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Movies that mattered but Oscar ignored

©brad · 11 · 3025

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©brad

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on: February 20, 2003, 10:21:10 AM
Movies.com has a surprisingly good list of 10 movies that were ignored by the oscars for best picture. Here it is-


2001: A Space Odyssey
You know you've made it into the cultural canon when your film is parodied on a TV cartoon series (Futurama). Stanley Kubrick's massively influential sci-fi epic, cited by Steven Soderbergh as an inspiration for Solaris, has received mountains of praise from critics — it's No. 22 on the American Film Institute's list of the Greatest American Movies of All Time and was added to the National Film Registry in 1991 — but it was snubbed by Oscar in 1969. The drama was nominated in four categories, winning only in Best Special Visual Effects.

Blade Runner
Oscar's anti-sci-fi bias became apparent again in 1983, when Ridley Scott's Blade Runner was nearly totally ignored (it only got two nominations, in technical categories). The futuristic noir film — Scott's second big movie, after Alien, and the first (and, in some critics' minds, the best) Philip K. Dick adaptation — wasn't beloved by audiences when it was released: It didn't even manage to recoup its $28 million budget. But in the last 20 years, critics and audiences have had a change of heart (Siskel and Ebert reportedly gave it two thumbs up in '92, after panning it in '82).


Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Steven Spielberg's 1977 follow-up to monster hit Jaws was nominated for eight Oscars, but Best Picture was surprisingly not one of them. Critics and audiences seemed to adore the Richard Dreyfus-starring tale of an alien visitation; it raked in more than six times its budget at the box office. Encounters also came in at No. 64 on the AFI's top 100 films list and implanted a simple five-note musical sequence firmly in the popular consciousness. Along with Star Wars, also released that year, it set a new standard for special visual effects in filmmaking and inspired a gaggle of special-effects-driven flicks.

Crimes and Misdemeanors
Considering that director-writer-actor Woody Allen doesn't put much stock in the Academy Awards, it's no real surprise that Oscar snubbed him in 1991. To be fair, the competition — Dances With Wolves (which won), Awakenings, Ghost, Goodfellas, The Godfather, Part III — was mostly worthy. Nonetheless, Allen's tragicomic split-story morality tale was surprisingly underappreciated by voters, especially considering that it hit high notes with critics and the director's ardent fan base.

Do the Right Thing
Spike Lee's story of rising racial tension on a hot New York City day faced stiff competition at the 1990 Oscars: Dead Poets Society, My Left Foot, Born on the Fourth of July, and eventual winner Driving Miss Daisy prevented it from being nominated. More than a few critics lauded the film, though, and both the Los Angeles and the Chicago Film Critics Associations named it Best Picture. Lee established himself as a deft, political filmmaker with Do the Right Thing and went on to make numerous thought-provoking (and Oscar-ignored) works like Jungle Fever and Malcolm X.

Psycho
Has Oscar ignored any director more blatantly than Alfred Hitchcock? Never once did Hitchcock take home an Academy Award for Best Picture, or even for Best Director. Psycho was a certifiable cultural phenomenon in 1960, with a surprise twist that shocked audiences and prompted an ad campaign urging people not to reveal the secret. The film is packed with memorable lines, features an indelible performance by Anthony Perkins, and contains a shower murder scene that Premiere magazine recently ranked No. 27 on its list of the most memorable movie moments of all time.

Singin' in the Rain
What's the big deal? Singin' in the Rain only sports the most famous dance number in Hollywood history. Gene Kelly's five minutes of umbrella-spinning song and dance through a rain-slicked city street helped land the musical on countless best-of-all-time lists. Still, it wasn't enough to get the attention of Oscar — the only nomination it landed was for Best Music. The Best Picture winner at the 1953 ceremony? Cecil B. DeMille's The Greatest Show on Earth.

