Author Topic: Greatest Films Ever  (Read 24924 times)

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cine

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Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #60 on: October 27, 2005, 09:49:30 PM »
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93 MOVIES OVER MAGNOLIA?!?!


 :yabbse-rolleyes:

Pubrick

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Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #61 on: October 28, 2005, 12:07:24 AM »
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me over lists.
under the paving stones.

MacGuffin

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #62 on: October 05, 2006, 12:24:16 PM »
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Porn film Deep Throat on most influential movie list

It joined the likes of Gone With The Wind and Citizen Kane in the Radio Times roll call.

The magazine described the hardcore porn title as "cheerfully trashy, charmingly silly".

Made in 1972, it went on to gross £320 million worldwide.

Its star, Linda Lovelace, later became a fervent anti-pornography campaigner and accused its makers of exploitation.

The Radio Times said: "Certainly the worst film to have major influence (it brought porn out of the back room and into the cinema), but by no means the worst porn film ever made.

"Cheerfully trashy, charmingly silly, this was a phenomenon of its day, a sign that the sexual revolution was in full swing."

The top 100 are included in the Radio Times Guide to Films 2007.

"While many of these movies are truly great, this is not a list of the greatest films of all time," Radio Times film editor Andrew Collins explained.

"These are films, major and minor, whose influence is still felt; time, context and circumstances have made them significant."

The Beatles film A Hard Day`s Night is included because it laid the foundations of the modern pop video.

Disney`s first full-length feature Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is there, alongside Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (the first buddy movie) and The Maltese Falcon (the blueprint for the film noir detective genre).

The Graduate was chosen because its star Dustin Hoffman "paved the way for other `funny-looking` future screen legends".

The Godfather: Part II made it into the list because "it is unique in being not just equal to, but better than, the original".

Steven Spielberg`s Jaws "redefined the marketing for all future event movies" while Psycho marked the birth of the "modern horror genre".

Only two films made since 2000 appear in the list: animated adventure Shrek and last year`s gay cowboy movie Brokeback Mountain.

Top 100 Landmark Films (in date order)

1 Le Voyage dans la Lune (1902)
2 Life of an American Fireman (1903)
3 The Birth of a Nation (1915)
4 Intolerance (1916)
5 The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1919)
6 Nanook of the North (1922)
7 Nosferatu, a Symphony of Horrors (1922)
8 Battleship Potemkin (1925)
9 The Gold Rush (1925)
10 Metropolis (1926)
11 The General (1927)
12 It (1927)
13 The Jazz Singer (1927)
14 Napoleon (1927)
15 Un Chien Andalou (1928)
16 Man with a Movie Camera (1929)
17 Frankenstein (1931)
18 M (1931)
19 Scarface (1932)
20 Ecstasy (1933)
21 42nd Street (1933)
22 King Kong (1933)
23 The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933)
24 L`Atalante (1934)
25 Becky Sharp (1935)
26 Triumph of the Will (1935)
27 The Story of a Cheat (1936)
28 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
29 Bringing Up Baby (1938)
30 Gone With The Wind (1939)
31 La Regle du Jeu (1939)
32 Stagecoach (1939)
33 Fantasia (1940)
34 Citizen Kane (1941)
35 The Maltese Falcon (1941)
36 Cat People (1942)
37 Rome, Open City (1945)
38 It`s A Wonderful Life (1946)
39 Song of the South (1946)
40 The Bicycle Thieves (1948)
41 Rashomon (1950)
42 M Hulot`s Holiday (1953)
43 The Robe (1953)
44 Les Diaboliques (1954)
45 On The Waterfront (1954)
46 Rebel Without A Cause (1955)
47 The Court Jester (1956)
48 Vertigo (1958)
49 A Bout de Souffle (1959)
50 The 400 Blows (1959)
51 Psycho (1960)
52 Victim (1961)
53 Dr No (1962)
54 A Fistful of Dollars (1964)
55 A Hard Day`s Night (1964)
56 Blowup (1966)
57 Persona (1966)
58 Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
59 The Chelsea Girls (1967)
60 In The Heat of the Night (1967)
61 The Graduate (1967)
62 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
63 Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)
64 Easy Rider (1969)
65 A Clockwork Orange (1971)
66 Get Carter (1971)
67 Sweet Sweetback`s Baadasssss Song (1971)
68 Deep Throat (1972)
69 Pink Flamingos (1972)
70 The Poseidon Adventure (1972)
71 The Exorcist (1973)
72 Mean Streets (1973)
73 The Godfather: Part II (1974)
74 The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
75 Jaws (1975)
76 Nashville (1975)
77 Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975)
78 Rocky (1976)
79 Annie Hall (1977)
80 Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977)
81 Halloween (1978)
82 National Lampoon`s Animal House (1978)
83 Superman (1978)
84 Alien (1979)
85 Blade Runner (1982)
86 ET the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
87 Tron (1982)
88 This Is Spinal Tap (1984)
89 Blue Velvet (1986)
90 Withnail & I (1986)
91 Do The Right Thing (1989)
92 Jurassic Park (1993)
93 Pulp Fiction (1994)
94 Toy Story (1995)
95 Ring (1998)
96 Festen (1998)
97 The Blair Witch Project (1999)
98 The Matrix (1999)
99 Shrek (2001)
100 Brokeback Mountain (2005)
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Chest Rockwell

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #63 on: October 05, 2006, 12:38:48 PM »
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I actually for the most part really like the list. Some interesting picks.

I like that Brokeback Mountain is on it and that Crash isn't. Meanwhile I figured Lumiere Bros. had to be on it. Their justification for The Graduate is stupid; if that's the reason then shouldn't Little Caesar be on it instead of The Graduate? Peter Lorre would also work; I see M on it, at least.

MacGuffin

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #64 on: January 19, 2007, 05:17:07 PM »
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AFI revisits '100 Years ... 100 Movies'

Gearing up for the next installment of its annual TV special under the banner of "AFI's 100 Years...," the American Film Institute has decided to play it again, Sam.

For the 10th edition of its yearly look at the best in American movies, the AFI will return to the theme of the first show broadcast in 1998, "AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies," and offer a new assessment of the 100 greatest movies of all time.

More than 1,500 jurors, drawn from directors, screenwriters, actors, editors, cinematographers, critics and historians, will be asked to make their choices from a list of 400 American, narrative feature films, including long-standing classics as well as newly eligible films released from 1996-2006. Of the 400 films on the ballot, 44, or about 11%, come from the last decade.

The results will be presented in a three-hour program, directed by Gary Smith, exec produced by Smith and Frederick S. Pierce and produced by Dann Netter and Bob Gazzale, which will air on CBS in June.

The AFI currently envisions creating a new list of the 100 greatest movies of all time every ten years so that it can assemble a decade-by-decade portrait of changing appreciations of American film.

"We needed to think about the 21st century in a way that would enable us to document film history as appropriately as possible," AFI president and CEO Jean Picker Firstenberg explained. "We had to play so much catch up for the first 100 years (of film history), it became clearer and clearer that we needed to think about great movies every ten years, so that we'll have a decade by decade sense of it and be really responsive to the 21st century. We're very excited to see where the jury comes down on this. We think we're going to see shifts and changes."

"We'll be building a volume every ten years, adding to the first list," Gazzale observed.

While Firstenberg has announced she will be retiring this year, the search for her successor is currently under way, and Firstenberg said she expects to remain at her post until the fall, which will allow her to oversee the unveiling of the new list.

When AFI conducted its original poll in 1998, the top ranking films were "Citizen Kane," "Casablanca," "The Godfather," "Gone with the Wind" and "Lawrence of Arabia."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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modage

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #65 on: January 19, 2007, 05:22:48 PM »
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i'm very very interested to see how this list changes. 
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

RegularKarate

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #66 on: January 19, 2007, 05:34:14 PM »
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i'm very very interested to see how this list changes. 

Exact same list except no Mel Gibson films.

MacGuffin

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #67 on: May 31, 2007, 12:20:04 AM »
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Freeman to host AFI countdown
CBS special will include newly eligible films
 
Morgan Freeman has been tapped to host the 10th installment of AFI's annual movie countdown series.

This year's special, airing June 20 on CBS, will revisit AFI's "100 Years ... 100 Movies" theme, ranking the 100 greatest movies in cinema history. Updated special will include newly eligible films such as "American Beauty," "Titanic" and "The Lord of the Rings."

