Author Topic: Who's Next To Croak?  (Read 242148 times)

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Stefen

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #690 on: September 06, 2007, 07:31:34 PM »
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Owen Wilson has nothing of value I could have won.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.

Ravi

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #691 on: September 10, 2007, 02:34:25 PM »
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/6987974.stm

Oscar-winner Wyman dies aged 93

Jane Wyman, one of Hollywood's biggest stars of the 1940s and '50s and the first wife of former US President Ronald Reagan, has died at 93.

She was nominated for four Oscars, winning once for her role as the deaf rape victim in 1948's Johnny Belinda.

Wyman, who also appeared in TV soap opera Falcon Crest, died on Monday at her home in Palm Springs in California.

She married Reagan, then a fellow actor, in 1940. They had two children and divorced eight years later.

Wyman had appeared alongside Reagan in two of her early hits - the 1938 comedy Brother Rat and its sequel Brother Rat and a Baby.

Her popularity rose after the war, and her first Oscar nomination came in 1947 for her role opposite Gregory Peck in The Yearling.

She won two years later for her moving performance as a woman who could not speak or hear in Johnny Belinda.

Her success continued in the 1950s, and she established herself as one of the finest dramatic actresses of her time with The Glass Menagerie, Alfred Hitchcock's Stage Fright and Here Comes the Groom with Bing Crosby.

Further Oscar nominations came her way for The Blue Veil and Magnificent Obsession.

Her film career ended in 1969 when she co-starred with Bob Hope and Jackie Gleason in How to Commit Marriage.

From 1981 to 1990, she was best known as Angela Channing, the Napa Valley winery owner who ruled the roost on Falcon Crest.

Married five times in all, Wyman rarely discussed her split from Reagan, but did say they split because "politics built a barrier between us".

"I tried to make his interests mine, but finally there was nothing to sustain our marriage," she said.

The couple had a daughter, Maureen, who died in 2001, and adopted a son, Michael, now a talk show host.

mogwai

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #692 on: September 23, 2007, 07:47:24 AM »
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French mime artist Marceau dies (source: bbc news)

The French mime artist Marcel Marceau has died at the age of 84, his family has announced.

The performer was known around the world for his portrayal of a white-faced clown with battered hat.

Born in Strasbourg in 1923, Marceau studied under mime master Etienne Decroux in Paris.

His daughter Camille said he died on Saturday evening, adding that details of the burial at Paris's Pere Lachaise cemetery would be given out later.

Silent films

Marceau, whose real name was Marcel Mangel, became world famous for his 1947 creation of Bip, the sad, white-faced clown in a striped jumper and a battered silk opera hat.

Mime artist Corinne Soum-Wasson, who was a friend of Marceau's, told the BBC he was an "extraordinary person".

"He trained with an extraordinary master, and due to his wonderful witty personality he was able to put that into practice. He was able to captivate people," she said.

"I was lucky enough to have known him very well, I was teaching at his school in Paris, and was just a generally funny, nice human being."

Ms Soum-Wasson said Marceau had created Bip early in his career: "He always told me the idea of Bip came to him very early on, when he was a student... he suddenly had the idea in class one day then developed it."

Marceau was credited with single-handedly reviving the art of mime after World War II, after two decades of being eclipsed by the silent movie.

Marceau was inspired to become a mime by the great US actors of the silent era such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harry Langdon.

His Compagnie Marcel Marceau was the only mime troupe in the world in the 1950s and 1960s - it enjoyed as much acclaim abroad as at home.

From 1969 to 1971 he directed the Ecole Internationale de Mime before founding his Ecole Internationale de Mimodrame in Paris in 1978.

He also made several films including Un Jardin Public, and Barbarella, with Jane Fonda.

In 2001 he was chosen to be a United Nations goodwill ambassador for the older generation.

pete

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #693 on: September 23, 2007, 01:38:25 PM »
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aw man this is sad.  I saw him about three years ago performing at a theater in Harvard.  He was great.
“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
- Buster Keaton

cine

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #694 on: September 23, 2007, 03:00:04 PM »
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to quote the man himself: "NOOO!"

mogwai

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #695 on: September 30, 2007, 05:16:00 AM »
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Bond star Lois Maxwell dies at 80

Actress Lois Maxwell, who starred as Miss Moneypenny in a string of James Bond movies, has died aged 80.

Maxwell starred alongside Sir Sean Connery in Bond's first movie outing, Dr No, in 1962.

