Author Topic: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...  (Read 3280 times)

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JG

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For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« on: November 04, 2005, 10:52:27 PM »
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or any digital editing system for that matter...

Me and my buddy recently shot a scene on a digital camera where we accidentally had the shutter effect on.  Is there any option you can choose on Final Cut Pro that would undo this effect and make it look a regular shot?

Sebastian Haff

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2005, 10:54:45 PM »
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If your source material is hosed, the whole scene is hosed. Looks like you'll have to reshoot.

JG

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2005, 11:07:44 PM »
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That's what I thought.  It was only about five seconds of material but it was a pretty tough shot and we kinda nailed it that one time.  Don't know if we'll be able recreate it.   If anyone has any tips, it would be appreciated. 

Reinhold

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2005, 03:16:08 PM »
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gotta reshoot, my friend.

the other possibility, of course, is to re-write your screenplay to call specifically for this effect in this scene.
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

polkablues

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2005, 05:41:24 PM »
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the other possibility, of course, is to re-write your screenplay to call specifically for this effect in this scene.

Like the "night-vision" scene in the remake of "Rollerball".  You know, confusing and pointless.

What I'm saying is, reshoot.  Or eat the loss.  Or come up with a really good rationalization for why the effect is there, and then talk about it in your director's commentary.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

JG

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2005, 05:56:31 PM »
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Well, I mean--what kind of movie actually uses the shutter effect. 

The shot opens, and it's fall. then it dissolves and it's suppose to give the illusion that it's winter.  To do this, we had to pull all the leaves of the tree off, alter the lighting, and change the white balance.  it looks great and the transition is seamless.   The problem is we can't get the leaves to grow back.  We can shoot the scene over but we would have to do it at another spot, seeing that the leaves from the tree have already been pulled down.  we pretty much got it perfect the first time.

if there is a way i can have it make sense, i will.  i put a bunch of regular look shots and then that one after it, and it seems way off.  i wonder if i put the shutter effect on all of them, would it seem as wierd and akward?  unless i can think of an idea of how to incorporate the shot into the movie so that it makes sense, it seems that this great show will go wasted.   

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2005, 06:04:09 PM »
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The shot opens, and it's fall. then it dissolves and it's suppose to give the illusion that it's winter.  To do this, we had to pull all the leaves of the tree off, alter the lighting, and change the white balance.  it looks great and the transition is seamless.   The problem is we can't get the leaves to grow back.

I think Final Cut Pro has some filters for tree killers. Go to Video Filters > Video > Environmental Destruction.

Apple has also developed a filter for bark removal, but it's not included.
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Reinhold

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2005, 10:12:55 PM »
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The shot opens, and it's fall. then it dissolves and it's suppose to give the illusion that it's winter.  To do this, we had to pull all the leaves of the tree off, alter the lighting, and change the white balance.  it looks great and the transition is seamless.   The problem is we can't get the leaves to grow back.

I think Final Cut Pro has some filters for tree killers. Go to Video Filters > Video > Environmental Destruction.

Apple has also developed a filter for bark removal, but it's not included.


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Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

polkablues

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2005, 12:18:04 AM »
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The tree knew what it was getting into when it went into the film industry.

Alternate joke: something about "If the tree didn't want to get plucked, it wouldn't have (...etc.)"
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

Recce

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2005, 10:15:39 PM »
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I'm assuming you shot with a low shutter, creating a weird, slow motion type effect? If so, assuming there are no people in your shot (since you said it was a tree without leaves or something), you might try speeding up your footage (assuming you have enough to spare). You'll still get a weird blurry type shot, but it might make it look a little better, if reshooting really isn't an option. If you do have enough footage to spare (meaning you shot longer then you needed to), you can try exporting your clip as an image sequence and going in and manually selecting the crispest frames and reimporting those as your new clip. You might get some of the blur out, but obviously the shot will be kinda jumpy. Sorry none of these are very good ideas, but it might be worth playing around with.
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metroshane

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2005, 05:06:03 PM »
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Why not take a single frame of leafy tree and extend it (run it at .05%  or similar speed), then one single frame of naked tree and do the same.  Then you can transition it together.
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Reinhold

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Re: For those familiar with Final Cut Pro...
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2005, 03:37:02 PM »
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aren't the individual frames fucked up because of the shutter effect?
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

 

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