Author Topic: A Tortellini Story - journey into food  (Read 11975 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #45 on: June 08, 2004, 05:21:07 PM »
0
Quote from: mogwai
looks great, kotte. despite the low budget, how many takes did you do for the dolly in?


4 takes...


Quote from: mutinyco
Having trouble viewing the teaser. Keeps stopping midway.


Hmm...odd... :?

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #46 on: July 25, 2004, 01:05:57 PM »
0
Could someone tell me the process of online editing?

How do you translate the effects (fades slow mo's) you create in, say Premiere? I mean how does it all work?

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #47 on: September 14, 2004, 10:54:11 PM »
0
Quote from: kotte
Could someone tell me the process of online editing?

How do you translate the effects (fades slow mo's) you create in, say Premiere? I mean how does it all work?



I know this now! :)

Okay, so I just got from a meeting at Cinepost, a post-production company focusing solely on sound. This is what I need to do and what it will cost:

Clean up dialogue tracks - $1315 (Get good sound!!!)
Sound design - $1537
Final mix - $1062
Optical tone negative - $285
Developing the tone neg. - $110

And this is just sound!! It's fucking expensive shooting on film!

matt35mm

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 3239
  • Bony old behind.
  • Respect: +491
    • My Films on Vimeo
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #48 on: September 14, 2004, 11:02:49 PM »
0
Wouldn't it cost the same for digital (except for the last two things involving negatives)?

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2004, 06:05:38 AM »
0
Quote from: matt35mm
Wouldn't it cost the same for digital (except for the last two things involving negatives)?


You're right, it would. But when you put down $6000 dollars in a film as opposed to 30 bucks you really wanna get everything right.

md

  • The Ultimate Boon
  • ***
  • Posts: 469
  • Respect: +42
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #50 on: September 15, 2004, 02:21:40 PM »
0
Quote from: kotte
Quote from: kotte
Could someone tell me the process of online editing?

How do you translate the effects (fades slow mo's) you create in, say Premiere? I mean how does it all work?



I know this now! :)


would you ever like to share?  cant see the trailer either...but the stills look very professional...thanks
"look hard at what pleases you and even harder at what doesn't" ~ carolyn forche

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #51 on: September 15, 2004, 02:36:54 PM »
0
Quote from: md
Quote from: kotte
Quote from: kotte
Could someone tell me the process of online editing?

How do you translate the effects (fades slow mo's) you create in, say Premiere? I mean how does it all work?



I know this now! :)


would you ever like to share?  cant see the trailer either...but the stills look very professional...thanks


Here's a working trailer.
Right-click. Save as...

Online editing? It's easy as hell :)
Edit you film at home in Avid Xpress, Final Cut or on something else. Print an EDL and run down to the online editing place. Online editing isn't more than you sitting next to someone editing your original footage (Digibeta?) from scratch from your EDL.

pete

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 5516
  • freakin huge
  • Respect: +384
    • my site
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #52 on: September 15, 2004, 03:38:45 PM »
0
not working?
“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
- Buster Keaton

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #53 on: September 15, 2004, 03:46:51 PM »
0
Right-click. Save as...

Ghostboy

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 4893
  • Respect: +381
    • http://www.road-dog-productions.com/
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #54 on: September 15, 2004, 04:24:33 PM »
0
My super16mm short film was so on-budget until I got to the post production phase. That's the real killer, right there. I never even did an offline edit. I considered cutting the negative (myself) and then transferring that to an HD master, but decided it wasn't really worth it in the long run.

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #55 on: September 15, 2004, 04:53:21 PM »
0
Quote from: Ghostboy
My super16mm short film was so on-budget until I got to the post production phase. That's the real killer, right there.


Yeah, seriously. I so want it to be over and done with. I'm tired of it. It seems like a never ending journey.

I made a decision a couple of weeks ago with my Co-producer. I'm not gonna put one more dime of my own money into this project. I'm deep into the process of getting postprod. funding.
I mean, if no one wanna give me some cash to finish this project, is it worth putting a fortune of your own into it...

metroshane

  • The Ultimate Boon
  • ***
  • Posts: 458
  • Respect: +1
    • http://www.explosivofilms.com
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #56 on: September 15, 2004, 06:29:28 PM »
0
Well, the first rule of film (when I was in film school) was "never use your own money".  But then that was before the rodriguez's of the world and digital filmmaking.  Now, it's an investment.  Do you think you can make your money back?
We live in an age that reads too much to be intelligent and thinks too much to be beautiful.

kotte

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2051
  • camera assistant. camera operator. carnivore.
  • Respect: +9
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2004, 04:05:18 AM »
0
Quote from: metroshane
Do you think you can make your money back?


Nope. It's a short. That would be far-fetched.
But I mean, I didn't do it for the money. I saw this project as film school. I've learned so fucking much about everything pretty much. It's been grea.

metroshane

  • The Ultimate Boon
  • ***
  • Posts: 458
  • Respect: +1
    • http://www.explosivofilms.com
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #58 on: September 16, 2004, 10:08:50 AM »
0
It's very honorable to do things for the art...but we also have to be realistic.   This is also a business and you have to be fiscally responsible if you want to continue to make films.  If you spend your own life savings on a movie...then you may be too in debt to finance anything in the future.  Or if you want anyone to invest in you...then you want to show them how you spend money responsibly.  My philosophy is to do the best with what you have.  That's all anyone can ask.  

I'm glad you enjoyed the experience.  Now tackle the hardest part about filmmaking...raising the budget.  Full disclosure:  I financed my own film, but I made a budget that wouldn't break me and I stuck to it and made comprimises.
We live in an age that reads too much to be intelligent and thinks too much to be beautiful.

matt35mm

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 3239
  • Bony old behind.
  • Respect: +491
    • My Films on Vimeo
A Tortellini Story - journey into food
« Reply #59 on: September 16, 2004, 07:57:41 PM »
0
I don't feel that the rule should be not to spend your own money--but I definitely think that you should never borrow money to make a movie unless you plan to make it back.  Don't go in debt--that's what will ruin you.

I've poured a bunch of money into my movies (around $8,000).  But I'm a high school student with no financial responsibilties.  I got a job specifically to pay for my movies, with absolutely no goal to make the money back.  It's not always a business--I'm effectively paying for the experience.

It does open doors, however, so that's a benefit that you can reap.  My first movie (Poof!), at the very least, showed that I was more serious about filmmaking than anyone else at my school--so I've become the go-to guy for filmmaking stuff, which has given me more options.  There were people that I couldn't convince to be a part of my first movie who now actually pursue me.  It has definitely made me feel more powerful--I now have a small posse of fans to help me get my next project up and running.

I feel that it's been worth it, definitely.

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy