Author Topic: Tarantino and Godard  (Read 8552 times)

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luctruff

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Tarantino and Godard
« on: October 10, 2003, 04:41:15 AM »
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so do you guys see any comparisons between the two?  I could include some of Altman as well.  But do you think Tarantino and Godard are on the same page or complete opposites.  I can't decide.  But I find myself linking the two together.  
I enjoy Godard more than tarantino.  they both show their love for films.  but godard destroys the fourth wall (or whatever it's called) and tarntino loves to show his admiration of certain film genres.  so they are different in that godard laughs at the process of films and the reality and fantasy of it all, while tarantino enjoys the fact that he's making something that is pure fantasy.  The thing that links them together, i think, is a need to add their twist on films of the past, but not quite make it a spoof.
not a completely realized idea, as it just came to me, but maybe someone can add something to this...
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Cecil

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2003, 06:50:04 AM »
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i see the link. tarantino talks about godard on the reservoirs dogs 10th anniversary dvd

eward

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2003, 07:48:12 AM »
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he says godard was just a phase

SoNowThen

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2003, 08:53:55 AM »
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the correct thread title is: Tarantino and Melville


but yeah, I think QT likes to borrow ideas from JLG, too. but hey, what self-respecting director doesn't?
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

luctruff

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2003, 02:35:08 PM »
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Quote from: SoNowThen
the correct thread title is: Tarantino and Melville


I don't know much about Melville.  Are they alike at all?
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Teen Wolf

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2003, 06:36:19 PM »
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Stylistically I don't see any similarities. I think the early Godard is similar to Tarantino insofar as their exuberance and love of movies is concerned. They both love cheap American gangster films...

godardian

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Re: Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2003, 08:21:50 PM »
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Quote from: luctruff
so do you guys see any comparisons between the two?  I could include some of Altman as well.  But do you think Tarantino and Godard are on the same page or complete opposites.  I can't decide.  But I find myself linking the two together.  
I enjoy Godard more than tarantino.  they both show their love for films.  but godard destroys the fourth wall (or whatever it's called) and tarntino loves to show his admiration of certain film genres.  so they are different in that godard laughs at the process of films and the reality and fantasy of it all, while tarantino enjoys the fact that he's making something that is pure fantasy.  The thing that links them together, i think, is a need to add their twist on films of the past, but not quite make it a spoof.
not a completely realized idea, as it just came to me, but maybe someone can add something to this...


They use similar techniques, but to very, very different ends. Godard is so much more cerebral than Tarantino, and Tarantino is so much more visceral than Godard, that even though a comparison seems apt because of their freedom and irreverence when it comes to genres/styles, I don't see much meaningful similarity between the two.

If I had to pick one, I would choose Godard with total certainty.
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Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

tpfkabi

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2003, 02:13:22 PM »
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i was thinking this the other day.
they both had studied films religiously before even making one, so they both already knew the in's and out's of film making.
with this knowledge they both do/did things "you're not supposed to do" in filmmaking.
Godard was definitely more extreme in this practice
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Cecil

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2003, 10:17:35 PM »
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my film teacher once said "ah yes, tarantino. its like... godard made fun"

just to make it clear, he loves godard. hes one of his top 3 favorite filmmakers

NEON MERCURY

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Re: Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2003, 10:24:44 PM »
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Quote from: luctruff
so do you guys see any comparisons between the two?  


::does his best roadruner impression sprinkled w/ a little gilbert godfrey and a dash of moxie::

-"ummm...ummm...A-HA! they are both film-makers "


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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2003, 11:11:05 PM »
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I think Godard's earlier films and Tarantino match up well.
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soixante

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2003, 01:21:38 PM »
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In Band of Outsiders, the characters break into an impromptu dance routine at a cafe, and perhaps that influenced Tarantino to stage the Travolta-Uma dance at Jack Rabbit Slim's.

Tarantino stages scenes in Pulp Fictino and NBK with characters having long conversations in corridors, which reminds me of Godard, especially Alphaville.

Tarantino was inspired by 70's exploitation movies the way Godard was inspired by American B-movies of the 40's.
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SoNowThen

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2003, 01:44:04 PM »
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Quote from: soixante
In Band of Outsiders, the characters break into an impromptu dance routine at a cafe, and perhaps that influenced Tarantino to stage the Travolta-Uma dance at Jack Rabbit Slim's.

Tarantino stages scenes in Pulp Fictino and NBK with characters having long conversations in corridors, which reminds me of Godard, especially Alphaville.

Tarantino was inspired by 70's exploitation movies the way Godard was inspired by American B-movies of the 40's.


adding to the first point: I believe QT had Uma mimmick some of Anna Karina's dance moves from My Life To Live as well...
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

godardian

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2003, 02:47:54 PM »
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Quote from: SoNowThen
Quote from: soixante
In Band of Outsiders, the characters break into an impromptu dance routine at a cafe, and perhaps that influenced Tarantino to stage the Travolta-Uma dance at Jack Rabbit Slim's.

Tarantino stages scenes in Pulp Fictino and NBK with characters having long conversations in corridors, which reminds me of Godard, especially Alphaville.

Tarantino was inspired by 70's exploitation movies the way Godard was inspired by American B-movies of the 40's.


adding to the first point: I believe QT had Uma mimmick some of Anna Karina's dance moves from My Life To Live as well...


Not to mention hairstyle/"look."

Still, all peripheral likenesses. Very, very different purposes; very different inspiration/motivation to be a filmmaker, I would think. Godard made film essays; Tarantino makes film bull-sessions.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

prophet

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Tarantino and Godard
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2003, 03:06:23 PM »
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limp dick limp work?
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