Author Topic: What are we reading?  (Read 115853 times)

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MacGuffin

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What are we reading?
« Reply #195 on: January 02, 2004, 01:52:13 PM »
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Quote from: molly
Franzen: Corrections
will they make a movie out of it?


Quote from: In another thread, MacGuffin
Hot off the anticipated success of THE HOURS, producer Scott Rudin and director Stephen Daldry are set to reteam to adapt Michael Chabon's novel THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF KAVALIER AND CLAY. Chabon, currently writing THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN for Sony, won a Pulitzer Prize for his work on that novel. KAVALIER follows two young Jewish cousins who use their own post-WWII experiences to create comic-books in their bedrooms. Daldry and Rudin are also working on an adaptation of Jonathan Franzen's THE CORRECTIONS, best known for being the book/author who snubbed the Oprah book group. Daldry would begin filming KAVALIER next and CORRECTIONS shortly thereafter. Rudin, who recently left his post on the Jim Carrey LEMONY SNICKET adaptation, would produce both.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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godardian

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What are we reading?
« Reply #196 on: January 02, 2004, 03:45:20 PM »
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Quote from: molly
Franzen: Corrections
will they make a movie out of it?


Good show, molly! I LOVED that book. It made me think deeply and cry; two of my favorites.

My recommendation for your next book (if you like it): Jeffrey Eugenides's Middlesex. Two examples of the renaissance of the American novel. Both powerful, exceptionally written, rich masterworks.

Hopefully MacG will keep us posted on the status of the movie. If they can transplant the richness and relevance of plot and characterization from the page to the screen, it has the potential to approach the magnitdue and brilliance of Magnolia.

Me ("looking at" more than "reading"):

""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

molly

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What are we reading?
« Reply #197 on: January 02, 2004, 04:57:42 PM »
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corrections are 700 pages long and i'm very interested to see how will it look. I really hope they won't screw it up. I loved the way it's written, so funny and serious at the same time, so juicy.

blueminded

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« Reply #198 on: January 02, 2004, 05:41:08 PM »
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first af all, i enjoyed brave new world...and it also seemed spooky to me.
when i first read it i thouht "this guy made predictions that seems to be kinda possible in the future"...the thing was...:i though that a few years ago, he thought it in 1931 when a brave new world was written.
Orwell's 1984 was an aumented proyection of the future in a present that contained stalinism and and an immediate past that saw the blooming of nacizm.
a brave new world was written before hitler took power in germany; in 1931 systematic terrorism wasn't the contemporary obsesive topic as in 1948; also the huxley's dictatorship was less brutal as orwell's.
so, orwell's 1984 in the context of 1948 seemed extremely convincent, but at least dictators are mortal, and circunstances changes.
nuclear war was a prediction of the whole world, but if we think that  we wont be destroyed by great power nations, it semms that porbabilities goes more to a brave new world innit?. haha
excess of population is the easiest way to the brave new world "nightmare", and excess of population is the road in wich were all walking.
anyway, i found this book "brave new world revisited", huxley wrote it 27 years after a brave newworld, and he wrote something like this:" i feel less optimistic that when i wrote a brave new world. the profecies ive made in 1931 seems to appear more quickly than i tought; but the interval between insufficient order and excesive order shows no sign to begin..." but...what about now?
well i recomend it, it's the objective point of view of the writer of a brave new world, and that give us a chance to understand a bit more the first one, that was more like a novel or a tale.

at the moment im reading steppenwolf by hesse (its like the fourth time) one of my favourites.

ciao.

ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ

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What are we reading?
« Reply #199 on: January 02, 2004, 08:09:04 PM »
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If I was to get into Timothy Leary, does anyone have any suggestions of where to start?
"As a matter of fact I only work with the feeling of something magical, something seemingly significant. And to keep it magical I don't want to know the story involved, I just want the hypnotic effect of it somehow seeming significant without knowing why." - Len Lye

Pubrick

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« Reply #200 on: January 02, 2004, 10:30:56 PM »
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Quote from: Walrus, KooKookajoob
If I was to get into Timothy Leary, does anyone have any suggestions of where to start?

dmt.

no, wait. that's terence mckenna.
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MacGuffin

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« Reply #201 on: January 03, 2004, 02:10:49 AM »
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“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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A Matter Of Chance

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What are we reading?
« Reply #202 on: January 03, 2004, 10:11:54 AM »
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Quote from: godardian
Quote from: molly
Franzen: Corrections
will they make a movie out of it?


Good show, molly! I LOVED that book. It made me think deeply and cry; two of my favorites.

My recommendation for your next book (if you like it): Jeffrey Eugenides's Middlesex.


I loved The Corrections and Middlesex, I think both are great books.

godardian

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What are we reading?
« Reply #203 on: January 03, 2004, 11:12:54 AM »
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Quote from: A Matter Of Chance
Quote from: godardian
Quote from: molly
Franzen: Corrections
will they make a movie out of it?


Good show, molly! I LOVED that book. It made me think deeply and cry; two of my favorites.

My recommendation for your next book (if you like it): Jeffrey Eugenides's Middlesex.


I loved The Corrections and Middlesex, I think both are great books.


 :yabbse-thumbup:   :-D  :!:
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

SoNowThen

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What are we reading?
« Reply #204 on: January 05, 2004, 09:10:48 AM »
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Makes Catcher In The Rye seem like feel-good morning television... old JD's a bit of a depressive (and that's why I love him).
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

godardian

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« Reply #205 on: January 05, 2004, 11:10:29 AM »
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Quote from: SoNowThen


Makes Catcher In The Rye seem like feel-good morning television... old JD's a bit of a depressive (and that's why I love him).


I got this and Franny and Zooey for the Christmas 2 years ago, and devoured them- they were read and re-read by New Year's.

My favorites are "The Laughing Man" and "Down at the Dinghy."
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

SoNowThen

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What are we reading?
« Reply #206 on: January 05, 2004, 11:14:16 AM »
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Yeah, I got both for Christmas this year!!


And so far, Laughing Man is for sure the best one.
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

Ghostboy

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What are we reading?
« Reply #207 on: January 05, 2004, 11:18:29 AM »
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The Laughing Man is probably the most amazing short story I've ever read. If it's not, than whatever is would probably be from Nine Stories too.

If you haven't read Franny & Zooey yet, SoNowThen, do so. I'd be really interested in hearing what you think of it, actually, considering your religious beliefs. I tried to get one of my friends who is devoutly Christian to read it, but she hasn't yet.

I have this dream that Salinger will die and his writings from the past decades will be bequeathed to a publishing house and released intermittnently for years to come. Can you imagine how exciting that would be? Of course, it would probably include plenty of letdowns. The literary equivalent of the Star Wars prequels (as far as anticipation, not actual content).

SoNowThen

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« Reply #208 on: January 05, 2004, 11:24:10 AM »
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You really think letdowns??? I can't imagine not loving every single thing I ever read by Salinger...

F&Z is right next on the list. Last year was the only year I haven't read Catcher at least once, so I'm feeling like I gotta make it up in '04.
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

mogwai

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What are we reading?
« Reply #209 on: January 05, 2004, 11:28:30 AM »
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just finished reading this one:



i'm going to read the following books:

the nirvana biography "come as you are" by michael azerrad.
the mötley crüe biography "the dirt" by neil strauss.
the john densmore biography "riders on the storm" by john densmore.

i love music.

 

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