Special will include appearances by Halle Berry, Peter Bogdanovich, Laurence Fishburne, Peter Fonda, Harrison Ford, William Friedkin, Dennis Hopper, Norman Jewison, Spike Lee, Shirley MacLaine, Malcolm McDowell, Liza Minnelli, Sydney Pollack, Debbie Reynolds, Martin Scorsese, Martin Sheen and M. Night Shyamalan.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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grand theft sparrow

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #68 on: June 20, 2007, 07:12:10 PM »
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Oh, my God!  I just realized that Crash is going to be on this fucking list.

modage

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #69 on: June 20, 2007, 10:24:26 PM »
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Oh, my God!  I just realized that Crash is going to be on this fucking list.
thankfully not.

Facts about AFI's top-100 movies, then and now

Source: The Associated Press

Here are some facts and trivia about the American Film Institute's new list of top-100 U.S. movies, with some comparisons to the institute's first such list in 1998:

— Out of the 43 newly eligible films released from 1996 to 2006, only four made the new top-100 list: "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," "Saving Private Ryan," "Titanic" and "The Sixth Sense."

— Nineteen other movies that failed to make the cut in 1998 landed on the list this time: "The General," "Intolerance," "Nashville," "Sullivan's Travels," "Cabaret," "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," "The Shawshank Redemption," "In the Heat of the Night," "All the President's Men," "Spartacus," "Sunrise," "A Night at the Opera," "12 Angry Men," "Swing Time," "Sophie's Choice," "The Last Picture Show," "Do the Right Thing," "Blade Runner" and "Toy Story."

— Twenty-three films on the 1998 list dropped out of the top-100 this time: "Dr. Zhivago," "The Birth of a Nation," "From Here to Eternity," "Amadeus," "All Quiet on the Western Front," "The Third Man," "Fantasia," "Rebel Without a Cause," "Stagecoach," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," "The Manchurian Candidate," "An American in Paris," "Wuthering Heights," "Dances With Wolves," "Giant," "Fargo," "Mutiny on the Bounty," "Frankenstein," "Patton," "The Jazz Singer," "My Fair Lady," "A Place in the Sun" and "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner."

— The earliest film represented is 1916's "Intolerance" and the newest is 2001's "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring."

— The 1970s is the most-represented decade, with 20 films.

— Only three films hold the same rank they held on the 1998 list: "Citizen Kane" at No. 1, "The Godfather Part II at No. 32 and "The Best Years of Our Lives" at No. 37.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

Pubrick

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #70 on: June 21, 2007, 12:27:19 AM »
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this list is bullshit but nevertheless..

happy
-birth of a nation replaced by intolerance
-all of the new inclusions except spartacus (just realised that means even MORE kubrick on the list :yabbse-smiley: )
-no crash

not happy
-FARGO IS OUT
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MacGuffin

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #71 on: June 21, 2007, 01:09:39 AM »
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AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies

1. Citizen Kane, 1941
2.The Godfather, 1972
3. Casablanca, 1942
4. Raging Bull, 1980
5. Singin' in the Rain, 1952
6. Gone With the Wind, 1939
7. Lawrence of Arabia, 1962
8. Schindler's List, 1993
9. Vertigo, 1958
10. The Wizard of Oz, 1939
11. City Lights, 1931
12. The Searchers, 1956
13. Star Wars, 1977
14. Psycho, 1960
15. 2001: A Space Odyssey, 1968
16. Sunset Blvd., 1950
17. The Graduate, 1967
18. The General, 1927
19. On the Waterfront, 1954
20. It's a Wonderful Life, 1946
21. Chinatown, 1974
22. Some Like It Hot, 1959
23. The Grapes of Wrath, 1940
24. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, 1982
25. To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962
26. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939
27. High Noon, 1952
28. All About Eve, 1950
29. Double Indemnity, 1944
30. Apocalypse Now, 1979
31. The Maltese Falcon, 1941
32. The Godfather Part II, 1974
33. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, 1975
34. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937
35. Annie Hall, 1977
36. The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957
37. The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946
38. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948
39. Dr. Strangelove, 1964
40. The Sound of Music, 1965
41. King Kong, 1933
42. Bonnie and Clyde, 1967
43. Midnight Cowboy, 1969
44. The Philadelphia Story, 1940
45. Shane, 1953
46. It Happened One Night, 1934
47. A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
48. Rear Window, 1954
49. Intolerance, 1916
50. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001
51. West Side Story, 1961
52. Taxi Driver, 1976
53. The Deer Hunter, 1978
54. MASH, 1970
55. North By Northwest, 1959
56. Jaws, 1975
57. Rocky, 1976
58. The Gold Rush, 1925
59. Nashville, 1975
60. Duck Soup, 1933
61. Sullivan's Travels, 1941
62. American Graffiti, 1973
63. Cabaret, 1972
64. Network, 1976
65. The African Queen, 1951
66. Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981
67. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? 1966
68. Unforgiven, 1992
69. Tootsie, 1982
70. A Clockwork Orange, 1971
71. Saving Private Ryan, 1998
72. The Shawshank Redemption, 1994
73. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969
74. The Silence of the Lambs, 1991
75. In The Heat of the Night, 1967
76. Forrest Gump, 1994
77. All the President's Men, 1976
78. Modern Times, 1936
79. The Wild Bunch, 1969
80. The Apartment, 1960
81. Spartacus, 1960
82. Sunrise, 1927
83. Titanic, 7997
84. Easy Rider, 1969
85. A Night at the Opera, 1935
86. Platoon, 1986
87. 12 Angry Men, 1957
88. Bringing Up Baby, 1938
89. The Sixth Sense, 1999
90. Swing Time, 1936
91. Sophie's Choice, 1982
92. Goodfellas, 1990
93. The French Connection, 1971
94. Pulp Fiction, 1994
95. The Last Picture Show, 1971
96. Do The Right Thing, 1989
97. Blade Runner, 1982
98. Yankee Doodle Dandy, 1942
99. Toy Story, 1995
100. Ben-Hur, 1959
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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grand theft sparrow

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #72 on: June 21, 2007, 08:32:12 AM »
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Oh, my God!  I just realized that Crash is going to be on this fucking list.
thankfully not.

When Do the Right Thing popped up on the list, I panicked, thinking that if that made it in at the bottom, the other one would be sure to follow since, you know... it really opened people's eyes.

As far as lists go, this one is still the least offensive, even less so now than in 1997.  And that's even taking into account that Fantasia, Fargo, and Third Man's omissions are unforgivable.

The top ten is no longer embarrassingly devoid of Hitchcock and Kubrick... just Kubrick.  Raging Bull is a nice addition to the top ten but we all know 2001 should be there instead.

I didn't realize I was happy with Blade Runner until the commercial for the box set got me more excited than any summer blockbuster trailer of the last 2 years.

Titanic in for Dances With Wolves is a slight upgrade.

Sixth Sense in for Close Encounters is a major downgrade.

Casablanca and The Godfather were in the right order the first time around.

And there's too much Tom Hanks on this list.  Private Ryan or Gump, not both.  Toy Story can stay.

The Red Vine

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #73 on: June 21, 2007, 10:41:39 AM »
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Sixth Sense higher than Last Picture Show? Easy Rider higher than Goodfellas? Ridiculous.
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Gold Trumpet

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Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #74 on: June 21, 2007, 02:52:45 PM »
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The list isn't serious. I'm surprised Raging Bull is as high as it is. I wouldn't put it that high, but it is better than most of the films in the top ten.

I'm not going to make any great case for my every disagreeance. I'd have to to do the impossible by arguing one film is better than another when they have no similarities for comparison. But the evidence this list is stupid is with Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid still being higher than The Wild Bunch. They are closer together this year (Butch Cassidy was #50 and Wild Bunch in the #80's last time) but still.

When both were released, they were compared because of story but Butch Cassidy was considered the Hollywood affair. Many critics felt empowered to give the film negative reviews because they knew The Wild Bunch was better and needing critical support. It didn't help. Butch Cassidy got the Oscars and fame. But this was also the case for Raging Bull and other films. Critical acclaim was suppose to recognize their superiority years later. The case of The Wild Bunch is just an elder and forgotten one. Little care or interest is out to recognize the obvious superiority of one over the other. 

 

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