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What are we reading?

edison · 1611 · 177667

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jenkins

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Reply #1605 on: October 20, 2019, 04:25:41 AM


it's like, oh shit. this brings it. just immensely intelligent and having so much literary fun. itís styled after for example Tristram Shandy and Tom Jones. a playful narrative with wild diversions. juicy, deft prose


WorldForgot

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Reply #1606 on: November 19, 2019, 01:56:26 PM
After Didion I read Tropic of Orange by Karen Tei Yamashita and White by Bret Easton Ellis.

Tropic of Orange is an ensemble piece that takes place over the course of a week, but really it's clear which characters are giving the novel its momentum. So I could see how it'd be easy to put this book down when the focus shifts to the sideline. Where it excels is in the "certain realism" that Pasolini championed: you can believe all of this could happen, even when it pushes the boundaries of our reality. Like its lucha match between SUPERNAFTA and EL GRAN MOJADO, or the epidemic of poisonous oranges that threatens all of LA, we're reminded of how strange our personal routines are, how often they've been informed by infrastructure set up decades before us -- and that it could all disintegrate and leave us bare, sifting through modernity for sensations that feel true.

White is part memoir, part essay collection. Drenk and eward have written about it in BEE'z thread. This book is a relief, an escape from the spectrum of extremes that frame our political and cultural discourse. Itself citing Didion, decades of film, and BEE'z battles with addiction, one gets the sense for how sterilized American culture has become -- and that, regrettably, en masse, the zeitgeist cries out for a pacifier or pitchforks, and no nuance in between.


jenkins

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Reply #1607 on: November 19, 2019, 02:19:54 PM
you do recommend Tropic of Orange or you donít?

BEE speaks in generalities that relate to pop culture because he wants to be more famous. Ben Lerner was talking about the state of literature being in a post-Ashbery state, responding to that tremendous voice. basically the zeitgeist has been trash since the 70s and the underground is always fertile


WorldForgot

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Reply #1608 on: November 19, 2019, 02:30:04 PM
In the book he's hyper aware of his own bubble and the bubbles other Americans may be locking their attitudes within -- he frames the 70s in a vein that I found is similar to Once Upon a Time in Hollywood'z, that the country was once "innocent" about how provocative we were allowed to be, in public and through mainstream art, and now it's all policed through mass media news outlets and social media.

Tropic of Orange was lyrical. I recommend anyone looking for an ensemble to piece to at least try it out. If you dont click with its rhythm after two or three character-chapters, it probably won't gel.


jenkins

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Reply #1609 on: November 19, 2019, 02:40:46 PM
lyrical, nice, nice. i feel happy with how the situation went, glad to hear

if one doesnít let oneself become bothered by mainstream in the first place, one doesnít feel bothered by its so-called policing. itís all hot air to me


jenkins

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Reply #1610 on: November 30, 2019, 08:37:38 PM


it's from The Topeka School which i'm back into after letting Lydia Davis sidetrack me