Author Topic: Who framed Roger Rabbit?  (Read 30623 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +639
Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2003, 01:34:01 AM »
0
Quote from: bonanzataz
what's up with that? i bought the bttf dvd's when they first came out, how can i get the good ones?


Please send Back to the Future disks 2 and 3, without the case, and a letter with the following information: Name, Full Mailing Address, Daytime Phone Number, Reason for Return and Return Address. Send to:

Back to the Future DVD Returns
PO Box 224468
Dallas, Texas 75260

Thank you,
Universal Studios Customer Service
888.703.0010

For more info
click here.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

moonshiner

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 279
  • Respect: 0
Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2003, 09:16:20 AM »
0
i'm not a big fan of Disney or Michael Eisner, and the Disney "vault" is really offensive.
the rumble of the train trails off to infinity, a place where no one goes anymore

JC, no not that one

Duck Sauce

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1986
  • Respect: +4
Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2003, 01:31:20 PM »
0
Quote from: moonshiner
i'm not a big fan of Disney or Michael Eisner, and the Disney "vault" is really offensive.


And Im just not a big fan of Eisner

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +639
Re: Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2007, 10:45:01 PM »
0
‘Roger Rabbit’ Sequel Still In The Offing? Stay Tooned, Says Producer
Source: MTV

Ask Judge Doom: no toon can resist the old “Shave-and-a-Haircut” gag. But when plans went around Hollywood for a sequel to the 1988 classic “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” a lot of powerful people suddenly realized it would take more than the promise of “Two-bits” for Roger to come busting through the door.

Now, nearly twenty years after “Roger Rabbit” first exploded onto the big screen, producer Frank Marshall told MTV News that he’s still “open” to the possibility of another film, derailed in the mid-90s because of what would have then been cost-prohibitive special effects.

But don’t hate Roger for the fact that the movie didn’t get made in the first place. He’s not expensive…he’s just drawn that way.

“It came pretty close. We shot a test. We had a script. But unfortunately, we didn’t have computer generated animation quite yet - it was just too expensive,” Marshall explained of the untitled sequel project, “Roger Rabbit 2.” “If you think about it, in the original movie there’s really only 48 minutes of animation and in the new movie - or in that movie - he was in everything. So it went from 48 minutes of animation to over 100 minutes of animation.

“I remember we shot the test to try and see how much we could do with digital props - We weren’t even into digital characters yet,” Marshall continued. “The idea was to see what we could do with digital props as opposed to what we did in the original movie where everything was puppeted - all the props were puppeted by strings and wires and poles.”

For the first time ever, Marshall also revealed details of the plot of “Roger Rabbit 2,” and if you thought Toontown was a trip, you should have seen where they were sending Roger next.

“New York!” Marshall enthused of the setting for the second film. “Roger was a song and dance man in New York City [when he] discovered that he wanted to be in the movies and so he came across the country. I remember there being a big dance number. He came out with a troupe of sort of Busby Berkeley dancers on a train and they got to Hollywood and he and Baby Herman moved in together. And that’s when he met Eddie Valiant.”

Sounds too good to pass up, especially now that studios like Pixar exist (and under Disney no less), to help with Computer Animation. So ok, Mr. Marshall, what if we say “P-p-p-p-p-please!”

“Definitely,” Marshall playfully responded. “I’ll put in a call to [Pixar chief John] Lasseter after I hang up.”
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +639
Re: Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2009, 10:51:43 AM »
0
EXCLUSIVE: Robert Zemeckis ‘Buzzing’ About Second ‘Roger Rabbit’ Movie
Source: MTV

“Who Framed Roger Rabbit” came out 20 years ago and grossed $330 million worldwide, and for all the talk about another big screen venture for the animated bunny and his voluptuous sweetheart Jessica, nothing over the last two decades moved into production. And it was starting to seem like nothing ever would.

But when MTV News caught up with director Robert Zemeckis recently, he dropped a news bomb that had our eyes popping cartoon-style out of our sockets. “I’ll tell you what is buzzing around in my head now that we have the ability—the digital tools, performance capture—I’m starting to think about ‘Roger Rabbit,’” he told us.

Combing traditional animation with live-action, “Roger Rabbit” was a staggering achievement that employed cutting-edge technology without sacrificing the demands of first-rate storytelling. It won four Oscars, including nods for visual effects, editing and a special achievement award for animation direction. But Zemeckis hasn’t toiled in live-action since 2000’s “Cast Away”, preferring instead to work with performance capture in films like “The Polar Express” and the upcoming Jim Carrey vehicle, “A Christmas Carol.”

All of which had us desperate for any more info Zemeckis could provide about a new “Roger Rabbit.” When pressed, however, he demurred.

P-p-p-please?!

“I can’t give you more details,” Zemeckis said, letting us down gently.

Okay, then, we’ll air our questions here. How exactly will performance capture factor in? When we spoke recently with Michael Lantieri, the special effects supervisor on the original “Roger Rabbit,” he talked about how very soon filmmakers will be able to combine performance capture with outdoor, real-time photography. Might the new “Roger Rabbit” employ this technology? Will the story be lifted from the long-rumored, never-produced “Roger Rabbit” sequel script? Or will Zemeckis commission a new screenplay? And casting! Will the man who voiced, Roger—Charles Fleischer—reprise his role? And might Bob Hoskins as private investigator Eddie Valiant return?

So many questions that shall, alas, remain unanswered for the moment. You’ll just have to, er, stay tooned…
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +639
Re: Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2009, 12:52:43 AM »
0
Exclusive: 'Roger Rabbit' Writers Working On Sequel, Robert Zemeckis Says
Director reveals that original scribes Jeffrey Price and Peter Seaman are developing a script.
Source: MTV

In the spring, and out of nowhere, Robert Zemeckis exclusively revealed to MTV News that new digital tools like performance-capture technology had him buzzing about finally making a sequel to "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." But there's a big difference between being excited about a project and actually moving forward with it.

MTV News has now exclusively learned that Zemeckis is not only pumped to bring the flustered cartoon bunny back to the big screen after 20 years, but that he has commissioned a script. And guess who's writing it? Original scribes Jeffrey Price and Peter Seaman.

"There's a script that's being developed," he revealed, adding, "We've got the original writers that are working on it now — Seaman and Price."

There have been many false starts on another "Roger Rabbit" over the years, with potential sequels and prequels cropping up in rumors but never becoming realities — and for those who think only Zemeckis should helm the second "Roger" helping, that's a good thing. The director said he was never involved in any of those other ideas.

"I think there was a time right after the movie came out that the Disney regime at the time — it was a point in the life of the studio where if you made a successful movie they could no longer afford to hire you back," he laughed. "I guess there were some projects that I don't know anything about."

We learned a bunch more about the upcoming film, info we'll be rolling out in the next couple of days. Just how will Zemeckis employ those new digital tools as he marries cartoons with real people? Which characters from the past — Jessica Rabbit? Eddie Valiant? — will we see? As Zemeckis said with a smile at one point during the interview, "You're gonna have to wait!"
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

Stefen

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 7777
  • smh
  • Respect: +191
Re: Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2009, 12:57:31 AM »
0
Someone needs to lock Bob Zemeckis in a room with some crayons and some scratch paper for a year so he can get this bullshit out of his system and get back to making cool movies.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.

picolas

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Respect: +103
Re: Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2009, 01:05:18 AM »
0
motion-capturing roger rabbit is a perversion of science. any rational man would feel this in his gut.

Ravi

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 4867
  • Respect: +88
Re: Who framed Roger Rabbit?
« Reply #23 on: November 07, 2009, 11:04:57 PM »
0
Mo-cap?  We don't need no stinkin' mo-cap!

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy