Author Topic: Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick  (Read 9184 times)

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MacGuffin

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2003, 10:11:48 PM »
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Quote from: bonanzataz
A somewhat similar case is that of the Beatles, who refuse to allow their recordings in films but will lend out the song rights to other performers which may be placed in films.


Yeah, except that Michael Jackson owns the rights to their songs, and it's not that he doesn't allow them in movies and commercials, it's that they are very expensive and it is much cheaper to do cover versions.

I'll give you the example of Doug Liman wanting to use a portion of the "Jaws" score for a scene in "Swingers". Now, I don't know if it contractual or not, but they had to set up a screening of the film for Spielberg to approve the use of the recording. (It is there where he saw Vince Vaughn and cast him in "Lost World.")
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bonanzataz

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2003, 04:46:27 PM »
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we've had this discussion before. i saw on an i am sam documentary and have read in countless articles that they are extremely protective of the original recordings and won't let them be used anywhere except on radio and in their cd's. it was in an old rolling stone issue, i'm sure i could find it if i looked hard enough.
The corpses all hang headless and limp bodies with no surprises and the blood drains down like devil’s rain we’ll bathe tonight I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls Demon I am and face I peel to see your skin turned inside out, ’cause gotta have you on my wall gotta have you on my wall, ’cause I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls collect the heads of little girls and put ’em on my wall hack the heads off little girls and put ’em on my wall I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls

MacGuffin

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2003, 04:58:58 PM »
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Quote from: bonanzataz
we've had this discussion before. i saw on an i am sam documentary and have read in countless articles that they are extremely protective of the original recordings and won't let them be used anywhere except on radio and in their cd's. it was in an old rolling stone issue, i'm sure i could find it if i looked hard enough.


With I Am Sam, they said how to get the rights to the original recordings would have been more than their entire $8 million budget, so that's why they went with cover versions.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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godardian

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2003, 05:22:24 PM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
Read again. Kubrick asked for permission both legally and artistically:

Quote from: MacGuffin
Kubrick immediately looked into obtaining the rights to the song, and discovered that the fee was $10,000 to use it for 30 seconds. Once the rights were in hand, shooting proceeded immediately. Kubrick later invited Stanley Donen, the director of the musical classic, to view his scene and then asked Donen’s personal permission to use the song for the sequence. "He wanted to make sure I wasn’t offended," Donen reports in the biography Dancing on the Ceiling. "Why would I be? It didn’t affect the movie Singin’ in the Rain."


I think it's fantastic that Kubrick asked the director's blessing (not permission, I see there has been some angry confusion over the two concepts), and couldn't care less about the "star."

That's our Stanley!
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©brad

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #19 on: May 13, 2003, 03:28:52 PM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin

With I Am Sam, they said how to get the rights to the original recordings would have been more than their entire $8 million budget, so that's why they went with cover versions.


holy crap. rich people suck.

modage

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2003, 05:53:59 PM »
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yeah.  does anyone know the genesis of how Bowling For Columbine was able to use "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" (original recording).  i was pretty shocked to hear it, as i dont think ive ever heard the original recordings in a movie before. (except the beatles movies, of course).  i know that wes anderson wanted to use Hey Jude and some song off revolver although which is escaping me,  to bookend his movie and he tried and tried to get permission and ended up ( i believe because george harrision was dying at the time and couldnt be bothered with clearances) using the instrumental jude and the van morrison song at the end.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

MacGuffin

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2003, 06:35:10 PM »
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Quote from: themodernage02
i know that wes anderson wanted to use Hey Jude and some song off revolver although which is escaping me


"I'm Looking Through You" and it's on the Rubber Soul album.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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modage

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2003, 12:13:06 AM »
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thats right, i had read it a few years ago when the film came out but i couldnt remember for the life of me what it was now.  i knew it was of that era though.  i kind of think the van morrison song works perfectly though, maybe moreso than the beatles one would have.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

godardian

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Gene Kelly vs. Kubrick
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2003, 12:59:16 AM »
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Quote from: themodernage02
thats right, i had read it a few years ago when the film came out but i couldnt remember for the life of me what it was now.  i knew it was of that era though.  i kind of think the van morrison song works perfectly though, maybe moreso than the beatles one would have.


My absolute favorite, though, was finally hearing Nico acknowledged. I love her solo albums, and to hear her voice as Margot steps off the bus in slo-mo... that was such a beautiful moment for me. Nico, Nico, Nico... you were beautiful.

That also has a La Dolce Vita connection for ya there, modernage.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

pixelnixel

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« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2003, 02:41:06 AM »
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How much of that scene was Kubricks' or McDowells' and do you think Gene Kelly watched it more than once?
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