Author Topic: Who's Next To Croak?  (Read 208867 times)

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polkablues

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1455 on: November 21, 2013, 05:57:13 PM »
+3
In honor of Sylvia Browne's passing, I'd like to say a few words.

Fuck Sylvia Browne. The end.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

Pubrick

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1456 on: November 21, 2013, 07:37:59 PM »
+2
Quiet she'll hear you and reply vaguely through her successor.

endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

wilder

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1457 on: November 23, 2013, 02:25:40 PM »
0
R.I.P. Georges Lautner
22 November 2013
via Deadline

Veteran French director Georges Lautner has died. He was 87. Best known as the helmer of the classic 1963 film Les Tontons Flingueurs (Monsieur Gangster), Lautner passed away today in Paris after a long illness. Lautner was also a screenwriter and co-authored many of his films with Michel Audiard. Among them was black-and-white gangster comedy Les Tontons Flingueurs, an adaptation of the Albert Simonin book Grisbi Or Not Grisbi that includes one of the best kitchen table scenes ever committed to celluloid. That movie, which celebrates its 50th anniversary on November 27th — and which continues to draw big audiences in annual French television airings — starred Lino Ventura and Bernard Blier, among others. Lautner was more recently thanked in the credits to Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill: Vol. 2 and last directed 1992′s Stranger In The House which starred Jean-Paul Belmondo with whom he worked often, including in 1981′s The Professional and 1979′s Flic Ou Voyou (Cop Or Hood). Lautner also directed Robert Mitchum in 1990′s Presumed Dangerous. The son of actress Renée Saint-Cyr, he was born in Nice, France in 1926 and after moving to Paris made The Black Monocle which got him noticed by legendary Gaumont producer Alain Poiré who backed him to direct Les Tontons Flingueurs. French daily Le Figaro wrote this evening, “A symbol of the renewal of French post-war cinema, Georges Lautner knew, with Michel Audiard, how to impose a style of popular comedies that today remains inimitable.”

classical gas

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1458 on: November 30, 2013, 10:29:01 PM »
0

03

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1459 on: December 01, 2013, 12:52:31 AM »
0
and speed was a factor. is this real life

polkablues

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1460 on: December 01, 2013, 01:24:40 PM »
0
Way too young. By all accounts, he was a really nice guy. And with a young daughter, too. That's the saddest part.

I was just thinking about rewatching Running Scared the other day. Maybe I'll do that today.
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jenkins

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1461 on: December 01, 2013, 02:31:33 PM »
0
^ooh that's a good idea

joy ride sprung at me. thinking i'll double, then the throw the discs on the ground. this pour goes out to paul and [aww, some other dude also]

(edit) then i remembered another and now i'm just going to make a list stfu

***important list of my fondest paul walker movie memories***

the skulls
joy ride
running scared
into the blue
tammy and the t-rex
you guys slow down please, everyone is driving quickly and angrily [listed last 'cause there are too many, that'd be like another list]
Every perspective is an act of creation.

Lottery

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Reelist

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1463 on: December 02, 2013, 08:33:30 PM »
0
What the pig fuck
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

Punch

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1464 on: December 03, 2013, 01:33:54 PM »
+2


^Christopher Evan Welch^
"oh you haven’t truly watched a film if you didn’t watch it on the big screen" mumbles the bourgeois dipshit

03

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1465 on: December 04, 2013, 08:11:46 PM »
0
i thought vin diesel got in the wreck at the end

Ravi

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1466 on: December 15, 2013, 12:13:47 PM »
0
Peter O'Toole, star of Lawrence of Arabia, dies aged 81
Actor who shot to fame in David Lean's 1962 masterpiece and received eight Oscar nominations has died in hospital in London
Robert Booth
theguardian.com, Sunday 15 December 2013 12.58 EST

The actor Peter O'Toole, who found stardom in David Lean's masterpiece Lawrence of Arabia, has died aged 81, his agent has said.

The acclaimed leading man who overcame stomach cancer in the 1970s passed away on Saturday at the Wellington hospital in London following a long illness, Steve Kenis said.

O'Toole announced last year he was stopping acting saying: "I bid the profession a dry-eyed and profoundly grateful farewell."

He said his career on stage and screen fulfilled him emotionally and financially, bringing him together "with fine people, good companions with whom I've shared the inevitable lot of all actors: flops and hits."

Early in his career O'Toole became emblematic of a new breed of hard-drinking Hollywood hellraiser.

"We heralded the '60s," he once said. "Me, [Richard] Burton, Richard Harris; we did in public what everyone else did in private then, and does for show now. We drank in public, we knew about pot."

Last month it was reported he had been coaxed out of retirement to act in a film about ancient Rome called Katherine of Alexandria in which he would play Cornelius Gallus, a palace orator.

O'Toole is believed to have been born in Connemara in County Galway in Ireland, and lived in London. He shot to stardom in the 1962 film of TE Lawrence's life story and went on to star in Goodbye Mr Chips, The Ruling Class, The Stunt Man and My Favourite Year. He received an honorary Oscar in 2003 after receiving eight nominations and no wins - an unassailed record.

He is survived by his two daughters, Pat and Kate O'Toole, from his marriage to actress Siân Phillips, and his son, Lorcan O'Toole, by Karen Brown.

03

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1467 on: December 15, 2013, 04:04:57 PM »
0
as a sign of remembrance, i will be referring to everyone as a 'toole' today.

MacGuffin

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1468 on: December 15, 2013, 06:54:33 PM »
+2
As a sign of remembrance, I will refer to him as Peter Tool star of Lawrence of Labia.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

jenkins

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1469 on: February 03, 2014, 02:09:51 PM »
0
less tragic, bc he was 92 years old, miklós jancsó died on january 31. tbh my sadness about this is heightened since it took me three days and a lit website to find out. the site has an excellent tributary piece and i'll just quote it

Quote
Jancsó is perhaps best known for his work in the late 60s and early 70s, which saw him systematically exploring the question of how few takes he could use to make a film, while simultaneously exploring how complex those takes could be in terms of staging. The 87-minute-long Red Psalm consists of 27 elaborately designed shots[...]; in this way, the film was a forerunner of Aleksandr Sokurov’s 2002 single-take feature Russian Ark, as well as Alfonso Cuarón’s recent Gravity. (Cuarón named Jancsó as his primary influence in [an] Empire interview). Fellow Hungarian Béla Tarr was also much influenced by the man’s work, and has called him “the greatest Hungarian director of all time.”
http://htmlgiant.com/film/r-i-p-miklos-jancso/
Every perspective is an act of creation.

 

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