Author Topic: Kill Bill: Volume Two  (Read 84444 times)

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Pubrick

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #240 on: March 14, 2004, 01:19:36 AM »
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Quote from: El Scorchoz
from the aint it cool review "If you were turned off by the gore of the first film and found yourself wanting more of the ‘verbal” Tarantino dialogue… well, this is the film for you."

what do you guys think about this?

it's all i ever wanted. and more.

i wasn't turned off by the gore. i don't think anyone can be these days. the dialogue was the only turn off, it wasn't memorable at all.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

eward

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« Reply #241 on: March 14, 2004, 11:53:08 AM »
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i mostly agree about the dialogue stuff, but i did find a few peices of dialogue quite memorable (not comparable to QT's other work, but amusing nonetheless) like bill's opening monologue, sonny chiba's dialogue as he gives uma the hanzo sword (don't know how much was lifted from other films tho) or lucy liu's little monologue after she cut off boss tanaka's head.  otherwise - yeah, it was pretty dry.

brockly

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #242 on: March 14, 2004, 08:47:48 PM »
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don't forget GoGo's penetration speach.

ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #243 on: March 14, 2004, 09:03:07 PM »
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I'm digging the avatar, Mr. Landers.
"As a matter of fact I only work with the feeling of something magical, something seemingly significant. And to keep it magical I don't want to know the story involved, I just want the hypnotic effect of it somehow seeming significant without knowing why." - Len Lye

brockly

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #244 on: March 15, 2004, 05:07:56 AM »
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thanks, and call me Brock

official MPAA rating for vol. 2: R for violence, language and brief drug use. no "stronge bloody violence" this time round.

MacGuffin

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #245 on: March 16, 2004, 10:59:50 AM »
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Carradine finds renewal in ‘Kill Bill’
‘Kung Fu’ star hopes for Travolta-like rebirth



LOS ANGELES (AP) - Globe-trotting hit man Bill may be ready to meet a bloody end, but kung fu hero Caine lives on.
 
David Carradine, riding a career resurgence as the title character in Quentin Tarantino’s two-part saga “Kill Bill,” is revisiting his martial-arts roots with Tuesday’s DVD release of season one of “Kung Fu,” his 1970s television series.

The two characters could scarcely be more different — Bill the worldly father figure of a pack of crack assassins, and Kwai Chang Caine the soft-spoken refugee from a Shaolin monastery, serenely spreading wisdom and kicking bad guys’ butts in the Old West.

Through more than 100 feature films with such directors as Martin Scorsese, Ingmar Bergman and Hal Ashby, Carradine remains best known as Caine. He reprised the role in a mid-1980s TV movie and played Caine’s grandson in the 1990s syndicated series “Kung Fu: The Legend Continues,” but most of Carradine’s work the last 20 years has been on obscure, low-budget movies.

Carradine, 67, hopes “Kill Bill” will reopen doors in Hollywood the way Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” did for John Travolta and “Jackie Brown” did to a lesser extent for Pam Grier.

“All I’ve ever needed since I more or less retired from studio films a couple of decades ago ... is just to be in one,” Carradine said in an interview at his home in Tarzana, in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley.
 
“There isn’t anything that Anthony Hopkins or Clint Eastwood or Sean Connery or any of those old guys are doing that I couldn’t do,” he said. “All that was ever required was somebody with Quentin’s courage to take and put me in the spotlight.”

Carradine was a shadowy presence in last fall’s “Kill Bill — Vol. 1,” in which one of Bill’s former assassins (Uma Thurman) begins a vengeful rampage against her old associates.

The first film hits home video in mid-April just before the theatrical debut of “Kill Bill — Vol. 2,” in which Thurman’s character comes face to face again with Bill himself. The title implies Bill’s fate, but Carradine is mum on whether the character meets his demise.

Bill a killer, but no villain

Though he’s the heavy, Bill has more depth than run-of-the-mill bad guys, Carradine said.

“Bill is more fun than anything,” Carradine said. “Bill has virtually no human problems. He’s just kind of put himself above it all. He’s actually a very charming guy. Yeah, he kills people for a living, but ... As far as him being a villain, there are no good guys in a Quentin Tarantino movie. Everybody has an agenda, everybody is a criminal, and everybody has a certain nobility.”

The son of character actor John Carradine and brother of actors Keith and Robert, Carradine had the title role in the short-lived Western TV series “Shane” in 1966 and co-starred in Scorsese’s 1972 film “Boxcar Bertha” before shooting to stardom with “Kung Fu.”

He left after three seasons, saying the show had started to repeat itself. After “Kung Fu,” Carradine starred in the 1975 cult flick “Death Race 2000” and played Woody Guthrie in Ashby’s “Bound for Glory” the following year. He starred with Liv Ullmann in Bergman’s “The Serpent’s Egg” in 1977 and with his brothers in the 1980 Western “The Long Riders.”

Despite Carradine’s well-deserved reputation as a quick-to-anger actor and hard-drinking partier, the public image of the unflappable, inscrutable Caine lingers. Fueling that is Carradine’s own continued interest in Oriental herbs, exercise and philosophy. He wrote a personal memoir called “Spirit of Shaolin” and continues to make instructional videos on tai chi and other martial arts.

