Author Topic: Editing Theory  (Read 16830 times)

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MacGuffin

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Editing Theory
« Reply #75 on: July 11, 2005, 12:28:52 PM »
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Quote from: themodernage02
mac, have you watched this thing yet?


Yes. It was onTV a while back:
http://xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=7044
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modage

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Editing Theory
« Reply #76 on: July 11, 2005, 02:43:09 PM »
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oh sweet.  everyone watch this if you're interested in editing.  :yabbse-thumbup:
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killafilm

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Editing Theory
« Reply #77 on: July 15, 2005, 12:53:30 AM »
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Just thought I'd throw some stuff out there.

In the early days of film-making it was thought that women were also more attentive than men.  Thus you had "Script Girls" now the script supervisor, and many more female editors.  

Some editing theory(usage.. whatever) I really love is the jump cut.  Godard will say that he would use a jump cut because he had no other options, but it did/does leave an impression on the viewer.

I'm thinking along the beginning of Full Metal Jacket, Vanilla Sky and ect... more modern filmmakers have found many clever uses of jump cuts, freeze frames, and other editing techniques born out of the New Wave.

and I'll also single out Leslie Jones editing of PDL.  I can't really think of any other movie building up it's scenes in such a bizaar fashion.  The pacing of that movie is just... awesome.

soixante

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Editing Theory
« Reply #78 on: July 15, 2005, 02:34:01 AM »
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Does anyone know who first figured out connecting one shot to another?  The very first films, I believe, were just very short, one continous shot.  Someone obviously realized one shot could be spliced to another, and then another.  But who was it?  Has any serious film scholar figured this out?
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MacGuffin

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Editing Theory
« Reply #79 on: July 15, 2005, 02:38:13 AM »
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Quote from: soixante
Does anyone know who first figured out connecting one shot to another?  The very first films, I believe, were just very short, one continous shot.  Someone obviously realized one shot could be spliced to another, and then another.  But who was it?  Has any serious film scholar figured this out?


Can't remember his name, but, if I remember correctly, whoever it was is mentioned in the Cutting Edge doc mod and I discussed at the top of the page.
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Ghostboy

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Editing Theory
« Reply #80 on: July 15, 2005, 03:14:50 AM »
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To the extent of my knowledge, although he wasn't the very first to employ juxtaposition, Edwin Porter (director of The Great Train Robbery usually gets the credit.

EDIT: consulting my dictionary of film, I see that G.A Smith and J. A Williamson and others from The Brighton School in England were the real innovators. They also apparently invented the close up.

The Perineum Falcon

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Editing Theory
« Reply #81 on: July 15, 2005, 04:58:51 AM »
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Georges Melies discovered the use of editing for special effects by mistake!

Fascinating.
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Just Withnail

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Editing Theory
« Reply #82 on: July 15, 2005, 12:10:21 PM »
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What's interesting is before films got a real sense of continuity, the consisted of the same action from different points of view. Jean Mirty in Psychology and aestethics of the cinema mentions early films where you'd see a speeding car go down a hill and run into a house. Then you'd see the interior of the house, still fine and untouched, only to have the car ram into it in that scene as well. Porter is mentioned quite a bit in the editing section of the book, at least in the history part.

Ravi

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Editing Theory
« Reply #83 on: July 15, 2005, 12:18:59 PM »
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Quote from: Just Withnail
What's interesting is before films got a real sense of continuity, the consisted of the same action from different points of view. Jean Mirty in Psychology and aestethics of the cinema mentions early films where you'd see a speeding car go down a hill and run into a house. Then you'd see the interior of the house, still fine and untouched, only to have the car ram into it in that scene as well. Porter is mentioned quite a bit in the editing section of the book, at least in the history part.


Didn't Battleship Potemkin have a sequence where a sailor is shown breaking a plate several different times, or was he breaking different plates?

Just Withnail

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Editing Theory
« Reply #84 on: July 15, 2005, 07:35:01 PM »
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Don't remember those shots, but the technique I mentioned was long out of practice by the time of Potemkin.

Bethie

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Editing Theory
« Reply #85 on: July 16, 2005, 02:42:25 AM »
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Quote from: Ravi
Quote from: Just Withnail
What's interesting is before films got a real sense of continuity, the consisted of the same action from different points of view. Jean Mirty in Psychology and aestethics of the cinema mentions early films where you'd see a speeding car go down a hill and run into a house. Then you'd see the interior of the house, still fine and untouched, only to have the car ram into it in that scene as well. Porter is mentioned quite a bit in the editing section of the book, at least in the history part.


Didn't Battleship Potemkin have a sequence where a sailor is shown breaking a plate several different times, or was he breaking different plates?


yo kid. its one.



I just scanned that from a book I own. If anyone wants to edit this and make it smaller or whatev, feel free.

I also scanned another page that explains all the boxes. want?

oh here http://www.worldisround.com/articles/193035/index.html thats where i put the scanned pages. go there and you can click enlarge. too bad you couldnt do that in real life, eh? haha
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pete

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Re: Editing Theory
« Reply #86 on: May 22, 2008, 11:57:25 PM »
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Jackie Chan the editor.
Really awful English though.
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socketlevel

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Re: Editing Theory
« Reply #87 on: August 07, 2009, 07:45:14 PM »
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In the early days of film-making it was thought that women were also more attentive than men.  Thus you had "Script Girls" now the script supervisor, and many more female editors.  


i know this is a really old post but it's dead wrong, and overly optimistic.  it's a much colder reality.  it's not a business model that producers and studios had preconceived notions of what each sex was good and used it to their advantage.  the truth is that script girls and editors were considered mundane jobs.  the editor was seen the same way as a tailor, someone that would cut and paste the film (literally) based on the director/producers intent. so women had these jobs because men were pig headed and didn't think women were creative... these positions were filled due to lack of interest from men, giving women undesirable tasks that was beneath what the men wanted to do.  sad but true. 

the editor wasn't considered a "creative" position to the studios until the late 50s early 60s, when the value of editing and how it influenced the rhetoric was finally considered integral to film.  this is why you see more male editors emerge then, and inversely it is why women have held a strong hold on editing to this day.
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ono

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Re: Editing Theory
« Reply #88 on: June 30, 2012, 11:42:47 AM »
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