Author Topic: References in Kill Bill  (Read 25717 times)

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Raikus

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References in Kill Bill
« Reply #75 on: April 26, 2004, 04:47:18 PM »
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Quote from: kelvin
At the end of vol. 2, in the daughter's room, you see a toy figure of a horse beside the bed on a small table. I noticed that I still have EXACTLY the same horse from my childhood days. I just wondered if there is anything special about it.

My wife has about a hundred of them in her parent's attic. There supposed to be worth a bit of cash for collectors. I think they're called "Breyer's" but I could be mistaken.
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free, silhouetted by the sea, circled by the circus sands, with all memory and fate driven deep beneath the waves, let me forget about today until tomorrow.

pete

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References in Kill Bill
« Reply #76 on: April 26, 2004, 06:41:13 PM »
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there's a part in the house of blue leaves in the first one when Gordon Liu's Johnny Mo flies up onto the second floor, Gordon Liu has flown up to a very similarly-structured restaurant in another Yuen WoPing-choreographed film, Deadly China Hero.
“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
- Buster Keaton

LostEraser

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References in Kill Bill
« Reply #77 on: May 09, 2004, 03:57:28 PM »
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Can anyone name all the movies Quentin used the Ennio Morricone music from? In both Vol 1 & 2. I'm lazy and I don't feel like looking them up right now. lol!
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

Pubrick

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« Reply #78 on: May 10, 2004, 12:33:43 AM »
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then look them up urself when u DO feel like it. u obviously don't care that much if u can't be bothered.

laugh out loud.
under the paving stones.

LostEraser

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References in Kill Bill
« Reply #79 on: May 10, 2004, 03:17:47 AM »
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Quote from: Pubrick
then look them up urself when u DO feel like it. u obviously don't care that much if u can't be bothered.

laugh out loud.


LMAO! Good point. Though I'm one step ahead of you, I've already looked 'em all up. I just thought I'd see if anyone else did it first.  :wink:  :P
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

cine

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« Reply #80 on: May 10, 2004, 08:11:54 AM »
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Quote from: LostEraser
LMAO! Good point. Though I'm one step ahead of you, I've already looked 'em all up. I just thought I'd see if anyone else did it first.  :wink:  :P

Boy, you sure fooled everyone, didn't you?

..laughing my ass off.

LostEraser

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« Reply #81 on: May 10, 2004, 09:08:21 PM »
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Quote from: Cinephile
Quote from: LostEraser
LMAO! Good point. Though I'm one step ahead of you, I've already looked 'em all up. I just thought I'd see if anyone else did it first.  :wink:  :P

Boy, you sure fooled everyone, didn't you?

..laughing my ass off.


 :?: Hey I wasn't trying to fool anyone. Just thought I'd see if anyone had looked it up before me.  :)

Sorry you felt fooled there.  :wink:  :P
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

MacGuffin

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« Reply #82 on: May 10, 2004, 09:16:02 PM »
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Rolling On The Floor Laughing My ass Off
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Bethie

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« Reply #83 on: May 11, 2004, 01:02:26 AM »
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Quote from: Pubrick
then look them up urself when u DO feel like it. u obviously don't care that much if u can't be bothered.

laugh out loud.



That turned me on.
who likes movies anyway

MacGuffin

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« Reply #84 on: May 23, 2005, 01:12:43 PM »
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The Horror Geek Speaks: Thriller: A Cruel Picture
One of the many films that served as an inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Source: IGN.FilmForce
 


To be totally honest, the main reason people will see Bo Arne Vibenius' 1974 film, Thriller: A Cruel Picture is because it was one the numerous inspirations for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Christina Lindberg's character One Eye is the clear inspiration for Darryl Hannah's Elle Driver. It's unfortunate that this is the only reason people will see Thriller, because, truth be told, it's a really great little exploitation film.

Lindberg is One Eye, a mute young woman who hasn't spoken a word since being raped in a park by a pedophile as a young girl. She lives on a farm with her parents and things seem to be pretty good – until she meets up with a slick-talking pimp who kidnaps her, hooks her on heroine, and turns her out. One Eye's life changes dramatically: she has an eye cut out for disobedience, her parents (who think she left because she hated them – another of the pimp's cruel machinations) kill themselves, and the young woman is forced to fulfill any and every kind of sexual perversion imaginable. This is a movie that definitely lives up to its A Cruel Picture subtitle.

However, since One Eye is hopelessly hooked on heroin (which the pimp doles out to her daily as long as she behaves), she has a certain amount of freedom on her day off. She can actually wander the city since she's sure to be back in time for her next fix. One Eye uses this time to learn how to shoot, drive a car, and kick ass in hand to hand combat. Once she's acquired these skills, it's time for payback – the ruthless and bloody kind.

One astute observer of the film remarked that Thriller was more "Michael Haneke and Sam Peckinpah than Jess Franco." This is a great way of describing the film. It definitely falls well into the realm of sleazy exploitation cinema, but there's an art to the presentation that's missing in a lot of the more base films of the genre. I'd not only mention Haneke and Peckinpah, but also Abel Ferrara as there are a number of striking similarities between this film and Ferrara's seminal Ms. .45. A mute heroine who's been raped is pushed to revenge and becomes a goddess reborn in both films – yet each stands as a unique piece of cinema in its own right.

Lindberg is right up there with Zoe Tamerlis as far as lead actresses go. Both play the mute victim role with a surprising amount of depth and nuance. Lindberg's performance is far better than Hannah's spoofing of the role in Tarantino's film as well. This is yet another example of the problems I have with Tarantino's handling of that particular film – if he genuinely loves these movies like Thriller, then why borrow elements from them and treat them as cheap jokes? Elle Driver is a poor caricature of One Eye – and if Tarantino wanted to pay homage to the character, he could have done so in a more serious fashion.

The film itself is a heady mix of sex and violence, complete with numerous hardcore insert shots. If pornographic sex bothers you, there are a few parts of this film you'll want to skip. Yet, in this regard, it's more like Baise Moi than Tinto Brass' Caligula – Caligula used sex like a typical porn film, while Thriller and Baise Moi use it as a story element that exists in the film because it's an organic outgrowth of the plot. In this regard, it's still exploitative, but it does serve at least something of a higher purpose.

The violence is pretty tame overall – Vibenius loves to shoot each murder in slow motion, which is sort of cool at first, but tends to drag things out as the film progresses. There are lots of exploding blood squibs, but not much else in terms of gore – the film's one decapitation is kept entirely offscreen, implied more through sound than any sort of visual.

Speaking of the sound, the film has one of the oddest, most jarring soundtracks I've come across – and it complements the film perfectly. Again, you can sort of see its influence in the music Tarantino chose for Kill Bill.

In the end, Thriller wasn't the first film to be banned in Sweden – but it was the first homegrown film to be banned there. It's hard to imagine it inspiring that sort of reaction today since it's almost quaint in comparison to some of the other films out there. Even the sex is your garden variety porn – not anything resembling legitimate rape or things of that nature. Yet, it's still a mean little film – and one worth checking out if you're at all interested in cult exploitation cinema or if you're just curious about some Quentin Tarantino's cinematic influences.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Reinhold

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« Reply #85 on: June 10, 2005, 08:38:55 PM »
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Quote from: Duck Sauce
Quote from: coffeebeetle
Yesssss.....I was waiting for the dashed/animated square...I heard a couple of chuckles from the audience too, so that was great.


I laughed out loud, everybody looked at me.


me too.
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

ElPandaRoyal

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« Reply #86 on: June 20, 2005, 12:15:43 PM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
The Horror Geek Speaks: Thriller: A Cruel Picture
One of the many films that served as an inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Source: IGN.FilmForce
 


To be totally honest, the main reason people will see Bo Arne Vibenius' 1974 film, Thriller: A Cruel Picture is because it was one the numerous inspirations for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Christina Lindberg's character One Eye is the clear inspiration for Darryl Hannah's Elle Driver. It's unfortunate that this is the only reason people will see Thriller, because, truth be told, it's a really great little exploitation film.