She played the role until 1985, when she appeared with Roger Moore in A View To A Kill. Her last film role was in the 2001 thriller The Fourth Angel.

A spokesperson for Fremantle Hospital, Western Australia, said she died there on Saturday evening.

Gold Trumpet

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #696 on: September 30, 2007, 05:31:06 PM »
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When celebs die, they don't meet death, they meet mogwai.

ElPandaRoyal

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #697 on: September 30, 2007, 06:40:34 PM »
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When celebs die, they don't meet death, they meet mogwai.

 :lol:

Mogwai informs them of their death.
Si

Pubrick

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #698 on: September 30, 2007, 06:52:10 PM »
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When celebs die, they don't meet death, they meet mogwai.

 :lol:

Mogwai informs them of their death.

after he kills them.
under the paving stones.

MacGuffin

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #699 on: September 30, 2007, 09:15:43 PM »
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When celebs die, they don't meet death, they meet mogwai.

That kinda sounds like a tagline on a movie poster.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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mogwai

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #700 on: October 01, 2007, 02:29:44 AM »
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When celebs die, they don't meet death, they meet mogwai.

don't you mean nirvana?

MacGuffin

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #701 on: October 19, 2007, 12:10:40 AM »
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Comedian Joey Bishop dies at home in Los Angeles
 
LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Joey Bishop, the stone-faced comedian who found success in nightclubs, television and movies but became most famous as a member of Frank Sinatra's Rat Pack, has died at 89.
 
Joey Bishop was the last surviving member of the Rat Pack.

He was the group's last surviving member. Peter Lawford died in 1984, Sammy Davis Jr. in 1990, Dean Martin in 1995, and Sinatra in 1998.

Bishop died Wednesday night of multiple causes at his home in Newport Beach, publicist and longtime friend Warren Cowan said Thursday.

The Rat Pack -- originally a social group surrounding Humphrey Bogart -- became a show business sensation in the early 1960s, appearing at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas in shows that combined music and comedy in a seemingly chaotic manner.

Reviewers often claimed that Bishop played a minor role, but Sinatra knew otherwise. He termed the comedian "the Hub of the Big Wheel," with Bishop coming up with some of the best one-liners and beginning many jokes with his favorite phrase, "Son of a gun!"

The quintet lived it up whenever members were free of their own commitments. They appeared together in such films as "Ocean's Eleven" and "Sergeants 3" and proudly gave honorary membership to a certain fun-loving politician from Massachusetts, John F. Kennedy, at whose inauguration gala Bishop served as master of ceremonies.

The Rat Pack faded after Kennedy's assassination, but the late 1990s brought a renaissance, with the group depicted in an HBO movie and portrayed by imitators in Las Vegas and elsewhere. The movie "Ocean's Eleven" was even remade in 2003 with George Clooney and Brad Pitt in the lead roles.

Bishop defended his fellow performers' rowdy reputations in a 1998 interview.

"Are we remembered as being drunk and chasing broads?" he asked. "I never saw Frank, Dean, Sammy or Peter drunk during performances. That was only a gag. And do you believe these guys had to chase broads? They had to chase 'em away."

Away from the Rat Pack, Bishop starred in two TV series, both called "The Joey Bishop Show."

The first, an NBC sitcom, got off to a rocky start in 1961. Critical and audience response was generally negative, and the second season brought a change in format. The third season brought a change in network, with the show moving to ABC, but nothing seemed to help and it was canceled in 1965.

In the first series, Bishop played a TV talk show host.

Then, he really became a TV talk show host. His program was started by ABC in 1967 as a challenge to Johnny Carson's immensely popular "The Tonight Show."

Like Carson, Bishop sat behind a desk and bantered with a sidekick, TV newcomer Regis Philbin. But despite an impressive guest list and outrageous stunts, Bishop couldn't dent Carson's ratings, and "The Joey Bishop Show" was canceled after two seasons.

Philbin remembered Bishop fondly.

"It was the thrill of my life to be chosen by Joey as the announcer for his talk show on ABC back in the '60s," he said in a statement. "I learned a lot about the business of making people laugh. He was a master comedian and a great teacher and I will never forget those days or him."

After the talk show's cancellation, Bishop became a familiar guest figure in TV variety shows and as sub for vacationing talk show hosts, filling in for Carson 205 times.

