Author Topic: Greatest Films Ever  (Read 24921 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

InTylerWeTrust

  • The Meeting with the Goddess
  • ***
  • Posts: 354
  • Respect: +27
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #150 on: August 09, 2012, 10:56:01 PM »
0
I'm beginning to think Pubrick has a crush on me....
Fuck this place..... I got a script to write.

Jeremy Blackman

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11253
  • Respect: +1498
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #151 on: August 09, 2012, 10:59:18 PM »
0
Wouldn't surprise me. He expresses affection in mysterious ways.
"Hunger is the purest sin"

polkablues

  • Child of Myth
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 7235
  • Respect: +2001
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #152 on: August 09, 2012, 11:09:48 PM »
0
You know it's store policy for the checkout girls to smile at you, right?  They're not actually hitting on you.
First things first, I'm surrealist

InTylerWeTrust

  • The Meeting with the Goddess
  • ***
  • Posts: 354
  • Respect: +27
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #153 on: August 09, 2012, 11:17:47 PM »
0
You know it's store policy for the checkout girls to smile at you, right?  They're not actually hitting on you.

PFFT, Child Please.... THEY ALL WANT ME.





BTW you just called Pubrick, a: "checkout girl". LOL
Fuck this place..... I got a script to write.

Reelist

  • Shoutbox Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2609
  • Respect: +1042
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #154 on: August 09, 2012, 11:48:10 PM »
0
I was just about to back you up, but then I realized that Candyman is from 1992.  1995 was Candyman 2: Farewell to the Flesh.   :yabbse-undecided:

See, I had that coming to me. Trying to play a joke on Tyler like that.

Reservoir dogs for 1992 of course.

and Glengarry Glen Ross
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

ElPandaRoyal

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1724
  • Respect: +121
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #155 on: August 10, 2012, 04:00:10 AM »
0
OK, so...

1982: The Thing! (Blade Runner, E.T., Tenebrae)

1992: Husbands & Wives (also Reservoir Dogs, The Player and Batman Returns)

1995: Heat (Casino)
Si

Robyn

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1011
  • Respect: +400
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #156 on: August 10, 2012, 06:01:14 AM »
+1
I really only liked two films from the year I was born. Reservoir Dogs and Glengarry Glen Ross.

RegularKarate

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 6056
  • Respect: +217
    • http://www.livejournal.com/users/regularkarate/
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #157 on: August 10, 2012, 11:02:43 AM »
0
In alphabetical order...1977:

3 Women
Annie Hall
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Eraserhead
Kentucky Fried Movie
Saturday Night Fever
Smokey and the Bandit
Star Wars
Suspiria

Reelist

  • Shoutbox Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2609
  • Respect: +1042
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #158 on: August 10, 2012, 11:20:03 AM »
0
I really only liked two films from the year I was born. Reservoir Dogs and Glengarry Glen Ross.

we're so alike
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

I am Schmi

  • The Call to Adventure
  • *
  • Posts: 40
  • Respect: +7
Re: Greatest Films Ever
« Reply #159 on: August 10, 2012, 03:44:39 PM »
0
Vertigo > Citizen Kane? Sight & Sound Declares the Greatest Film of All Time
By Movieline

Here comes the cinephile debate of the day: After polling 846 film experts, BFI’s Sight & Sound declared Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo to be the #1 greatest film of all time, topping Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane, Yasujirō Ozu’s Tokyo Story, and classics from Renoir, Murnau, Kubrick, and more of your favorite all-timers. It’s a triumph long in coming for the Hitchcock pic, which only first made Sight & Sound’s once-a-decade list in 1982 and has been working its way up the ranks of critical opinion since. Does the 2012 poll finally have it right?

Culled from Top Ten lists from 846 critics, academics, writers, and programmers, Sight & Sound’s GOAT survey is at its widest to date. The full ten:

The Critics’ Top 10 Greatest Films of All Time
1. Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
2. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
3. Tokyo Story (Ozu, 1953)
4. La Rčgle du jeu (Renoir, 1939)
5. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans (Murnau, 1927)
6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
7. The Searchers (Ford, 1956)
8. Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
9. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dreyer, 1927)
10. 8 ˝ (Fellini, 1963)

Somewhere out there, Kim Novak is raising her fist in victory while William Friedkin – who told Movieline Citizen Kane set the bar for cinematic greatness so high, trying to match it is what keeps him going – is probably shaking his damn head.

Meanwhile, 358 filmmakers were polled for a separate director’s choice, yielding some interesting differences in opinion:

The Directors’ Top 10 Greatest Films of All Time
1. Tokyo Story (Ozu, 1953)
2. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968) and Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941) (tie)
4. 8 ˝ (Fellini, 1963)
5. Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1980)
6. Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979)
7. The Godfather (Coppola, 1972) and Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958) (tie)
9. Mirror (Tarkovsky, 1974)
10. Bicycle Thieves (De Sica, 1948)

It’s interesting to note the divide between critics’ and filmmakers’ ranking of Vertigo, which is a more populist-romantic choice in ways than Citizen Kane; perhaps unsurprisingly, the directors’ list is much more auteur-heavy in its leanings. But let’s open this up to discussion: Is Vertigo really the best film of all time? (Is it even the best Hitchcock of all time?)



http://blogs.indiewire.com/peterbogdanovich/the-sight-and-sound-poll

Figured you folks might have an opinion on PD's article.


Personally, I agree and disagree. While he's obviously correct in stating that there are more than 10 fantastic films, I don't believe reducing it down to the 10 "best" (debatable) is a disservice to the art. I too have trouble assembling a top 10, I find my list changing ever so often when reminded of another picture.

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy