Author Topic: Hitchcock  (Read 24805 times)

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modage

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Hitchcock
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2003, 11:34:52 PM »
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okay. Alfred Hitchcock. also one of my favorite directors.  but im looking for some recommendations for him as well.  ive seen...

TORN CURTAIN
THE BIRDS
PSYCHO
NORTH BY NORTHWEST
VERTIGO
THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH
THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY
TO CATCH A THEIF
REAR WINDOW
DIAL M FOR MURDER
ROPE
SPELLBOUND
REBECCA
THE 39 STEPS

and next up i am planning to see Notorious, Strangers On A Train, The Wrong Man.  what am i missing out on?
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

godardian

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Hitchcock
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2003, 12:51:01 AM »
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Quote from: themodernage02
okay. Alfred Hitchcock. also one of my favorite directors.  but im looking for some recommendations for him as well.  ive seen...

TORN CURTAIN
THE BIRDS
PSYCHO
NORTH BY NORTHWEST
VERTIGO
THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH
THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY
TO CATCH A THEIF
REAR WINDOW
DIAL M FOR MURDER
ROPE
SPELLBOUND
REBECCA
THE 39 STEPS

and next up i am planning to see Notorious, Strangers On A Train, The Wrong Man.  what am i missing out on?


Shadow of a Doubt is my all-time favorite Hitchcock.

I think Marnie has its charms, too, though it's much maligned.
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MacGuffin

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Hitchcock
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2003, 01:37:16 AM »
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Quote from: themodernage02
what am i missing out on?


"Suspicion"
"Saboteur"
"The Lady Vanishes"
"Foreign Correspondent" (pretty sure Spielberg took the umbrella get-away in "Minority Report" from this film)
"Lifeboat"
"The Lodger"
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godardian

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Hitchcock
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2003, 01:49:16 AM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
Quote from: themodernage02
what am i missing out on?


"Suspicion"
"Saboteur"
"The Lady Vanishes"
"Foreign Correspondent" (pretty sure Spielberg took the umbrella get-away in "Minority Report" from this film)
"Lifeboat"
"The Lodger"


Lifeboat is wonderful. Hitch was always a great humorist, in addition to his mastery of suspense. In her "Notes on Camp," Susan Sontag called Tallulah Bankhead's performance exemplary of "camping it up," and meant it as a high compliment.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Keener

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Hitchcock
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2003, 02:31:50 AM »
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Due to our crappy video store I've only had the chance to see Psycho and The Birds. Needless to say, I'm really pissed but I'm dedicated to renting his others. I'll just journey to the next town and see if thier video stores have his films.
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Void

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« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2003, 05:40:47 AM »
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My video store is also crappy, very much so infact, if you even dare to mention a film made before 2001, you'll be greeted only with icy blank stares. Yeah, so all I'v seen of his is Rear Window, North by northwest, Vertigo and Psycho but I am planning on trying to see others.
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Gold Trumpet

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« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2003, 10:56:09 AM »
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Though I feel Vertigo is really the movie he is making his own personal comment in some artistic way, I think Notorious is by far his best work. I saw it recently on Criterion disc and was astonished of how well thought it this entire film was in just capturing the mood that Hitchcock is famous for. It has all the cues of a Hitchcock movie, but this may be the movie where they all are handled the best.

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modage

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Hitchcock
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2003, 03:08:15 PM »
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Quote from: Void
My video store is also crappy, very much so infact, if you even dare to mention a film made before 2001, you'll be greeted only with icy blank stares. Yeah, so all I'v seen of his is Rear Window, North by northwest, Vertigo and Psycho but I am planning on trying to see others.


of the ones ive seen. i think those 4 are probably my favorites. i have them all and they are really some of the crowd-pleasers as far as his later stuff.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

eward

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« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2003, 08:07:01 PM »
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see The Lady Vanishes as well, it's one of his best.  though nothin beats Vertigo   :wink:
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modage

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« Reply #24 on: August 01, 2003, 11:00:22 PM »
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just watched NOTORIOUS, which i liked, but really expected more from.  my girlfriends brother who recently got the criterion box set said that was his favorite of the 5, and now i'm really having a hard time convincing myself to buy it for the films and not the criterion logos.  the only one i've yet to see is the lady vanishes, (and since i am a fan of the "middle-era hitch", i'm not sure that movie will convince me either.)
the movie did not seem very hitchcock.  for the first hour one of the only visual flairs was the shot of cary grant upsidedown from ingrid bergmans drunk pov.  and there really wasnt any suspense until the one hour mark either, when they were in the wine cellar.  i love cary grant, but felt this part was a little too straight man, not allowing for the usual wit and charm. although the relationship between the two was interesting, the spy aspects of the story werent enough to make me love this movie.  oh well.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

MacGuffin

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« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2003, 11:52:22 PM »
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Quote from: themodernage02
the movie did not seem very hitchcock.  for the first hour one of the only visual flairs was the shot of cary grant upsidedown from ingrid bergmans drunk pov.


Why are you thinking Hitchcock only in visual terms? Many themes that Hitchcock explores are there (unrequited love, the foreboding mother figure, etc.). And didn't you feel the intimacy by the close-ups when the lovers kiss? How about the long shot going across the room into a tight close-up of the key? The sucession of shots in the final scene?

Quote
and there really wasnt any suspense until the one hour mark either, when they were in the wine cellar.


Getting the key and their secret meetings weren't suspenseful? Her not getting found out by Sebastian? Her slowing being poisoned?

Quote
i love cary grant, but felt this part was a little too straight man, not allowing for the usual wit and charm.


The role doesn't allow for him to witty and charming. He's a spy and can't let himself to get too close to her. Yes, he's in love with her, but he has to keep it consealed for jeopordizing both them and the mission. Plus, she is being sent to sleep with another man to get the information he needs, which he's not too happy about. And when the effects of her poisioning are mistaken for her going back to drinking, he's none too pleased about that too.

Quote
although the relationship between the two was interesting, the spy aspects of the story werent enough to make me love this movie.


That's because it's not really a "spy" movie. It's a love story. And a love triangle story.
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modage

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« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2003, 09:48:39 AM »
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yeah, i did realize the themes were hitchcock, but like i said visually and in terms of humor (except for the opening where she was drunk driving), it just didnt seem like a very 'hitchcock' movie.  or maybe, it was just too downbeat. and, i still think it could have been more suspenseful.  (i said UNTIL the one hour mark, it wasnt.)  the poisoning and being found out were all after the first hour.  the love triangle, for me, just wasnt interesting enough to make up for the other parts of the story.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

SoNowThen

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« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2003, 09:16:21 AM »
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So I just watched The Lady Vanishes this weekend. I've been really tentative to get into Hitch, with the whole plot-first British/Hollywood thing going on. But I am very pleasantly surprised to find myself absolutely loving it. And I'll tell you, it's not the technical aspects for which everyone seems to praise him for, I really notice (now having seen half of the Criterion box set) his insistence on having a superb script. Tons of plot twists, but never a cheap way out. Always satisfying, and set-up previous.

Kind of reminds me (this is probably a bad example) of Ghostbusters, in that I never felt like that script cheaped out or let the audience down. Hollywood done right. If more so called big-budget studio pieces would just do another re-write and tighten up, I would see more of them. Someone once said to me that we have to be easier on older movies because what they use only "became" cliched over time. Well, in the Hitch movies so far I've seen no evidence of cliche, just fresh, wonderful storytelling.

So both the British flicks in the set get my big thumbs up. Can't wait to watch the pair of Ingrid Bergman's....

oh and Rebecca is just sheer brilliance!!!!
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Alexandro

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Hitchcock
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2003, 09:40:52 AM »
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I've seen a bunch of Hitchcock fims and all of them I liked, I don't think he ever made a really bad movie....just like Woody Allen, for example...

I remember seeing Psycho, of course
Vertigo
The Birds
North by Northwest
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Marnie
Shadow of a Doubt
Sabotage
The Rope
The Lady Vanishes
39 Steps
Rear Window

man, they're all so great...

TheVoiceOfNick

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Hitchcock
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2003, 04:27:31 PM »
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Quote from: Alexandro
I've seen a bunch of Hitchcock fims and all of them I liked, I don't think he ever made a really bad movie....just like Woody Allen, for example...


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