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MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #60 on: March 08, 2007, 12:23:51 PM »
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Pixar's 'Toy Story 3,' 'Frog Princess' on tap
'TS3' script is by 'Sunshine' Oscar winner Michael Arndt
Source: Hollywood Reporter

NEW YORK - The Walt Disney Co.'s Pixar Animation Studios arm is in production on "Toy Story 3" and its fist hand-drawn animation project in years, "The Frog Princess," John Lasseter, chief creative officer, Pixar and Disney Animation Studios, said Thursday.

In an appearance during Disney's annual shareholder meeting in New Orleans, Lasseter said: "We are finally in production on 'Toy Story 3'," adding the film is scheduled to come out in 2010. Tom Hanks and Tim Allen are back on board to voice Buzz Lightyear and Woody.

The screenplay is by Michael Arndt, who just won the original screenplay Academy Award for "Little Miss Sunshine," according to Lasseter, who said: "We got a great story."

He also announced - to much applause - that Disney Animation has started production on "Frog Princess," which goes back to hand-drawn animation and classic Disney fairytales. "Aladdin" and "Little Mermaid" creators Ron Clements and John Musker are the creative forces behind the animated musical, which "takes place entirely in New Orleans," features "the very first African American Disney princess" and includes a "soulful singing alligator," Lasseter said.

In a special surprise, Randy Newman, who spent his childhood in New Orleans and is writing the music for the film, performed a song from "Frog Princess" to big applause. 

Discussing other animation projects that his team is currently working on, Lasseter mentioned Pixar's "Wall-E," written and directed by Andrew Stanton, the man behind "Finding Nemo." The film plays 700 years in the future when Wally is a little robot on Earth cleaning the trash-covered planet after the humans evacuated it.

Lasseter also plugged Disney Animation's "American Dog," directed by Chris Williams, about a dog with superpowers who suddenly realizes he is only a TV character and must learn to live in the real world.
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MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #61 on: June 10, 2007, 10:58:59 AM »
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Up (June 12, 2009)

Pete Docter, the Pixar lifer who made "Monsters Inc.," and co-director Bob Peterson are preparing this "coming-of-old-age story" about a seventysomething guy who lives in a house that "looks like your grandparents' house smelled." He befriends a clueless young Wilderness Ranger and gets into lots of alter kocker altercations. Says Pixar: "Our hero travels the globe, fights beasts and villains and eats dinner at 3:30 in the afternoon."

Toy Story 3 (2010)

Originality is a Pixar hallmark. None of the company's films have been based on fairy tales or novels, and only "Toy Story" has spawned sequels. Why a third adventure for Woody (Tom Hanks) and Buzz (Tim Allen)? "We got an idea we thought would be really great," says Lee Unkrich, who co-directed "Toy Story 2" and "Finding Nemo" and graduates to full director status here. "We're just starting to write the story," he confides, adding, "I wake up every morning hoping for a eureka moment." He and the Brain Trust have already had one inspiration: they've asked Randy Newman to write the score. Or was that a no-brainer?
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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modage

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #62 on: June 10, 2007, 02:12:59 PM »
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Pete Docter, the Pixar lifer who made "Monsters Inc.," and co-director Bob Peterson are preparing this "coming-of-old-age story" about a seventysomething guy who lives in a house that "looks like your grandparents' house smelled." He befriends a clueless young Wilderness Ranger and gets into lots of alter kocker altercations. Says Pixar: "Our hero travels the globe, fights beasts and villains and eats dinner at 3:30 in the afternoon."

that sounds great!  as i was saying...

pixar are NOT playing it safe.  its almost as if their story department came up with pitches for a movie that nobody would want to see and as a challenge they have to make people want to see them.  i • pixar.

so FUCK YOU penguins and other cute animals.  now Toy Story 3 can be their Oceans 13 if their 3 riskier movies flop in the meantime!
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #63 on: June 23, 2007, 01:05:19 AM »
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Bird on Toy Story 3 & Incredibles 2

ComingSoon.net got a chance to chat on Friday with director Brad Bird at the press day for his new animated-adventure, Rataouille. Naturally, we asked him about Toy Story 3 and a possible sequel to The Incredibles.

"It's going to be good," Bird said about the third "Toy Story." "We wouldn't do it if we didn't think it could be good." The third film, to be voiced again by Tom Hanks and Tim Allen, is coming to theaters in 2010.

But would he do another "Incredibles"? "I do if I can come up with a story that is as good or better than the first one. If I can come up with a "Toy Story 2" with "The Incredibles," then I would do it in a second. I have pieces that I think are good, but I don't have them all together."

