Author Topic: Sound Troubles  (Read 5554 times)

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ono

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Sound Troubles
« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2004, 09:28:12 PM »
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Cool, thanks.

Quote from: mutinyco
There are plenty of other ways to make contacts and get your work seen.

Like?

mutinyco

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« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2004, 09:35:17 PM »
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The best advice I can give is to seriously look at your own work. What are you good at? How far do you really think you can go? Start there. Then think about which established professionals you really like and might like you. Then devote yourself full-on for 2 years trying to meet people and get your work seen. It helps to be in a large metropolitan area where you can get better access. Anything more than this advice is going to come down to you. And how quickly you can think on your feet. And how badly you want it.
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

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billybrown

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Sound Troubles
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2004, 12:54:07 PM »
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Quote from: mutinyco
I kind of feel like they're a scam. I have yet to show any of my work in a festival, and I can't say I miss it. There are plenty of other ways to make contacts and get your work seen. I have the same general opinion about film schools.

Although, I should admit, I would have no problem entering a finished feature film into a festival -- as a way to premiere it. But I'm not terribly interested in the scene, generally speaking.


So if not festivals, what other methods have you used to get your work seen by industry types, etc.? I myself am sitting on a recently completed short film, and set to shoot another at month's end... what do you suggest as a means of getting it/them out there?

mutinyco

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« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2004, 03:06:55 PM »
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If you have enough money to keep making short films, you should have enough to start a website. You can get 800 megs for like $100 a year. That's one suggestion. Point is: you need to create a platform for yourself. You need to develop a strategy too. I can't give you specifics, cause nobody ever gave me any. You just have to do it. And go at it like there's no tomorrow. I mean, what separates you from the other 10,000,000 wannabe's? Are you that good? Can you really stand toe to toe with your competition? Sometimes, (usually) the front door isn't the best entrance. You're going to have to figure it out. And you're going to have to sacrifice A LOT. A lot of shit and a lot of friends might get left in the dust. Trying to make it is not a pretty process. Somebody isn't going to see you and sweep you up. Doesn't work that way. Be intuitive and aggressive -- and above all ORIGINAL -- and it will come to you.
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

-St. Joe

mutinyco

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« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2004, 04:19:57 PM »
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Mark Romanek offers as good an advice as anybody on his site: "start making films. the only way to really learn is to do it. if the films you make are daring, sincere, and well crafted. then they will find an audience. and, if they find an audience, someone in the business will come to you. everyone gets his or her start differently. people need to discover and follow their own unique path."
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

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Outpatient_Cowboy

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« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2004, 06:37:53 PM »
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A question to Mutinyco:
Why exactly do you feel that film school is a scam?
Do you believe that no one can be taught film and only some people magically have the gift or a talent that cannot be improved, you may say that the only way to learn is to do (I am of the same school of thought) but are you taking into consideration film schools that teach by javing you make films?
"...like nailing Jello to a tree"

mutinyco

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« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2004, 08:25:18 PM »
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That's a soft "j" on "javing"?

Um, I think film schools can give you a great sense of film history. I think film school can teach you the mechanics of filmmaking. And I think they can give you great contacts, both within the industry and in terms of peers.

Will they make you a good filmmaker, per se? That's still going to depend on you. Film school won't give you drive or talent.

I think certain schools have decent track records: NYU, for example. Even USC or UCLA. Or AFI. If you can get into any of those graduate schools you'd have to stupid not to get industry work -- not necessarily as a director, but you'll be around the elite and the industry will be watching. They all have pretty good placement abilities, too.

But to be a great filmmaker is to also be a great artist. And that CANNOT be taught. I think film schools create a certain type of ego. A very cliquey type of ego. I also think it creates a certain in-breeding, where people's ideas of what can be done with film are too steeped in what has already been done: movies about other movies, or Tarantino on Tarantino.

Another negative of film schools is that they tend to force you into specialties. AFI, for example, is extremely strict about this. If you're a director, you're a director. An editor, an editor. That works well for the industry -- and again, the word is: INDUSTRY. And that's really what film schools have become, whores to the industry. Another time and place and that might've been fine. But not today.

Today, unless you've been in a cave, we've experienced a democratization of digital. For a recent proposal, on my own, I was able to write the script, do storyboards, concept sketches, a teaser trailer (shot and cut), location photos, and also a CD demo of the theme. Film school would not have encouraged such work.

Ultimately, it comes down to the individual. For me, I didn't need it. Life was more important, growing as a person and having something to make movies about. If you compared a list of those who didn't: Everybody from the first 60 years of filmmaking, then Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson, Sofia Coppola, Robert Altman, Federico Fellini, David Fincher -- to those who did: Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Joel Coen, Spike Lee, George Lucas, Darren Aronofsky...it's comparable.

It depends on the individual. If you have IT, it won't matter.
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

-St. Joe

Outpatient_Cowboy

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Sound Troubles
« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2004, 09:12:24 PM »
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I think you have a lot of great points, and I, for the most part, whole heartedly agree. I'd be very interested in seeing your work. As Nietzche would say you are certainly a "lion". Keep up the struggle for real art.
"...like nailing Jello to a tree"

mutinyco

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« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2004, 09:22:13 PM »
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Thanks.
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

-St. Joe

Outpatient_Cowboy

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« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2004, 09:28:12 PM »
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also...you possess a tremendous amount of faith- there is a huge level of belief that there is justice out there. I see movies like Glitter and Snow Dogs and cry afterwards thinking of the millions of dollars that went to utter waste and how even though I design films that dont rely upon wasted money like that, I could create revolutionary work if given the chance. In your system of belief it would make sense that if I truly could create such astounding work than others would see that potential and open the gates. what's your answer to films like Gigli et al. ?
"...like nailing Jello to a tree"

mutinyco

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« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2004, 11:05:10 PM »
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Hehe...I didn't think Gigli was THAT bad. I think it was kind of misunderstood. Don't really feel like getting into it right now.

Here's the link to a website I used to run http://movienavigator.org

The site is kind of a ghost at this point. I ran it with a friend. I did the interviews, essays and all of the photography and artwork. He did the reviews.
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

-St. Joe

metroshane

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« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2004, 12:22:08 AM »
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I agree with most of that...however school is more than just the education.  Significant social skills are developed in that environment...and let's face it, motivation and structure are helpful to most of us.  

While there is no substitute for hands on experience, film school can be a great thing.
We live in an age that reads too much to be intelligent and thinks too much to be beautiful.

Link

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Sound Troubles
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2004, 09:36:33 AM »
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Quote from: mutinyco
You said you're on Mac. Are you using a tower or PowerBook? If you're using a laptop, what editing software have you got? If you've got Final Cut Pro 4, then record all of your sound directly onto the computer as if it were a DAT. You could do it with the tower, too, if all of the shooting was at one location. The sound'll be fine, plus you'll have saved yourself a step by already having it on your computer in a compatible file.


I had a little AT-AR55 (not an xlr mic) and connected it straight to my PowerBook, and the sound would not record any higher than a certain level (a little over half of the volume that it's capable of).  My dad said it had to do with ohms, etc, which I don't quite understand.  So if I have a mic (xlr with a wider range, etc) hooked up to a mixer/preamp, then hook that up straight to the laptop, do you think I would be able to get a better result?  Because with teh AR55, I could put my mouth to the mic and yell, and it would peak out at just over halfway up the volume meter.  I'm just asking because i haven't received my new mic yet, though I plan on trying it out soon.  I also have a minidisc recorder if it's better that way.  I dont' know.

mutinyco

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Sound Troubles
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2004, 12:05:07 PM »
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If you're using a decent sound program you shouldn't have any problems. I did a short about 1 1/2 years ago (yikes!) and we used my roommate's G4 tower with his Pro Tools to record the dialogue and sound. No problems. It should work fine. Just make sure your equipment is all set correctly.
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matt35mm

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« Reply #29 on: April 12, 2004, 04:45:59 PM »
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Well the only thing is that I'm not recording straight into the computer.  I'm recording onto the DV camera, and then transfering to the computer.   I don't have a laptop.

 

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