Author Topic: other French New Wave-ers  (Read 9306 times)

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I Don't Believe in Beatles

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2006, 08:01:34 PM »
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i saw Celine and Julie Go Boating today.

!

How?  Old videotape? 
"A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what's behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later." --Stanley Kubrick

samsong

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #31 on: April 25, 2006, 11:27:07 PM »
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the library had it. they also have The Nun and Joan the Maid: The Battles and The Prisons so hopefully i can watch those before i go home.

SoNowThen

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #32 on: May 05, 2006, 06:30:08 PM »
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Rivette retrospectives are bubbling around the world right now.

So I've seen his first five films, uncut, finally. And when I say "uncut", I mean I made it through the massive (12hr 45min) mutherfucker that is Out 1.

It may be weird (and totally out in the dark) to say, but L'Amour Fou is unquestionably the masterpiece of this lot. And I would bring La Religieuse in a close second.

Anyway, it occured to me (for the third straight time in a row now) watching Celine And Julie tonight, that at about the 1 1/2 hour mark of all his long movies, you want to break Rivette's fucking nose... but then when you stick it out, as the last half hour is wrapping up, you're really really sad there's not more movie to go. This guy is unquestionably an essential filmmaker, too bad more stuff isn't available on dvd...

As a final aside, Juliet Berto is his Anna Karina (disregarding the fact that he did use Anna, and that Bulle Ogier is the most-repeated actress). Berto is a firebomb -- pure and simple. Thank you for the extended topless shower scene, Jacques. Thank you.
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

squints

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #33 on: October 02, 2006, 11:57:13 PM »
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i just bought this magnificent Chabrol film

One of the most interesting new wave films i've yet to see. I initially thought i'd throw this one at GT to get his opinion but after a search it seems he hasn't seen it (or at least he hadn't in 2003)

I could definitely see the comparisons to Hitchcock that always seem to pop up in literature or reviews about the film and i'm hoping Macguffin has at least seen it (it seems SHAFTR is the only one)

This has one of my favorite endings ever. The tortured girl staring directly into the camera and smiling for the last few seconds instantly reminded me of magnolia

spoily:
the various bits of mise-en-scene referencing the stalker's evil side (the bat at the zoo, the 666 on his license plate, and obviously the close-up of his horrendously sinister cackling grin) were great

i'd recommend this to anyone
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MacGuffin

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #34 on: October 03, 2006, 01:09:01 AM »
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I could definitely see the comparisons to Hitchcock that always seem to pop up in literature or reviews about the film and i'm hoping Macguffin has at least seen it (it seems SHAFTR is the only one)

Sadly, no. The only Hitchcock comparison films I've seen around that era are by Henri-Georges Clouzot.
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godardian

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #35 on: October 05, 2006, 11:40:08 PM »
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I've seen Les Bonnes Femmes, and--while I don't know how "Hitchcockian" I'd really call it, though it would have to be much more thematically than stylistically--it is very well worth checking out if you get the chance.
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I Don't Believe in Beatles

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2006, 11:21:10 AM »
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The Pacific Film Archive is having a Rivette program running from Nov. 2 to Dec. 16th. 

http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/pfa_programs/jrivette/index.html
"A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what's behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later." --Stanley Kubrick

meatwad

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #37 on: November 12, 2006, 11:59:52 AM »
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For all you New York people, the Museum of the Moving Image is having a Rivette retrospective. I saw Celine and Julie Go Boating and Paris Belongs To Us yesterday, and plan on seeing a few more in the next couple of weeks, including Out 1.




Paris Belongs to Us
Friday, November 10, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 11, 3:00 p.m.

Céline and Julie Go Boating
Saturday, November 11, 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 12, 4:30 p.m.

Jacques Rivette, The Night Watchman
Saturday, November 18, 2:00 p.m.

The Nun
Saturday, November 18, 4:30 p.m.

Duelle
Saturday, November 18, 7:30 p.m.

Jean Renoir, The Boss
Sunday, November 19, 2:00 p.m.

Noroît
Sunday, November 19, 4:30 p.m.

Up/Down/Fragile
Friday, November 24, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 25, 6:30 p.m.

La Belle Noiseuse

Saturday, November 25, 2:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 26, 6:30 p.m.

Joan the Maid
Sunday, November 26, 2:00 p.m.

Le Pont du Nord
Saturday, December 2, 2:00 p.m.

Love on the Ground
Saturday, December 2, 5:00 p.m.

Wuthering Heights
Saturday, December 2, 7:30 p.m.

L'Amour Fou
Introduced by Jonathan Rosenbaum
Sunday, December 3, 4:30 p.m.

Out 1
Saturday, December 9, 2:00 p.m. Episodes 1-4 (396 mins.)
Sunday, December 10, 2:00 p.m. Episodes 5-8 (347 mins.)

Merry-Go-Round
Saturday, December 16, 3:00 p.m.

