloyd first contacted me, Runoff chapter 3 hadn't come out. I sent them a plot summary of chapter three early on, but I still wasn't sure what they would think of the new book. The ending is a bit...shall we say...un-Hollywood, but that's the ending that was always intended. So when I sent them all preview copies of chapter three, I had my fingers crossed at how they would receive it. Thankfully they all just flipped out over it. Guillermo and Nick both were kind enough to offer to write quotes for the back page, and if I remember right they both told me it was their favorite chapter of the series. So that was a big relief. I guess whenever I am in contact with those guys I'm kind of blown away that they are radical enough to try and take Runoff to film.”

Latino Review also asked Manning how he felt about the series being finally over after several years of working on the comic in different forms, “(It) took seven years to finish, so it really feels strange to have it out of my head. I always say it's like having a movie on pause in your head that gets slowly played frame by frame, so I miss daydreaming and tweaking the world of Runoff since I did for so long. For this new chapter I worked more focused than I had ever done before. I took four months off from everything and basically worked sixteen hour days, six days a week. I literally didn't leave my place for weeks at a time and went fully nocturnal. It was kind of amazing to do - but when I finished inking that last page I didn't know if I should collapse, dance, laugh or cry... it was odd.   But it really does feel good to know it's actually finished. When I was selling the original 32 page issues at comic cons back around 2000 and 2001 I often wondered how I'd find the time and money to actually finish the story. If OddGod (Press) hadn't made that publishing deal with me in 2003, I don't know how I could have finished it.”
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2007, 12:40:48 PM »
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Guillermo talks!
Source: JoBlo.com
 
JoBlo/AITH man on the scene Jason Adams just got off the set of HELLBOY 2 in Budapest and while Universal is holding my first born as assurance we don't break our embargo, we are allowed to bring you some scoops about other Guillermo del Toro projects that don't feature a giant, red man-monster. So without further ado, here's a dispatch from across the sea. Sez Mr. Adams...

-AT THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS: Universal has finally acquired the rights, and he's self financed designs and maquettes. No greenlight yet though, mostly cause it will be "expensive, R-rated and doesn't have a happy ending." del Toro says it would be a return to big scale, tentpole horror pictures, like ALIENS, THE SHINING and THE EXORCIST.

-Guillermo is producing Neil Gaiman's DEATH: THE HIGH COST OF LIVING, which Gaiman is also directing. Selma Blair said she really wants to play Death, but Guillermo already has someone in mind.

-Guillermo is no longer doing a movie called BORN with Jennifer Connelly. Just said it fell through.

-The project he "would kill to make" is a faithful "Miltonian tragedy" version of FRANKENSTEIN that doesn't suck wild ass like Branagh's. He mentioned reading Frank Darabont's draft and saying it was pretty much perfect. (He was quoted a few weeks back saying something about using classic Universal horror monsters along with Hellboy, but today he seemed to insinuate if that happened it would be in one of the animated films.)

-Sadly, No WIND OF THE WILLOWS and no CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON for del Toro.

-He's using his clout from PAN'S mostly to produce stuff for first time directors, and not for his own projects. He's planning on overseeing a an English remake of THE ORPHANAGE, which he just produced. If he gets who he wants to make it, he promised it would be good, but wouldn't tell us who. -If he had the freedom to choose, MOUNTAINS would be next. But from experience, he'll take what he can get and not wait five years before his next movie. He mentioned some of the screenplays he wrote that never got made: MEPHISTO'S BRIDGE, COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO. Some of these might still be made, but as part of the "first time director/del Toro producing" projects. He's already setting one up at Miramax.

-Doug Jones said he hasn't heard anything about a Silver Surfer spinoff, but that he WOULD be willing to do it (and would prefer to use his own voice this time).
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Guillermo Del Toro
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2007, 09:35:32 PM »
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Del Toro, UA redo Brit TV 'Champions'
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Director Guillermo del Toro has signed on to bring the cult British science fiction TV series "The Champions" to the big screen for United Artists.

Del Toro will write and direct the adaptation, which is in the early stages of development. He also will produce the film along with Tom Cruise and Paula Wagner's C/W Prods. UA president of production Don Granger is overseeing for the studio.

The series, which ran for 30 episodes in 1968-69, revolved around the adventures of a trio of secret government agents whose lives were saved when their plane crashed in the Himalayas and they were rescued by an advanced civilization. The civilization also bestowed them with superhuman abilities. The series originally was produced by ITC, the company behind such British shows as "The Saint," "The Prisoner" and "Thunderbirds."

Granada International, which owns the ITC library, optioned the rights to the television series to UA. Granada's Robert Green is executive producing.

This is the fifth high-profile film that has been set up at UA since Cruise and Wagner have taken its helm.

Del Toro, who saw his "Pan's Labyrinth" nominated for several Academy Awards last year, is in production on "Hellboy 2: The Golden Army." A horror thriller produced by del Toro, "The Orphanage," is set for a Dec. 28 release from Picturehouse.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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