Bird said sequels aren't part of Pixar's business plan. "We've made one and we're going to make another... We don't make it for any reason other than if it's a movie we want to see and a story we're excited to tell, we will go after it. We don't do it for money. Walt Disney once said that he doesn't make films to make money, he makes money to make films. That's very much Pixar's philosophy. It's why we're in the game."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #64 on: July 11, 2007, 07:25:45 PM »
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Cars 2 to be released after TS3!
Source: jvpixarnews

According to a very reliable anonymous source Cars 2 will be released after Toy Story 3! So it looks like the rumors are true! We are still waiting for an official announcement from Pixar though. Maybe this could be Brad Lewis' unannounced project that he has been talking about?

So Pixar is going to put out 2 sequels in a row. Pixar always likes a good challenge.

One question I have is that Paul Newman has retried, In the rumor about a Cars 2 in early June of this year Paul Newman said that Pixar was making a Cars 2, so how would he know about a Cars 2 unless someone has told him or he has signed up for it, or maybe he’s already done some voice work, but I doubt it.

I expect Cars 2 to be Pixar’s 2011 release and John Carter of Mars to be Pixar 2012 release.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Pubrick

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #65 on: July 11, 2007, 11:23:10 PM »
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i hope the whole movie is cars jumping over sharks.

Cars 2: Shark Tale 2
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Kal

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #66 on: July 12, 2007, 04:27:27 PM »
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maybe its time to change the title of this thread... considering Disney bought Jobs and Pixar??


Redlum

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #67 on: September 02, 2007, 09:39:32 AM »
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I just got back from a Dali exhibition where they were playing his Disney collaboration called Destino. It was one of the most beautiful animated shorts I've ever seen.

All I can find about a DVD release is a rumour of 2007. Just wondering if anyone here hasheard anything else about it.

http://www.animationartconservation.com/destiny_of_dali_destino.html
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davidchili

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #68 on: September 02, 2007, 10:18:52 AM »
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i hope the whole movie is cars jumping over sharks.

Cars 2: Shark Tale 2
That would end up looking like another Finding Nemo.

Just wondering if anyone here hasheard anything else about it.
Big surprise to me that Dali had worked with Disney.
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Astrostic

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #69 on: September 02, 2007, 02:51:46 PM »
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Just wondering if anyone here hasheard anything else about it.

It was played before prints of Triplets of Belleville when that was screening a few years ago.  I totally forgot about it until now, I remember really enjoying it, though.

davidchili

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #70 on: September 02, 2007, 09:11:00 PM »
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I found some clips from Destino on Youtube and  they are pretty amazing, kinda remind me of Peter Chung's early animation
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MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #71 on: October 10, 2007, 02:33:08 AM »
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Documentary brings "Pixar" struggles to life
Source: Hollywood Reporter

The "overnight" success of Pixar Animation Studios seemed like a smooth rocket ride, but Leslie Iwerks' documentary about the cartoon behemoth is a jolting reminder that it was a risky business venture.

An unstable combination of sheer determination, unending struggle, initial failures and gut instinct, it took an almost karmic combination of talent and fortuitous events to get that baby off the ground. Many people participated, but "The Pixar Story" rightly zeroes in on John Lasseter, Ed Catmull and their entrepreneurial godfather and backer, Steve Jobs, who all but willed the Pixar success into reality.

Having the run of the studios' archival footage, going back to before Pixar existed, and unparalleled access to just about everybody she needed to interview, Iwerks -- who previously made "The Hand Behind the Mouse," a documentary about her famous animator grandfather, Ub Iwerks -- delivers an incisive and often inspiring story of a group of super talents for whom failure was not an option.

After its world premiere at the Mill Valley Film Festival, Iwerks says she means to qualify the film for Oscar consideration. She then hopes to secure a theatrical release. But its real value will undoubtedly be as a DVD with expanded footage of the interviews and behind-the-scenes peeks that didn't make it into the 86-minute feature. This film will be an invaluable resource for film and animation historians, as well as multitudes of Pixar fans, from here to infinity and beyond.

Iwerks counts herself among those fans. So her portrait, narrated by Stacy Keach, is admiring, not journalistic. Even so, the most hard-bitten investigator would be hard-pressed not experience wonder at such a rousing story.

Computer animation was around long before Pixar. Animators in Europe and North America were experimenting with this combination of art and science in shorts dating back to the '70s. Yet there was often a lack of warmth in the designs, and representing humans, even cartoony ones, was a challenge. Features were out of the question.

Lasseter and Catmull were among the first to see the future so clearly. Lasseter came out of Cal Arts with training in Disney animation. He worked at Disneyland in Anaheim and eventually landed a job in Disney's Burbank studios. When "Tron," one of the first features to mix computer-generated action with live-action, came out of Walt Disney Pictures in 1982, Lasseter pushed for and got a unit that experimented with 3-D animation.

But such was the fear of the computer -- that somehow the computer would replace humans rather than becoming a new tool for animators -- that Lasseter was actually fired by Disney when he completed his project.

He joined the computer division of Lucasfilm, where he met Catmull, a computer scientist trained at the University of Utah, who helped develop digital image compositing technology.

In 1986, Jobs bought Lucasfilms' digital division and founded Pixar with Lasseter and Catmull as his key men.

After losing $1 million a year for five years, Jobs needed to see a return on his investment. So Pixar put "Toy Story," the first feature-length computer-animated film ever, into production.

"Some of us had never even worked on a movie," Lasseter notes.

Initially, Disney, which was to release "Toy Story," imposed its ideas on the production, to disastrous results. The first trial reel was awful, former vice chairman Roy Disney recalls.

Only when Pixar animators tore up those notes and went with gut instincts did the production take off. The worldwide gross of $350 million by "Toy Story" (1995) led Jobs to Wall Street, where he raised $132 million through an IPO. That put Pixar on a firm footing and led to a string of hits.

The company has never experienced either a critical or box office failure, though the film makes clear that "Toy Story 2," which had to start all over with nine months to go, was a close call.

What has made each film successful, Lasseter insists, is "not the idea but the people." The Pixar staff, working with new directors hired either from within the company -- such as Andrew Stanton and Pete Docter -- or, in the case of Brad Bird, from outside, has been up to the challenge to stretch the digital envelope as each new story drives the need for innovation.

After Disney, under CEO Bob Iger, acquired Pixar in January 2006, Lasseter and Catmull were put in charge of reinvigorating the Burbank studio. They have given directors more creative control of their projects and will return to traditional animation techniques instead of relying solely on computer animation, a reversal of a decision made by former chairman and CEO Michael Eisner.

The film, with its talking-heads interviews, does pile on the tech talk pretty heavily at times. But Iwerks more than makes up for this with home movies by the various Pixar pixies at work and play -- it's often hard to tell the difference -- and even Lasseter's own Student Academy Award-winning shorts. And the many interviewees -- from Tom Hanks, Tim Allen and Billy Crystal to George Lucas and Pixar animators -- do extremely lucid jobs of explaining that technology in terms of the artistic impact on each film.

It took Iwerks six years to make this film because the Pixar story kept evolving even as she worked. One suspects a sequel, were she so inclined, might be even more fascinating.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Ravi

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #72 on: November 06, 2007, 11:11:01 AM »
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Moved here from Ratatouille thread after I fucked up splitting the topic  :oops:

http://jimhillmedia.com/blogs/jim_hill/archive/2007/11/02/a-special-toon-much-of-a-good-thing-edition-of-why-for.aspx

A special "Toon Much of a Good Thing" edition of Why For

Jim Hill's back with even more answers to your Disney-related questions. This time around, Jim talks about why Walt Disney Home Entertainment stopped producing 2-disc versions of those new Disney / Pixar DVDs as well as revealing that Walt Disney Animation Studios may already have a second traditionally animated feature in the works
Print Article

First up, Danny writes in to ask:

    Jim,

    Any reason that you know of why Pixar started skimping on their DVD packages? Up to and including "The Incredibles," no company did the medium justice better than Pixar. But the discs for "Cars" and "Rataouille" (which I have an advanced copy of) are pathetic in comparison. Most notably absent are audio commentaries from Lasseter and Bird and little to no coverage of the Pixar artists.

    Are there fully-loaded versions on the horizon, or some other reason to why Pixar DVDs have become so run-of-the-mill?

    Thanks for the great site!

    Danny


Dear Danny --

Given that I am regularly accused by JHM readers of being far too tough on that Emeryville-based animation studio, let me say -- right from the get-go here -- that this single disc thing isn't Pixar's fault.

If John Lasseter & Brad Bird had their way, the theatrical release of every new Pixar film would immediately be followed by a multi-disc edition of that same movie. We're talking about a DVD that would then walk you through every phase of production, that would go into great detail about how that particular picture was made.

Which I know is just what all you Pixar and/or animation fans would really like to see ... But here's the harsh reality, kids: 95% of the people who actually purchase these new Disney / Pixar titles (at least during the first two weeks that these films are out on store shelves) aren't actually animation fans. But -- rather -- they're parents who just want something new that they can then drop into the family DVD player. Which will hopefully keep the kiddies quiet for an hour or so, so Mommy & Daddy can then get some work done.

Seriously, folks. That's what Walt Disney Home Entertainment has learned over the past 5 years through extensive survey work and consumer products testing. That the group that buys the largest number of new Disney / Pixar DVDs (i.e. parents of small children) just don't care for the two disc editions of these films.

Why For? Would you believe that it's because Mom & Dad are concerned that -- in their rush to load this new DVD into the player -- that they might accidentally drop the wrong disc into the machine? Which will then cause their kid to complain about how they're not able to see the movie. Which now negates the whole point of buying this new Disney / Pixar film in the first place. Which was to provide these parents with something that can then entertain and/or distract their children for a few hours.