He also played character roles in such movies as "The Naked and the Dead" ("I played both roles"), "Onion-head," "Johnny Cool," "Texas Across the River," "Who's Minding the Mint?" "Valley of the Dolls" and "The Delta Force."

His comedic schooling came from vaudeville, burlesque and nightclubs.

Skipping his last high school semester in Philadelphia, he formed a music and comedy act with two other boys, and they played clubs in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. They called themselves the Bishop Brothers, borrowing the name from their driver, Glenn Bishop.

Joseph Abraham Gottlieb would eventually adopt Joey Bishop as his stage name.

When his partners got drafted, Bishop went to work as a single, playing his first solo date in Cleveland at the well-named El Dumpo.

During these early years he developed his style: laid-back drollery, with surprise throwaway lines.

After 3 1/2 years in the Army, Bishop resumed his career in 1945. Within five years he was earning $1,000 a week at New York's Latin Quarter. Sinatra saw him there one night and hired him as opening act.

While most members of the Sinatra entourage treated the great man gingerly, Bishop had no inhibitions. He would tell audiences that the group's leader hadn't ignored him: "He spoke to me backstage; he told me, 'Get out of the way.' "

When Sinatra almost drowned filming a movie scene in Hawaii, Bishop wired him: "I thought you could walk on water."

Born in New York's borough of the Bronx, Bishop was the youngest of five children of two immigrants from Eastern Europe.

When he was 3 months old the family moved to South Philadelphia, where he attended public schools. He recalled being an indifferent student, once remarking, "In kindergarten, I flunked sand pile."

In 1941 Bishop married Sylvia Ruzga and, despite the rigors of a show business career, the marriage survived until her death in 1999.

Bishop, who spent his retirement years on the upscale Lido Isle in Southern California's Newport Bay, is survived by son Larry Bishop; grandchildren Scott and Kirk Bishop; and longtime companion Nora Garabotti.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Deborah Kerr dead at 86; actress had suffered from Parkinson's disease
     
LONDON, England (AP) -- Deborah Kerr, who shared one of Hollywood's most famous kisses and made her mark with such roles as the correct widow in "The King and I" and the unhappy officer's wife in "From Here to Eternity," has died. She was 86.
 
Deborah Kerr was nominated for six Oscars, including one for "From Here to Eternity."

Kerr, who suffered from Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk in eastern England, her agent, Anne Hutton, said Thursday.

For many she will be remembered best for her kiss with Burt Lancaster as waves crashed over them on a Hawaiian beach in the wartime drama "From Here to Eternity."

Kerr's roles as forceful, sometimes frustrated women pushed the limits of Hollywood's treatment of sex on the screen during the censor-bound 1950s.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences nominated Kerr a six times for best actress, but never gave her an Academy Award until it presented an honorary Oscar in 1994 for her distinguished career as an "artist of impeccable grace and beauty, a dedicated actress whose motion picture career has always stood for perfection, discipline and elegance."

She had the reputation of a "no problem" actress.

"I have never had a fight with any director, good or bad," she said toward the end of her career. "There is a way around everything if you are smart enough."

Kerr (pronounced CARR) was the only daughter of Arthur Kerr-Trimmer, a civil engineer and architect who died when she was 14.

Born in Helensburgh, Scotland, she moved with her parents to England when she was 5, and she started to study dance in the Bristol school of her aunt, Phyllis Smale.

Kerr won a scholarship to continue studying at the Sadler's Wells Ballet School in London. A 17 she made her stage debut as a member of the corps de ballet in "Prometheus."

She soon switched to drama, however, and began playing small parts in repertory theater in London until it was shut down by the 1939 outbreak of World War II.

After reading children's stories on British Broadcasting Corp. radio, she was given the part of a hatcheck girl with two lines in the film "Contraband," but her speaking role ended on the cutting-room floor.

After more repertory acting she had another crack at films, reprising her stage role of Jenny, a Salvation Army worker, in a 1940 adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Major Barbara," and receiving favorable reviews both in Britain and the United States.

She continued making films in Britain during the war, including one -- "Colonel Blimp" -- in which she played three different women over a span of decades.

"It is astonishing how she manages to make the three parts distinctly separate as characterizations," said New Movies magazine at the time.

Kerr was well-reviewed as an Irish spy in "The Adventuress" and as the tragic girlfriend of a Welsh miner in "Love on the Dole."