Lindberg is One Eye, a mute young woman who hasn't spoken a word since being raped in a park by a pedophile as a young girl. She lives on a farm with her parents and things seem to be pretty good – until she meets up with a slick-talking pimp who kidnaps her, hooks her on heroine, and turns her out. One Eye's life changes dramatically: she has an eye cut out for disobedience, her parents (who think she left because she hated them – another of the pimp's cruel machinations) kill themselves, and the young woman is forced to fulfill any and every kind of sexual perversion imaginable. This is a movie that definitely lives up to its A Cruel Picture subtitle.

However, since One Eye is hopelessly hooked on heroin (which the pimp doles out to her daily as long as she behaves), she has a certain amount of freedom on her day off. She can actually wander the city since she's sure to be back in time for her next fix. One Eye uses this time to learn how to shoot, drive a car, and kick ass in hand to hand combat. Once she's acquired these skills, it's time for payback – the ruthless and bloody kind.

One astute observer of the film remarked that Thriller was more "Michael Haneke and Sam Peckinpah than Jess Franco." This is a great way of describing the film. It definitely falls well into the realm of sleazy exploitation cinema, but there's an art to the presentation that's missing in a lot of the more base films of the genre. I'd not only mention Haneke and Peckinpah, but also Abel Ferrara as there are a number of striking similarities between this film and Ferrara's seminal Ms. .45. A mute heroine who's been raped is pushed to revenge and becomes a goddess reborn in both films – yet each stands as a unique piece of cinema in its own right.

Lindberg is right up there with Zoe Tamerlis as far as lead actresses go. Both play the mute victim role with a surprising amount of depth and nuance. Lindberg's performance is far better than Hannah's spoofing of the role in Tarantino's film as well. This is yet another example of the problems I have with Tarantino's handling of that particular film – if he genuinely loves these movies like Thriller, then why borrow elements from them and treat them as cheap jokes? Elle Driver is a poor caricature of One Eye – and if Tarantino wanted to pay homage to the character, he could have done so in a more serious fashion.

The film itself is a heady mix of sex and violence, complete with numerous hardcore insert shots. If pornographic sex bothers you, there are a few parts of this film you'll want to skip. Yet, in this regard, it's more like Baise Moi than Tinto Brass' Caligula – Caligula used sex like a typical porn film, while Thriller and Baise Moi use it as a story element that exists in the film because it's an organic outgrowth of the plot. In this regard, it's still exploitative, but it does serve at least something of a higher purpose.

The violence is pretty tame overall – Vibenius loves to shoot each murder in slow motion, which is sort of cool at first, but tends to drag things out as the film progresses. There are lots of exploding blood squibs, but not much else in terms of gore – the film's one decapitation is kept entirely offscreen, implied more through sound than any sort of visual.

Speaking of the sound, the film has one of the oddest, most jarring soundtracks I've come across – and it complements the film perfectly. Again, you can sort of see its influence in the music Tarantino chose for Kill Bill.

In the end, Thriller wasn't the first film to be banned in Sweden – but it was the first homegrown film to be banned there. It's hard to imagine it inspiring that sort of reaction today since it's almost quaint in comparison to some of the other films out there. Even the sex is your garden variety porn – not anything resembling legitimate rape or things of that nature. Yet, it's still a mean little film – and one worth checking out if you're at all interested in cult exploitation cinema or if you're just curious about some Quentin Tarantino's cinematic influences.


Damn, I'd love to see this movie right now. It sounds like one hell of a brutal ride.
Si

Reinhold

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Re: References in Kill Bill
« Reply #87 on: April 11, 2006, 11:17:12 PM »
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the notes that start the "verses" in Twisted Nerve are similar to the tones in the party scene in Midnight Cowboy.
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

hedwig

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Re: References in Kill Bill
« Reply #88 on: April 11, 2006, 11:37:12 PM »
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the notes that start the "verses" in Twisted nerve are similar to the tones in the party scene in Midnight Cowboy.
WHOA WHOA WHOA, SPOILERS.


another reference:
-the coffee pot that appears in the Vivica A. Fox fight scene is the same coffee pot that Judge Reinhold used to splash coffee on the face of the convenience store robber in Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

I Don't Believe in Beatles

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Re: References in Kill Bill
« Reply #89 on: April 11, 2006, 11:54:15 PM »
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And the "Kill" in the title is a reference to this movie:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063186/
"A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what's behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later." --Stanley Kubrick

 

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