Look, I know that that sounds a little cold-hearted. But the way I hear it, that's actually why WDHE opted to go with single disk editions of all of the new Disney / Pixar releases. Because that's what parents really wanted.

In fact, to address the ease-of-use concerns that some parents have with the DVD format ... Well, that's why Walt Disney Home Entertainment invented the FastPlay system. Which effectively allows Mom or Dad to just drop the newest Disney DVD into the family player and then walk away. All on its own, without anyone having to navigate through any menus, this disc will begin to play.

Mind you, before this DVD starts showing the main feature, it will first run coming attractions for every soon-to-be-released Disney / Pixar theatrical film and/or DVD. Which means that any child who's actually watched this disc will be well indoctrinated about what new movies they should be asking Mommy & Daddy to take them to and/or which DVD to ask for next. But for some parents ... That's a relatively small price to pay for a little peace and quiet.

As for us hardcore animation fans ... Not to worry: WDHE's business plan does eventually call for two disc editions of these new Disney / Pixar films to hit store shelves. But usually two to three years after the release of the original DVD versions of that same movie. More to the point, the multi-disc editions of these films will deliberately be sold at a much higher price point. So that the Mouse gets the maximum amount of return off of what is then basically a library title.

Of course, another reason that Walt Disney Home Entertainment has been stinting on the Extra Features that it's been folding into its DVDs lately is that they now want consumers to start buying their new Disney / Pixar titles in the Blu-Ray format. Take -- for example -- the Disney Blu-Ray version of "Cars" that hits store shelves next Tuesday. This Hi Def disc features a never-before-seen deleted scene from that John Lasseter film. Plus -- if you take advantage of this Blu-Ray DVD's "Cine-Explore" option -- Lasseter himself will walk you through the making of this movie. All this, plus the "Car Finder" game. Which then allows you to hunt for the 200 different makes & models that Pixar created for this road picture.

"And will those Extra Features be offered on a non-Blu-Ray DVD version of 'Cars' ?," you ask. Well, the way I hear it, WDHE doesn't have any plans to release a disc like that anytime soon. So if you want to hear John Lasseter's insights about how "Cars" actually came together ... You're going to have to get yourself a Blu-Ray player.

Sorry about that.

I saw a mouse in my house and stopped loving this film.

thanks for the article, Ravi. 

this sucks ass.  i really wish with Lasseter in charge at Disney they would be able to do something about this.  looks like i'll be waiting a few years to buy this one...

MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #73 on: January 24, 2008, 10:22:12 AM »
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Toy Story Trio Goes 3-D!
Source: Walt Disney Studios

The Walt Disney Studios is taking the latest advances in digital 3-D technology "to infinity and beyond" with ambitious plans to debut new Disney Digital 3-D(TM) versions of Disney-Pixar's Toy Story on October 2nd, 2009, and Toy Story 2 on February 12th, 2010, it was announced by Dick Cook, chairman of The Walt Disney Studios. Both of these beloved animated features are being newly converted to 3-D in advance of the June 18th, 2010 release of Disney-Pixar's Toy Story 3, which is being produced as a 3-D motion picture and will represent the state-of-the-art for the genre. Veteran Pixar filmmaker Lee Unkrich (co-director Toy Story 2) is directing.

Academy Award®-winning filmmaker John Lasseter (director of the first two "Toy Story" films and chief creative officer for Disney and Pixar Animation Studios) will personally oversee the creative side of the 3-D conversions for Toy Story and Toy Story 2 with his acclaimed team of technical wizards handling all the necessary steps in the conversion process.

Commenting on the announcement, Cook said, "We are committed to bringing moviegoers the best and most exciting 3-D movie experience, and we think they're going to love seeing Buzz Lightyear, Woody, and all the wonderful 'Toy Story' cast of characters in an eye popping and dazzling way. John Lasseter and the animation team are putting all their passion and hard work into making this the greatest 3-D experience yet, and we're excited to share their efforts with audiences everywhere."

Lasseter added, "The 'Toy Story' films and characters will always hold a very special place in our hearts and we're so excited to be bringing this landmark film back for audiences to enjoy in a whole new way thanks to the latest in 3-D technology. I am sure that this is going to be nothing short of fantastic and people are going to be blown away by the experience. With 'Toy Story 3' shaping up to be another great adventure for Buzz, Woody and the gang from Andy's room, we thought it would be great to let audiences experience the first two films all over again and in a brand new way. 3-D offers lots of great new possibilities for the art of animation and we will continue to use this new technology to tell our stories in the best possible way."

