Author Topic: the slow shutter effect  (Read 1192 times)

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md

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the slow shutter effect
« on: August 12, 2004, 01:09:03 AM »
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when you see b roll footage, or additional bonus or extra footage, you notice at the end of the clip, it oversaturates due to the slowing of the frame rate I believe.  whats that called, and more importantly where can I find the a plugin that recreates that...i know its there..thanks
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mutinyco

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the slow shutter effect
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2004, 10:40:52 AM »
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What you're seeing are the breaks in the film recording. Cameras start on the last frame they stopped, and that frame is usually overexposed to a white-out. It also can effect surrounding frames. Also, if you're using a daylight spool, the fronts and ends of your roll will experience this significantly.

You COULD recreate the look on video, I guess. You'd need to do some compositing. But it'd help if you have actual film experience and know how the light affects the individual frames.
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Redlum

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the slow shutter effect
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2004, 08:05:15 PM »
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I just found the exact clip you're after in an After Effects tutorial CD, let me know if you still need it. Probably too late now.
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