Author Topic: What are we reading?  (Read 111397 times)

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polkablues

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1500 on: April 09, 2013, 04:28:34 PM »
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I don't know anything about the book, but I can definitely see the fontspiration.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

Reelist

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1501 on: April 09, 2013, 04:46:51 PM »
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Ken Levine (creator of Bioshock Infinite) listed this as one of his inspirations for the game, along with There Will Be Blood.

Fuuuuck, I literally just saw this at the bookstore for $1 and didn't even consider picking it up. I knew I remembered it from here!


This bad boy:

You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

jenkins

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1502 on: April 09, 2013, 05:21:45 PM »
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mmm. keep wanting to read inherent vice based on pynchon, avoiding 'cause of pt. feels confusing! but prob exciting either way :))
Every perspective is an act of creation.

©brad

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1503 on: April 10, 2013, 09:57:08 AM »
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Yeah I'm holding out on Inherent Vice until after I see the movie.

Reading this now and it's amazing.


03

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1504 on: April 27, 2013, 11:11:07 PM »
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wilder

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1505 on: June 18, 2013, 03:48:07 PM »
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Sleepless in Hollywood: Tales from the New Abnormal in the Movie Business - Amazon


I read this this past week. Lynda Obst (Producer of Sleepless in Seattle, The Fisher King, How to Lose A Guy in 10 Days, and the upcoming Interstellar) had written one book previously called Hello, He Lied, which was about the day-to-day trials and tribulations of her experience as a producer in Hollywood during the 80s and mid-90s. This latest book, published a little over a week ago, is about the transformation the film industry has undergone this past decade, and especially since the 2008 writer's strike, as seen from the inside.

What struck me most about the book was how it married all these topics everyone's heads are swirling around -- the media conglomerate's purchasing of the studios, the growth of international box office revenues in the past five years dwarfing domestic (and what that means for story and the kinds of projects that get made), the general inversion of film and TV quality as of late, the talent-studio relationship transformation (and death of star power), the decline of DVD sales and the rise of VOD and streaming as a substitute or alternative to theatrical releases, tentpole and franchise-think everywhere, the internet and video games replacing movies as the entertainment go-to, Intellectual Property as gospel, and spec-script buying as a dinosaur, into one cohesive, clear narrative.

Salon published an excerpt from the book you can read online. The first chapter is also available to preview on Amazon.

wilder

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1506 on: June 29, 2013, 07:52:44 PM »
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Obst was interviewed on this week's episode of KCRW's The Business, beginning at the 8 minute mark.

wilder

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1507 on: September 02, 2013, 05:26:51 PM »
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Lottery

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1508 on: September 02, 2013, 09:11:10 PM »
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This again. I really need some new fiction.
Has anyone read Asimov's Foundation series? Is it good? His short stories are pretty damn good.

jenkins

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1509 on: September 04, 2013, 02:22:24 AM »
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i read two asimov robot books in high school and since then i've read random short stories, so i'm not helpful in that area. are you in the mood for sci-fi alone? if not, what other kind of literature tends to interest you?
Every perspective is an act of creation.

Sleepless

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Lottery

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1511 on: September 05, 2013, 11:49:03 PM »
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i read two asimov robot books in high school and since then i've read random short stories, so i'm not helpful in that area. are you in the mood for sci-fi alone? if not, what other kind of literature tends to interest you?

Not necessarily sci-fi but I want to read some of the good classic stuff. Otherwise, anything really (that said, I do feel like reading something post 1940s though). For reference, my favourite authors are (I think, there's probably someone major that has sipped my mind)) Kurt Vonnegut, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez and Cormac McCarthy.

Frederico Fellini

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1512 on: September 05, 2013, 11:58:17 PM »
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I made it to page 92 today. It's fucking hard to read Pynchon. I actually spend less time reading it and more time googling references, historical facts and meanings of words I've never read or heard before. But it's fun.
We fought against the day and we won... WE WON.

Cinema is something you do for a billion years... or not at all.

jenkins

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1513 on: September 06, 2013, 04:14:31 AM »
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I want to read some of the good classic stuff.
post 1940s
Kurt Vonnegut, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez and Cormac McCarthy.

seize the day is saul bellow in 56, his fourth book, followed eight years later by herzog (!) (TIME magazine named it one of the 100 best novels in the English language since "the beginning of TIME")

saul bellow writes about people. people mania. classic existentialism

not a classic, not on wikipedia, a book i'm reading mentioned béla tarr. this is the conversation's ending
Quote
Béla Tarr would discern what is absolute about my yard, W. says. He'd register its every detail in a twenty minute tracking shot. The sewage, the concrete, the bin bags and rotting plants . . . the yard would mean more to Béla Tarr than all our nonsense.

Béla Tarr said that the walls, the rain and the dogs in his films have their own stories, which are more important than so-called human stories. He said that the scenery, the weather, the locations and time itself have their own faces. Their own faces! Yes, we're agreed, the yard, the horror of the yard, is the only thing around here in which Béla Tarr would be interested.
Every perspective is an act of creation.

Cloudy

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Re: What are we reading?
« Reply #1514 on: November 21, 2013, 12:19:32 AM »
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Quote
Béla Tarr would discern what is absolute about my yard, W. says. He'd register its every detail in a twenty minute tracking shot. The sewage, the concrete, the bin bags and rotting plants . . . the yard would mean more to Béla Tarr than all our nonsense.

Béla Tarr said that the walls, the rain and the dogs in his films have their own stories, which are more important than so-called human stories. He said that the scenery, the weather, the locations and time itself have their own faces. Their own faces! Yes, we're agreed, the yard, the horror of the yard, is the only thing around here in which Béla Tarr would be interested.
[/quote]

Really enjoyed the quotage, been trying to consume as much Bela Tarr as possible. It's weird, it took me getting physically sick with a head-ache and fever to truly plunge into it. Now I can't leave, it's all so musical and flows unlike anything else.
The book doesn't sound like anything that would mention Bela Tarr. Interesting.
Also, this Saul Bellow quote seems totally relevant:
"The physical body is an agent of the spirit and its mirror. it is an engine and a reflection of the spirit. It is the spirit's ingenious memorandum to itself and the spirit sees itself in my body, just as I see my own face in a looking glass. My nerves reflect this. The earth is literally a mirror of thoughts. Objects themselves are embodied thoughts. Death is the dark backing that a mirror needs if we are to see anything."

 

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