Author Topic: What are we reading?  (Read 111140 times)

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Redlum

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What are we reading?
« Reply #210 on: January 05, 2004, 12:00:43 PM »
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I really enjoyed Franny and Zooey. So much so I read it in one sitting. I didnt quite get what I was hoping from it because as with Catcher I think the characters wealth kind of distances me from them a little(which is why Max Fischer in Rushmore works so well for me).
\"I wanted to make a film for kids, something that would present them with a kind of elementary morality. Because nowadays nobody bothers to tell those kids, \'Hey, this is right and this is wrong\'.\"
  -  George Lucas

Slick Shoes

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What are we reading?
« Reply #211 on: January 07, 2004, 12:31:43 PM »
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About to begin You Shall Know Our Velocity.

molly

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What are we reading?
« Reply #212 on: January 07, 2004, 12:40:26 PM »
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has anyone read Atonement by Ian McEwan?
i started, then left it because i didn't have time. People say it's excellent, a real master work.

ębrad

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« Reply #213 on: January 07, 2004, 02:16:31 PM »
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Quote from: godardian
Quote from: A Matter Of Chance
Quote from: godardian
Quote from: molly
Franzen: Corrections
will they make a movie out of it?


Good show, molly! I LOVED that book. It made me think deeply and cry; two of my favorites.

My recommendation for your next book (if you like it): Jeffrey Eugenides's Middlesex.


I loved The Corrections and Middlesex, I think both are great books.


 :yabbse-thumbup:   :-D  :!:


i read the corrections! it was incredible. however, i remeber having some trouble w/ the ending, and now that i think about it i can't really remember how it ended. read it a while ago, you see.

right now i'm in the middle of

and it's most excellent.

godardian

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What are we reading?
« Reply #214 on: January 07, 2004, 02:21:59 PM »
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Quote from: molly
has anyone read Atonement by Ian McEwan?
i started, then left it because i didn't have time. People say it's excellent, a real master work.


It is very, very good. I'd recommend it.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Pubrick

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What are we reading?
« Reply #215 on: January 08, 2004, 10:57:36 PM »
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by david zane mairowitz & robert crumb
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

eward

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« Reply #216 on: January 08, 2004, 11:30:53 PM »
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Woody Allen on Woody Allen:
In conversation with Stig Bjorkman

godardian

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« Reply #217 on: January 09, 2004, 06:23:58 PM »
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The new Vanity Fair arrived in the mail today.

"How Miramax Remade the Movie Business: Bonus excerpt from Peter Biskind's new book!" (Dare I read the "excerpt" and taint the book? I'm so on edge now!)

"Exlusive Photos: Leonardo DiCaprio as Howard Hughes in Martin Scorsese's The Aviator" What, photos?!?! In Vanity Fair!?! You're kidding me, right? Of course I'll be devouring these, as well.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

classical gas

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What are we reading?
« Reply #218 on: January 10, 2004, 06:27:27 AM »
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i'm reading 'the brothers karmazov' and then i'll start on either 'dude where's my country' or 'the stranger', which i just got in the mail...it was $0.75 on half.com.......

godardian

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« Reply #219 on: January 10, 2004, 10:17:23 AM »
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Quote from: classical gas
i'm reading 'the brothers karmazov' and then i'll start on either 'dude where's my country' or 'the stranger', which i just got in the mail...it was $0.75 on half.com.......


The Stranger is one of my favorite novels. It's such a quick read, yet so unforgettable... Brothers Karamazov also unforgettable, but not such a quick read.  :)
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

cron

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« Reply #220 on: January 10, 2004, 10:21:36 AM »
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yeah, "L'Etranger" is an amazing book.   a MUST (really) for 'The Man who Wasn't There' fans.
context, context, context.

classical gas

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« Reply #221 on: January 11, 2004, 12:58:40 AM »
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Quote from: godardian
Quote from: classical gas
i'm reading 'the brothers karmazov' and then i'll start on either 'dude where's my country' or 'the stranger', which i just got in the mail...it was $0.75 on half.com.......


The Stranger is one of my favorite novels. It's such a quick read, yet so unforgettable... Brothers Karamazov also unforgettable, but not such a quick read.  :)


Yeah, I'm excited about "The Stranger"; but my roommate told me that is was boring.  I can't see such a short book being boring, and one that is admired by so many people and aparently filled with so much thought and emotion.  I only question his opinion because he usually has good taste, but then, maybe it's just boring to some.  I'll find out for myself though.
As for The Brother Karamzov, I've already read half of it before, but it got stolen (who steals a Dostoevsky book??).  I'm starting from page one though to be able to absorb it all over again ( I can't wait to get to the Grand Inquisitor part).  I also recieved "Notes from Underground" in the mail, which was also stolen before I had a chance to read it.

"Atlas Shrugged" was the last 1000+ page book I read and it didn't take me too long, so hopefully "Brothers..." won't either.  Funny too, because as far as I can tell, Rand and Dostoevsky have completely different philosophies, it'll probably cause some conflicting emotions within me...

cron

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« Reply #222 on: January 11, 2004, 05:05:56 PM »
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The Outsider is  not boring.

Does anyone likes Kurt Vonnegut , Jr.?   I've only read Breakfast of Champions and fell in love with it... but it hinted  that his whole technique was a one-trick pony, whatever that may mean.
context, context, context.

godardian

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« Reply #223 on: January 11, 2004, 05:48:48 PM »
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Quote from: classical gas
"Atlas Shrugged" was the last 1000+ page book I read and it didn't take me too long, so hopefully "Brothers..." won't either.  Funny too, because as far as I can tell, Rand and Dostoevsky have completely different philosophies, it'll probably cause some conflicting emotions within me...


Ugh, I hate Rand's philosophies. Did you ever see the Simpsons episode with the Ayn Rand Daycare? All pacifiers snatched from infant's mouths, and signs reading, "Helping is futile"? Funny stuff. I think Atlas Shrugged was even mocked on South Park once. A fascinating, extreme, scary individual, Rand was. Of course, most writers/philosophers are, regardless of how astute they might be... Can you imagine being the only other person sitting at a table with Ayn Rand and, say, Lionel Trilling or Hannah Arendt? Yikes! Get me outta there!
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

A Matter Of Chance

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What are we reading?
« Reply #224 on: January 11, 2004, 07:39:32 PM »
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Quote from: chuckhimselfo
The Outsider is  not boring.

Does anyone likes Kurt Vonnegut , Jr.?   I've only read Breakfast of Champions and fell in love with it... but it hinted  that his whole technique was a one-trick pony, whatever that may mean.


I read Slaughter-House Five and thought it was great.

 

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