In converting Toy Story and Toy Story 2 to state-of-the-art 3-D films, the technical team is retrieving all of the original digital elements and rebuilding them in 3-D.

Originally released by Walt Disney Pictures in 1995, Toy Story was the first feature film from Pixar Animation Studios and director John Lasseter. The film went on to receive Oscar® nominations for Original Score, Original Song, and Screenplay, and earned Lasseter a Special Achievement Award "for the development and inspired application of techniques that have made possible the first feature-length computer-animated film." Toy Story 2 was released in 1999, and reunited voice talents Tom Hanks and Tim Allen, in their roles as Woody and Buzz. The film became one of the most popular animated features of all time, and received an Academy Award® nomination for Original Song.
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MacGuffin

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Re: Steve Jobs and Pixar vs. Disney
« Reply #74 on: April 08, 2008, 06:52:27 PM »
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BREAKING: Disney/Pixar Announce Upcoming Slate!

This just in: Today in New York City, our Moviefone colleague Kevin Polowy attended the Disney/Pixar Animation Presentation hosted by Dick Cook and John Lasseter. Apparently, a whole handful of new, upcoming titles were announced -- some of which we've known about and some brand new. Additionally, they screened 30 minutes of WALL-E footage and announced that Sigourney Weaver would do a voice in the film. Kevin reported back, saying the footage "looked really strong, and turned this skeptic into a believer." (I don't know how Kevin was worried about this one; it's just too damn adorable.) Aside from WALL-E, here are highlights of what else was announced:

Up will follow WALL-E for Pixar, featuring the voices of Ed Asner, Christopher Plummer, John Ratzenberger and Jordan Nagai.

Tinkerbell will go direct-to-DVD, followed by three sequels. So four Tinkerbell films all together.

Rapunzel is back! Not only that, but Rapunzel will become the first classic Disney story being done in CGI.
King of the Elves is another film coming from Disney animation in 2012, and it's based on a Phillip K. Dick story.

Toy Story and Toy Story 2 to be released in 3-D in 2009 and 2010.
Toy Story 3 hits theaters on June 18, 2010
Newt will be Pixar's film in 2011, and it comes with this description: "What happens when the last remaining male and female blue-footed newts on the planet are forced together by science to save the species, and they can't stand each other?
Cars 2 coming in 2012!

UPDATE: Full press release after the jump, including more titles from Disney animation ...

DISNEY'S 'FAIRIES' DIRECT-TO-DVD FRANCHISE WILL ALSO DEBUT

NEW YORK, April 8, 2008 /PRNewswire/ -- The Walt Disney Studios unveiled a diverse and ambitious slate of 10 new animated feature films from Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios to be released through the year 2012 at a New York press conference held today by Dick Cook, chairman of The Walt Disney Studios, and John Lasseter, chief creative officer for Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios.

The line-up includes new films from Disney and Pixar's accomplished team of filmmakers, and features vocal performances by such top celebrity talents as John Travolta and Miley Cyrus ("Bolt"), Reese Witherspoon, Billy Connolly and Emma Thompson ("The Bear and the Bow"), Anika Noni Rose and John Goodman ("The Princess and the Frog"), as well as return engagements by Tom Hanks, Tim Allen and the rest of the "Toy Story" vocal ensemble ("Toy Story 3"). The roster of new animated features includes six new films from Pixar Animation Studios, four from Walt Disney Animation Studios, and the first four in a series of direct-to-DVD films featuring Disney Fairies from DisneyToon Studios. Starting later this year with the release of Disney's "Bolt," all Disney and Pixar animated features will be presented in state-of-the-art Disney Digital 3-D(TM). Additionally, newly converted 3-D versions of the beloved classics, "Toy Story" and "Toy Story 2," are set to debut in 2009 and 2010 respectively.

Among the upcoming animated films on the 2008 release schedule are "WALL*E" (Pixar) from Academy Award(R)-winning director/writer Andrew Stanton ("Finding Nemo") opening nationwide June 27th; "Bolt" (Disney) from the talented new directing team of Chris Williams and Byron Howard, due in theatres on November 26th; and the Disney DVD and Blu-ray release of "Tinker Bell," the first in a new franchise of original entertainment set in the world of Fairies, on October 28th. The Studio's 2009 animated slate includes the summer release of Pixar's first 3-D feature, "Up," from director Pete Docter ("Monsters, Inc.") and co-director Bob Peterson, the Christmas Day release of Disney's original animated fairy tale "The Princess and the Frog" from acclaimed veteran Disney directors John Musker and Ron Clements ("The Little Mermaid," "Aladdin," "Hercules,") and the Disney DVD and Blu-ray release of "Tinker Bell North of Never Land" (working title). 2010 brings the highly anticipated return of Buzz and Woody in the Disney Digital(TM) 3D summer release of Pixar's "Toy Story 3" directed by Lee Unkrich ("Finding Nemo," "Monsters, Inc."); followed by the Christmas arrival of Disney's version of the classic fairy tale, "Rapunzel," featuring the directing debuts of animation legend Glen Keane and directing partner Dean Wellins, and the Disney DVD and Blu-ray release of "Tinker Bell A Midsummer Storm" (working title).