Some Like it Hot
Widely regarded as one of funniest movies of all time, Billy Wilder's Some Like It Hot didn't exactly set the world on fire at the 1960 Academy Awards ceremony, taking home only a statue for Best Costume Design. Sure, the Jack Lemmon-Tony Curtis starrer grabbed noms for Wilder's direction and screenplay, and Lemmon was singled out for his in-drag performance, but Oscar ignored the gender-bending comedy in the Best Picture category. As Tony Curtis says in the film's closing scene, "Well, nobody's perfect."

Thelma and Louise
Here's a list of the categories in which Thelma & Louise received an Oscar nomination: Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress (two nominations — for both Geena Davis' and Susan Sarandon's performances), Best Cinematography, and Best Editing. Notice one conspicuous absence? You guessed it; Best Picture. The road-trip drama with a cliffhanger ending was pushed out of the category by The Silence of the Lambs, JFK, Beauty and the Beast, The Prince of Tides, and … Bugsy? Hard to believe.

This is Spinal Tap
It's no surprise that Rob Reiner's mockumentary was ignored during awards season; comedies are rarely voter faves, and a film about a heavy metal band just doesn't mesh with the staid tastes of the Academy. Nonetheless, there are few comedies that have had as much cultural impact as Tap. Just look at the number of frequently cited lines: "These go to 11," "You can't really dust for vomit," and "It's such a fine line between stupid and clever," for instance. If that's not enough to convince you, Tap was added to the National Film Registry in 2002.

FILMS THAT ALMOST MADE THE LIST

1. Brazil
This Orwellian sci-fi fantasy from Terry Gilliam has become a cult favorite, even though it tanked at the box office when it was released. Widely recognized as one of the most complex satires ever made, Brazil almost wasn't released in 1985. Universal didn't exactly "get" Gilliam's vision — which includes stunning sets, trippy special effects, and an eclectic cast to give audiences a mind-bending look at a brave new dystopian world — and recut the film to give it a happy ending.

2. Full Metal Jacket
For all the accolades he received, the late Stanley Kubrick wasn't exactly adored by the Academy. Two of his movies made our top 15, and two others (Paths of Glory, Spartacus) nearly did. War may be hell, but Kubrick's Oscar-nominated script (which he co-wrote) about Marines training for Vietnam is considered sublime. Vincent D'Onofrio's disturbed Pvt. "Gomer Pyle" and real-life drill sergeant R. Lee Ermey's abusive, salty-mouthed Sgt. Hartman remain unforgettable characters.

3. Mulholland Drive
Most critics agree that this wild ride — as dizzying as a drive down San Francisco's Lombard Street — is David Lynch's best film since his equally odd and dark Blue Velvet. Mulholland has already made several reviewers' all-time best lists, sparked debates, spawned a comprehensive analysis from Salon.com, and launched the career of rising star Naomi Watts. And the consensus is that it's one of those rare movies that become more enriching with each repeat viewing.

4. The Usual Suspects
The buzz for this crime thriller got louder after its 1995 Sundance premiere, and though its box-office gross wasn't stellar, Suspects found a devoted audience on video. The clever script earned Christopher McQuarrie an Academy Award and helped Kevin Spacey to Oscar gold for his lead performance, but Suspects didn't get noticed in the Best Picture category. The 1996 awards featured deserving nominees — Sense and Sensibility, The Postman, Babe, Apollo 13, and Braveheart (which won) — but it's still surprising that Keyser Soze managed to escape on Oscar night.

5. Vertigo
Alfred Hitchcock's films, like Stanley Kubrick's, were ignored frequently — North by Northwest and Rear Window also failed to receive Best Picture nominations. Vertigo is ranked No. 61 on AFI's list of the 100 Greatest American Movies, No. 19 by both Leonard Maltin and Entertainment Weekly, and No. 11 by TV Guide. And EW called Jimmy Stewart's creepy performance as kinky detective Scottie Ferguson the best ever to be ignored by the Academy

- It's a damn good list. Any more that are noteworthy? It can be in any category, not just best picture. I'm still sour over Ellen Burstyn losing to Julia Roberts for best actress. grrrrr...


xerxes

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Reply #1 on: February 20, 2003, 10:47:21 AM
Quote from: cbrad4d

Psycho
 Never once did Hitchcock take home an Academy Award for Best Picture


i believe rebecca won best picture


MacGuffin

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Reply #2 on: February 20, 2003, 10:58:31 AM
Quote from: xerxes
Quote from: cbrad4d

Psycho
 Never once did Hitchcock take home an Academy Award for Best Picture


i believe rebecca won best picture


It did. But David O. Selznik was the producer and was his Oscar to take home.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Rudie Obias

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Reply #3 on: February 20, 2003, 11:59:25 AM
Quote from: cbrad4d




4. The Usual Suspects
The buzz for this crime thriller got louder after its 1995 Sundance premiere, and though its box-office gross wasn't stellar, Suspects found a devoted audience on video. The clever script earned Christopher McQuarrie an Academy Award and helped Kevin Spacey to Oscar gold for his lead performance, but Suspects didn't get noticed in the Best Picture category. The 1996 awards featured deserving nominees — Sense and Sensibility, The Postman, Babe, Apollo 13, and Braveheart (which won) — but it's still surprising that Keyser Soze managed to escape on Oscar night.



OVER FUCKIN' RATED!!!  why am i the only one that feels this way?
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Reply #4 on: February 20, 2003, 12:23:50 PM
I agree only with 2001, Singin' In the Rain, and Do the Right Thing. All others were really not worthy of an oscar or were made by directors that had much better work that was ignored. But who gives a shit what the oscars decide to acclaim since no one cites for anything ear truth in judging quality.

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©brad

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Reply #5 on: February 20, 2003, 12:35:42 PM
Quote from: rudieob
Quote from: cbrad4d




4. The Usual Suspects
The buzz for this crime thriller got louder after its 1995 Sundance premiere, and though its box-office gross wasn't stellar, Suspects found a devoted audience on video. The clever script earned Christopher McQuarrie an Academy Award and helped Kevin Spacey to Oscar gold for his lead performance, but Suspects didn't get noticed in the Best Picture category. The 1996 awards featured deserving nominees — Sense and Sensibility, The Postman, Babe, Apollo 13, and Braveheart (which won) — but it's still surprising that Keyser Soze managed to escape on Oscar night.



OVER FUCKIN' RATED!!!  why am i the only one that feels this way?


Because you're a fucking idiot. That's my guess


life_boy

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Reply #6 on: February 20, 2003, 12:48:54 PM
Quote from: cbrad4d
Quote from: rudieob
Quote from: cbrad4d




4. The Usual Suspects
The buzz for this crime thriller got louder after its 1995 Sundance premiere, and though its box-office gross wasn't stellar, Suspects found a devoted audience on video. The clever script earned Christopher McQuarrie an Academy Award and helped Kevin Spacey to Oscar gold for his lead performance, but Suspects didn't get noticed in the Best Picture category. The 1996 awards featured deserving nominees — Sense and Sensibility, The Postman, Babe, Apollo 13, and Braveheart (which won) — but it's still surprising that Keyser Soze managed to escape on Oscar night.



OVER FUCKIN' RATED!!!  why am i the only one that feels this way?


Because you're a fucking idiot. That's my guess


Actually, he's not an idiot and he's not the only person who feels this way.  But, this was talked about on a different post already.


Xixax

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Reply #7 on: February 20, 2003, 12:49:01 PM
Geez, you people crack me up.

I think the whole board is PMSing this week.
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life_boy

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Reply #8 on: February 20, 2003, 12:54:00 PM
That is a pretty good list.  I was surprised to see Full Metal Jacket and Crimes and Misdemeanors (which was 1989 not 1991 but the awards ceremony was in 1990) on there.  That is one of my favorite Woody Allen movies.


Jeremy Blackman

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Reply #9 on: February 20, 2003, 01:55:19 PM
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I think the whole board is PMSing this week.


I know I am.  :roll:
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Gold Trumpet

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Reply #10 on: February 20, 2003, 05:46:01 PM
don't try to be too charming cbr. People may think you are trying to be being nice.

~rougerum