Divertimento
Saturday, December 16, 6:00 p.m.
Friday, December 22, 7:30 p.m.

Out 1: Spectre
Sunday, December 17, 2:00 p.m.

The Gang of Four
Sunday, December 17, 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, December 24, 2:00 p.m.

Secret Defense
Saturday, December 23, 2:00 p.m.

The Story of Marie and Julien
Sunday, December 23, 6:00 p.m.
Friday, December 29, 7:30 p.m.

Va Savoir
Saturday, December 30, 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, December 31, 5:00 p.m.

samsong

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #38 on: December 03, 2006, 10:03:34 PM »
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i just got back from L'Amour Fou.  it was like seeing Au hasard balthazar for the first time, in that it changed my outlook on cinema and LIFE.  probably the best movie i've ever seen... after Au hasard balthazar... and Playtime... and...

samsong

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #39 on: December 11, 2006, 01:41:26 AM »
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i drank from the cineaste's holy grail (Out 1, in case you didn't know) and it was scrumptrulescent.
i'm a faggot.

Pubrick

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #40 on: December 11, 2006, 01:50:16 AM »
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i drank from the cineaste's holy grail (Out 1, in case you didn't know) and it was scrumptrulescent.
i'm a faggot.
make sure to use those exact same words when you come out to your parents.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

I Don't Believe in Beatles

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #41 on: April 19, 2007, 11:54:40 PM »
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Bay Area folks, the PFA Rivette retrospective has returned.

Saturday, June 9, 2007
2:00 p.m. Out 1, Episodes 1–4

Sunday, June 10, 2007
2:00 p.m. Out 1, Episodes 5–8

Sunday, June 17, 2007
3:00 p.m. L’amour fou

Tuesday, June 26, 2007
7:00 p.m. The Gang of Four
"A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what's behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later." --Stanley Kubrick

Pubrick

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2007, 11:47:25 PM »
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(sort of) newly opened gallery of modern art in brisbane is trying honorably to bring a little culture to this town. various retrospectives hav screened throughout the year, like all of osamu tezuka's films and shorts, buster keaton (upcoming), and right now over the next couple months they're having an extensive french new wave program.

included are films pre- and post-new wave. as well as films from the 90s which are being touted as "new new wave". i don't think i'll hav time for those new ones unless someone can tell me they actually exist and it's not just some label being given to good french movies of the last 15 years. the dardenne bros are not included in this New New Wave.

here's the program. i've already missed a few i should have seen, but luckily the best are still to come. that is all those Rivette epics mentioned so far in this thread (out 1, l'amour fou, uncut. as well as millions of truffaut, 5 or so Rohmer (not the complete moral tales), Chabrol, Resnais, and godard. check out the program and tell me if you envy me. makes those piss weak festivals listed above look like crap huh.

celine et julie vont en bateau is not showing but i can find it at my library. if there's some hidden gems in that program like les bonnes femmes for example, that i wouldn't immediately think are must-see, do tell.

look around the 4 subsections, they hav pics and synopses.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

SoNowThen

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #43 on: September 16, 2007, 01:59:36 AM »
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I'd never heard of this before, but it sounds awesome, and probably isn't available on dvd: Santa Claus Has Blue Eyes (Le Père Noël a les Yeux Bleus).

Sounds cool (a little like Sartre), and also probably very hard to see otherwise: The War Is Over (La Guerre est Finie).

You could probably get this from a local library on vhs, but it is one of the first New Wave movies I ever saw, and is really interesting (plus the accompanying Black Panthers interview will probably be something to see): Happiness (Le Bonheur).

Out 1 is a monster... do it if you have the time and energy (and you will need TONS of both). But the two must-see Rivette's are, I must repeat, The Nun and Crazy Love.

I've always wanted to see The Mother And The Whore but have never found it. I assume you have. Maybe you could go to the showing with a Hi8 handicam, sell the tape to a chinese guy, who will in turn sell it to me?
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

SoNowThen

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Re: other French New Wave-ers
« Reply #44 on: September 16, 2007, 06:29:23 AM »
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One other thing that I just thought of (and never posted about at the time) -- one of my best viewing experiences of 2007 had been Rivette's "Gang Of Four". I think I'd consider it his #2 best of all time, and it seems to be a perfect summation of what he was reaching for in Paris Belongs To Us and Out 1; that blend of unexplainable mystery, repeated performance of subtle variations (watched, critiqued, and performed by the characters as "themselves" and as "characters"), and road-map of Paris. I guess that sounds like EVERY Rivette movie, but for some reason I group his work into two sections, with The Beautiful Troublemaker, Crazy Love, The Nun (artists and their passions, or some such thing) on one side, and Gang Of Four heading the second column of nearly everything else.

Anyway, it's available on disc (perhaps out of print but still up for purchase at a reasonable price), and looks quite good. Well worth seeking out.
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

 

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