In the summer of 2011, Pixar's "newt" marks the directing debut of multiple Oscar(R)-winning sound designer Gary Rydstrom. Christmas 2011 brings Pixar's first fairy tale, "The Bear and the Bow," from acclaimed filmmaker/writer Brenda Chapman ("The Prince of Egypt"). The Disney DVD and Blu-ray release of "Tinker Bell A Winter Story" (working title) also debuts in 2011. The year 2012 will mark the return of Lightning McQueen, Mater the tow truck, and an international cast of favorite and new car characters in Pixar's "Cars 2," directed by Brad Lewis (producer of "Ratatouille"). Scheduled for Christmas 2012 from Walt Disney Animation Studios is "King of the Elves," an adaptation of a Philip K. Dick short story, directed by Aaron Blaise and Robert Walker ("Brother Bear").

Commenting on the announcement, Cook said, "We couldn't be more proud and excited about our upcoming line-up of feature projects. With so many great films literally on the drawing boards and computer screens, we felt that now was the perfect time to give moviegoers all over the world an update on the state of our art. In a year when our Studio is marking the 80th anniversary of Mickey Mouse, the character that started it all for us, it seems especially timely to share our plans for the future of animation. With John Lasseter and Ed Catmull guiding our creative efforts both at Emeryville and in Burbank, this is as exciting a time as any in our history."

Lasseter added, "This is an amazing time for animation at Disney and Pixar, and it's a thrill to be working on such a diverse and original group of films with such an all-star team of filmmakers. The thing I love best about my job is that I get to work at both Disney and Pixar with filmmakers who are passionate about their projects and who are the absolute best in the business. We're excited to be pushing the boundaries of 3-D and computer technology to tell our stories in the best possible way. At the same time, we're drawing on our past to emphasize memorable characters, original edge-of-your-seat stories, and believable worlds. Walt Disney and his creative team taught us how to blend comedy, powerful emotion, and action-filled excitement in our films, and this group of incredible filmmakers is bringing their own originality and sensibilities to the
process."

WALT DISNEY ANIMATION STUDIOS/ PIXAR ANIMATION STUDIOS RELEASE SCHEDULE
2008 -- 2012:

2008:

WALL*E (Domestic Release Date: June 27th, 2008)
Pixar Animation Studios
Director/Screenwriter: Andrew Stanton
Producer: Jim Morris
Co-Producer: Lindsey Collins
Sound and Character Voice Designer: Ben Burtt
Composer: Thomas Newman, with an Original Song Performed by Peter Gabriel Voice Talent: Fred Willard, Jeff Garlin, Sigourney Weaver, John
Ratzenberger, Kathy Najimy

What if mankind had to leave Earth and somebody forgot to turn off the
last robot?

Academy Award(R)-winning writer-director Andrew Stanton ("Finding
Nemo") and the inventive storytellers and technical geniuses at Pixar
Animation Studios transport moviegoers to a galaxy not so very far away for
a new computer-animated cosmic comedy about a determined robot named
WALL*E.

After hundreds of lonely years doing what he was built for, WALL*E
(short for Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-Class) discovers a new
purpose in life (besides collecting knick-knacks) when he meets a sleek
search robot named EVE. EVE comes to realize that WALL*E has inadvertently
stumbled upon the key to the planet's future, and races back to space to
report her findings to the humans (who have been eagerly awaiting word that
it is safe to return home). Meanwhile, WALL*E chases EVE across the galaxy
and sets into motion one of the most incredible comedy adventures ever
brought to the big screen.

Joining WALL*E on his fantastic journey across a universe of
never-before-imagined visions of the future is a hilarious cast of
characters including a pet cockroach, and a heroic team of malfunctioning
misfit robots.



BOLT (Domestic Release Date: November 26th, 2008, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Chris Williams, Byron Howard
Producer: Clark Spencer
Voice Talent: John Travolta, Miley Cyrus, Susie Essman
For super-dog Bolt (voiced by John Travolta), every day is filled with
adventure, danger and intrigue -- at least until the cameras stop rolling.
When the canine star of a hit TV show is accidentally shipped from his
Hollywood soundstage to New York City, he begins his biggest adventure yet
-- a cross-country journey through the real world. Armed only with the
delusions that all his amazing feats and powers are real, and with the help
of two unlikely traveling companions -- a jaded, abandoned housecat named
Mittens (voiced by Susie Essman), and TV-obsessed hamster in a plastic ball
named Rhino -- Bolt discovers he doesn't need superpowers to be a hero.
Miley Cyrus ("Hannah Montana") brings her vocal talents to the role of
Penny, Bolt's human co-star on the television series.