Yet the actor said Tarantino’s Bill is closer to the real Carradine than Caine. Tarantino has “written more the guy I really am. The art collector, the musician, the philosopher and the drugstore cowboy.”

Carradine, who said he has not had a drink since 1996, talked candidly about his past boozing and narcotics use, mainly “a lot of psychotropic drugs.”

Now he sticks to coffee and cigarettes, saying he gave up alcohol because “I didn’t like the way I looked for one thing. You’re kind of out of control emotionally when you drink that much. I was quicker to anger.”

Carradine has been married four times and has three grown children. He lives a seemingly placid life with his girlfriend, her four children and a couple of dogs. Questions about his wilder days have grown tiresome, and Carradine said he may just brush them off in the future.

“You’re probably witnessing the last time I will ever answer those questions,” Carradine said. “Because this is a regeneration. It is a renaissance. It is the start of a new career for me.

“It’s time to do nothing but look forward.”
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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modage

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #246 on: March 16, 2004, 11:09:37 AM »
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i still wish it were Warren Beatty though.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

SoNowThen

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #247 on: March 16, 2004, 11:12:32 AM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
Carradine finds renewal in ‘Kill Bill’
‘Kung Fu’ star hopes for Travolta-like rebirth
“There isn’t anything that Anthony Hopkins or Clint Eastwood or Sean Connery or any of those old guys are doing that I couldn’t do,” he said.


"Hi, I'm David Carradine, and I'm insane."
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

©brad

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #248 on: March 16, 2004, 12:48:19 PM »
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so i was at work last night and three different ppl were talking about the trailer they saw for kill bill vol. 2 on TV! and that it was badass. i stood there, stupified, esp. when one of them went "aren't you suppose to know this stuff, you being this big film buff?"

so um, please tell me they're full of shit.

ElPandaRoyal

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« Reply #249 on: March 16, 2004, 12:50:24 PM »
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Yeah, tell him something
Si

MacGuffin

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #250 on: March 20, 2004, 11:50:02 PM »
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Quote from: Brock Landers
check out the new trailer over at killbill.jp. there's no new footage, but it's really strange.


I dunno if you mean this one or not, but here's a large Quicktime version:

http://www.apple.com/jp/quicktime/trailers/gaga/media/kill_bill_large.mov
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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El Duderino

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #251 on: March 21, 2004, 04:26:40 PM »
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i really dont like that trailer. but hey, that's just one guy's opinion
Did I just get cock-blocked by Bob Saget?

MacGuffin

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« Reply #252 on: March 22, 2004, 09:56:37 AM »
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More talking, lots of action in second 'Kill Bill' offering
Source: Los Angeles Daily News

Moviegoers who expect Quentin Tarantino's "Kill Bill -- Vol. 2' to be merely a continuation of "Kill Bill -- Vol. 1' are in for a surprise.

David Carradine, the title star of Tarantino's creation, declares that the second installment is "very different' from the first. "The content, even the style, are very different. It's not the juggernaut of fighting that the first one was, although there's a lot of hot action in it. Everyone talks a lot -- what people are used to with Quentin.'

The story line in Tarantino's paean to chop-socky film fare, you may recall, has Uma Thurman's Bride character seeking revenge on her paid-assassin associates for a hit ordered by the boss, her lover, Bill.

"The heart of the movie is the stuff between me and Uma -- wonderful stuff. I just saw the finished picture, and it's beyond my expectations,' adds Carradine of the feature opening April 16. "The second one is, I think, a better picture than the first.'

Carradine's face will soon be all over the place. A DVD of his original "Kung-Fu' series has just been released, with David looking quite buff on the cover. He also has a set of his martial arts instructional presentations coming out on DVD/home video. He's returning to his role as the mysterious monk -- in jeopardy with Jennifer Garner -- on "Alias.'

"Part of it is serendipity, but a lot of it is people getting on the big bandwagon -- Miramax's bandwagon -- wanting to do things at the same time as 'Kill Bill -- Vol. 2,' ' notes Carradine.

He has weeks ahead of "Kill Bill' promotion in the United States and Australia, "and we haven't even talked about Asia yet. There are three premieres in Europe. We'll be at the Cannes Film Festival, where they're doing a special presentation of Part 1 and Part 2 together. There'll be midnight-show kinds of things with Part 1 and Part 2 here in the States, too -- one at the Cinerama Dome. If you go in April 15 and see the 10 o'clock show and stay in your seat, you can see the midnight show of Part 2.'
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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©brad

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #253 on: March 22, 2004, 12:19:08 PM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
"The heart of the movie is the stuff between me and Uma -- wonderful stuff. I just saw the finished picture, and it's beyond my expectations,' adds Carradine of the feature opening April 16. "The second one is, I think, a better picture than the first.'


ofcourse he would say that.

ElPandaRoyal

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Kill Bill: Volume Two
« Reply #254 on: March 22, 2004, 12:48:32 PM »
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But I bet he's right. (I hope he is...)
Si

 

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