She was invited to Hollywood in 1946 to play in "The Hucksters" opposite Clark Gable. She went on to work with virtually all the other top American actors and with many top directors, including John Huston, Otto Preminger and Elia Kazan.

Tired of being typecast in serene, ladylike roles, she rebelled to win a release from her MGM contract and get the role of Karen Holmes in "From Here to Eternity."

Playing the Army officer's alcoholic, sex-starved wife in a fling with Lancaster as a sergeant opened up new possibilities for Kerr.

She played virtually every part imaginable from murderer to princess to a Roman Christian slave to a nun.

In "The King and I," with her singing voice dubbed by Marni Nixon, she was Anna Leonowens, who takes her son to Siam so that she can teach the children of the king, played by Yul Brynner.

Her best-actress nominations were for "Edward, My Son" (1949), "From Here to Eternity" (1953), "The King and I" (1956), "Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison" (1957), "Separate Tables" (1958), and "The Sundowners" (1960).

Among her other movies is "An Affair to Remember" with Cary Grant.

Other notable roles were in "Beloved Infidel," "The Innocents" (an adaptation of the Henry James novella "Turn of the Screw"), "The Night of the Iguana" with Richard Burton and "The Arrangement" with Kirk Douglas.

After "The Arrangement" in 1968, she took what she called a "leave of absence" from acting, saying she felt she was "either too young or too old" for any role she was offered.

Kerr told The Associated Press that she turned down a number of scripts, either for being too explicit or because of excessive violence.

She refused to play a nude scene in "The Gypsy Moths," released in 1968. "It was when they started that 'Now everybody has got to take their clothes off,' " she said. "My argument was that it was completely gratuitous. Had it been necessary for the dramatic content, I would have done it."

In fact she undressed for "The Arrangement," even though the scene was later cut. "There the nude scene was necessary, husband and wife in bed together," Kerr said. "That was real."

She returned to the stage, acting in Edward Albee's "Seascape" on Broadway and "Long Day's Journey Into Night" in Los Angeles.

Her Broadway debut was in 1953, when she was acclaimed as Laura Reynolds, a teacher's wife who treats a sensitive student compassionately in "Tea and Sympathy."

After a full season in New York, she took it on a national tour and recreated the role in a movie in 1956.

Kerr was active until the mid-1980s, with "The Assam Garden," "Hold the Dream" and "Reunion at Fairborough" all in 1985.

She told the AP that TV reruns of her old movies have "kept me alive" for a new generation of film fans.

In 1945 Kerr married Anthony Charles Bartley, whom she had met as a squadron leader in the Royal Air Force. They had two daughters and were divorced in 1959. A year later she married Peter Viertel, a novelist-screenwriter, with whom she lived on a large estate with two trout ponds in the Swiss Alpine resort of Klosters and in a villa in Marbella, Spain.

Kerr is survived by Viertel, two daughters and three grandchildren.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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cine

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #702 on: October 23, 2007, 06:07:26 AM »
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ok i'm calling it... robert goulet is next.  :yabbse-sad:

MacGuffin

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #703 on: October 30, 2007, 07:03:04 PM »
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ok i'm calling it... robert goulet is next.  :yabbse-sad:


WINNER!!!


Singer Robert Goulet dies at 73

Robert Goulet, the handsome, big-voiced baritone whose Broadway debut in "Camelot" launched an award-winning stage and recording career, has died. He was 73.

The singer died Tuesday morning in a Los Angeles hospital while awaiting a lung transplant, said Goulet spokesman Norm Johnson.

He had been awaiting a lung transplant at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles after being found last month to have a rare form of pulmonary fibrosis.

Goulet had remained in good spirits even as he waited for the transplant, said Vera Goulet, his wife of 25 years.

"Just watch my vocal cords," she said he told doctors before they inserted a breathing tube.

The Massachusetts-born Goulet, who spent much of his youth in Canada, gained stardom in 1960 with "Camelot," the Lerner and Loewe musical that starred Richard Burton as King Arthur and Julie Andrews as his Queen Guenevere.

Goulet played Sir Lancelot, the arrogant French knight who falls in love with Guenevere.

He became a hit with American TV viewers with appearances on "The Ed Sullivan Show" and other programs. Sullivan labeled him the "American baritone from Canada," where he had already been a popular star in the 1950s, hosting his own show called "General Electric's Showtime."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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pete

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #704 on: October 30, 2007, 10:09:16 PM »
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HOLY FUCKING SHIT.
“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
- Buster Keaton

 

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