TINKER BELL (Disney DVD and Blu-ray Release Date: October 28th, 2008)
DisneyToon Studios
Director: Bradley Raymond
Producer: Jeannine Roussel
Enter the magical world of fairies and meet the enchanting creatures of
Pixie Hollow, who "nurture nature" and bring about the change of the
seasons. Changing the colors of the leaves, moving a sunbeam to melt snow,
waking animals from their winter slumber, or giving a patch of sproutlings
a sprinkle of water are all within the realm of these seasonal specialists.
Tinker Bell thinks her fairy talent as a "tinker" isn't as special or
important as the other fairies' talents. But when Tink tries to change who
she is, she creates nothing but disaster! With encouragement from her
friends Rosetta, Silvermist, Fawn and Iridessa, Tink learns the key to
solving her problems lies in her unique tinker abilities ... and discovers
that when she's true to herself, magical things can happen.



2009:

UP (Domestic Release Date: May 29th, 2009, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Pete Docter
Co-Director: Bob Peterson
Producer: Jonas Rivera
Writer: Bob Peterson Voice Talent: Ed Asner, Christopher Plummer, John Ratzenberger, Jordan
Nagai

From the Academy Award(R)-nominated team of director Pete Docter
("Monsters, Inc.") and co-director Bob Peterson comes "Up," a comedic
adventure taking off (and lifting spirits) in summer 2009. Carl Fredricksen
spent his entire life dreaming of exploring the globe and experiencing life
to its fullest. But at age 78, life seems to have passed him by, until a
twist of fate (and a persistent 8-year old Wilderness Explorer named
Russell) gives him a new lease on life. "Up" takes audiences on a thrilling
journey where the unlikely pair encounter wild terrain, unexpected villains
and jungle creatures. When seeking adventure next summer -- look "Up."



TOY STORY in 3-D (Domestic Release Date: October 2nd, 2009)
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: John Lasseter
Producers: Ralph Guggenheim, Bonnie Arnold
Composer: Randy Newman Voice Talent: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles, Jim Varney, Wallace
Shawn, John Ratzenberger

Originally released by Walt Disney Pictures in 1995, "Toy Story" was
the first feature film from Pixar Animation Studios and director John
Lasseter. The film went on to receive Oscar(R) nominations for Best
Original Score, Best Original Song, and Best Original Screenplay, and
earned Lasseter a Special Achievement Award (Oscar(R)) "for the development
and inspired application of techniques that have made possible the first
feature-length computer-animated film." The 3-D version of this landmark
film is being personally overseen by Lasseter with his acclaimed team of
technical wizards handling all the necessary steps in the conversion
process.



THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2009)
Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: John Musker, Ron Clements
Producer: Peter Del Vecho
Composer: Randy Newman
Voice Talent: Anika Noni Rose, Keith David, Jenifer Lewis, John Goodman
A musical set in the greatest city of them all, New Orleans, "The
Princess and the Frog" marks Disney's return to the timeless art form of
traditional animation. The film teams Ron Clements and John Musker,
creators of "The Little Mermaid" and "Aladdin," with Oscar(R)-winning
composer Randy Newman to tell the most beautiful love story ever told ...
with frogs, voodoo, and a singing alligator.

TINKER BELL NORTH OF NEVER LAND - working title (Disney DVD and Blu-ray
Release Date: 2009)


DisneyToon Studios
Director: Klay Hall
Producer: Sean Lurie
In autumn, Tinker Bell is entrusted with crafting a great treasure that
can rejuvenate the Pixie Dust Tree. But when her friend Terence offers to
help, Tink's temper and stubbornness get the better of her, shattering both
her creation and her friendship with Terence. To set things right again,
she must embark on a journey far North of Never Land ... and along the way,
she will discover an even greater treasure.



2010:

TOY STORY 2 in 3-D (Domestic Release Date: February 12th, 2010)
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: John Lasseter
Co-Directors: Lee Unkrich, Ash Brannon
Producers: Helene Plotkin, Karen Robert Jackson
Composer: Randy Newman Voice Talent: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Kelsey Grammer, Don
Rickles, Estelle Harris, Jim Varney, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger

Originally released in 1999, "Toy Story 2" went on to become one of the
most popular animated features of all time. The film picks up as Andy is
heading off to Cowboy Camp and the toys are left to their own devices. When
an obsessive toy collector named Al McWhiggin (owner of Al's Toy Barn)
kidnaps Woody, and Woody learns that he's a highly valued collectable from
a 1950s TV show called "Woody's Roundup," the stage is set for a daring
rescue attempt by the gang from Andy's room. The film introduced such other
memorable characters from "Woody's Roundup" as Jessie the cowgirl, Bullseye
the horse, and the Prospector.

TOY STORY 3 (Domestic Release Date: June 18th, 2010, Disney Digital
3-D(TM))


Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Lee Unkrich
Producer: Darla K. Anderson
Writer: Michael Arndt
Composer: Randy Newman Voice Talent: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Don Rickles, Wallace
Shawn, Estelle Harris, John Ratzenberger, Ned Beatty

The creators of the beloved "Toy Story" films re-open the toy box and
bring moviegoers back to the delightful world of Woody, Buzz and our
favorite gang of toy characters in "Toy Story 3." Lee Unkrich (co-director
of "Toy Story 2" and "Finding Nemo") directs this highly anticipated film,
and Michael Arndt, the Academy Award(R)-winning screenwriter of "Little
Miss Sunshine," brings his unique talents and comedic sensibilities to the
proceedings.



RAPUNZEL (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2010, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Glen Keane, Dean Wellins
Producer: Roy Conli
In this new telling of the classic fairy tale, "Rapunzel," audiences
will be transported to a stunning CG fantasy world complete with the iconic
tower, an evil witch, a gallant hero and, of course, the mysterious girl
with the long golden tresses. Expect adventure, heart, humor, and hair ...
lots of hair, when Rapunzel unleashes her locks in theaters for the 2010
holiday.

TINKER BELL A MIDSUMMER STORM - working title (Disney DVD and Blu-ray
Release Date: 2010)


DisneyToon Studios
Director: Carolyn Gair
Producer: Margot Pipkin
After being confronted by her antagonist Vidia, an irritated Tinker
Bell retaliates by taking a photograph of Vidia ... without considering the
consequences. Now, the two must set aside their differences and cooperate
to prevent evidence of the existence of fairies from falling into human
hands.



2011:

NEWT (Domestic Release Date: Summer 2011, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Gary Rydstrom
Producer: Richard Hollander
Writers: Gary Rydstrom, Leslie Caveny
What happens when the last remaining male and female blue-footed newts
on the planet are forced together by science to save the species, and they
can't stand each other? That's the problem facing Newt and Brooke, heroes
of "newt," the Pixar film by seven-time Academy Award(R) winner for sound
Gary Rydstrom, and director of Pixar's Oscar-nominated short, "Lifted."
Newt and Brooke embark on a perilous, unpredictable adventure and discover
that finding a mate never goes as planned, even when you only have one
choice. Love, it turns out, is not a science.

THE BEAR AND THE BOW (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2011, Disney
Digital 3-D(TM))


Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Brenda Chapman
Producer: Katherine Sarafian
Voice Talent: Reese Witherspoon, Billy Connolly, Emma Thompson
A rugged and mythic Scotland is the setting for Pixar's
action-adventure "The Bear and the Bow." The impetuous, tangle-haired
Merida, though a daughter of royalty, would prefer to make her mark as a
great archer. A clash of wills with her mother compels Merida to make a
reckless choice, which unleashes unintended peril on her father's kingdom
and her mother's life. Merida struggles with the unpredictable forces of
nature, magic and a dark, ancient curse to set things right. Director
Brenda Chapman ("The Prince of Egypt," "The Lion King") and the
storytelling wizards of Pixar conjure humor, fantasy and excitement in this
rich Highland tale.

TINKER BELL A WINTER STORY - working title (Disney DVD and Blu-ray
Release Date: 2011)

DisneyToon Studios

Producer: Sean Lurie

The fourth, as-yet-untold story of Tinker Bell and her fairy friends
will take place in winter, completing the cycle of the seasons.



2012:

CARS 2 (Domestic Release Date: Summer 2012, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Brad Lewis
All the world's a racetrack as racing superstar Lightning McQueen zooms
back into action, with his best friend Mater in tow, to take on the globe's
fastest and finest in this thrilling high-octane new installment of the
"Cars" saga. Mater and McQueen will need their passports as they find
themselves in a new world of intrigue, thrills and fast-paced comedic
escapades around the globe. "Cars 2" is being directed by Brad Lewis,
producer of the Oscar(R)- winning film "Ratatouille."

KING OF THE ELVES (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2012, Disney
Digital 3-D(TM))


Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Aaron Blaise, Robert Walker
Producer: Chuck Williams
Legendary storyteller Phillip K. Dick's short story (his only
experiment in the fantasy genre) becomes the basis for this fantastic and
imaginative tale about an average man living in the Mississippi Delta,
whose reluctant actions to help a desperate band of elves leads them to
name him their new king. Joining the innocent and endangered elves as they
attempt to escape from an evil and menacing troll, their unlikely new
leader finds himself caught on a journey filled with unimaginable dangers
and a chance to bring real meaning back to his own life.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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