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The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)

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Jeremy Blackman

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Reply #390 on: January 06, 2018, 06:12:36 PM
http://deadline.com/2018/01/showtime-more-twin-peaks-im-dying-up-here-season-2-changes-the-affair-end-white-famous-cancellation-tca-1202237216/

Nevins said that there have been no conversations with co-creator/director David Lynch about more episodes. Levine reminded everyone that it took 25 years after the first two seasons for the third one to come about. And noted the herculean effort by Lynch in the past two years to write, direct, act in, edit and score 18 consecutive hours of television. But while Lynch may not be ready to return to TV right away, “the door at Showtime is always open for him to do more Twin Peaks or anything else,” Levine said.
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Drenk

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Reply #391 on: January 09, 2018, 03:00:58 AM
Here is a great meandering article by Sarah Nicole Prickett about the end of Twin Peaks:

https://www.artforum.com/film/#entry73381
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Fernando

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Reply #392 on: January 13, 2018, 11:39:33 AM
Soderbergh made this small comment about TP (pic below) in his Seen, Read 2017 list.

http://extension765.com/soderblogh/32-seen-read-2017


riotmaterial

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Reply #393 on: January 28, 2018, 04:01:49 PM
The New Avant-Garde: David Lynch’s Glorious Late-Career Vision
at Riot Material magazine

by Christopher Hassett

The new Twin Peaks (2017) finds David Lynch working in fresh and sublimely haunting domains, ones that pleasurably flirt or unnervingly skirt the spectral drop-offs of some charged and sinister abyss. This seems no visional or evolutional change of tack, nor does it appear, at least in these early episodes, Lynch is newly surveying unmapped terrains. Rather, there is something more elevated in this late-career landscape, and something far more intimate as well. One senses, when viewing this new series, particularly his excursions into Lynchian Other-Realms, that his articulation of these doppelgänging worlds feel more experiential than conceptual, more occupied than conceptualized.

to read the full article, go to: http://www.riotmaterial.com/david-lynchs-glorious-late-career-vision/


riotmaterial

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Reply #394 on: January 28, 2018, 04:06:08 PM
David Lynch’s Dadaist Apocalypse Via Twin Peaks
Posted originally in Riot Material Magazine (Sept 2017)

by Alci Rengifo

Madness grips the airwaves like a deafening transmission, and the overlords of the earth seem to speak in terrifyingly grim visions. Thank the gods that every age produces its own soothsayers. It is fitting, then, that just as a surreal state of affairs takes hold, David Lynch returned to us with Twin Peaks: The Return, a continuation of his landmark cult 1990s series that combined melodrama with the director’s brand of surrealist imaginings. But not only did Lynch return, he also shows himself to be fully in tune with these new dark ages. Episode 8 of the revival in particular goes beyond television or even cinema — it is one mad flow about our civilization’s communion with dark forces to unleash absolute destruction.

Lynch is the quintessential American surrealist, who along with Alejandro Jodorowsky, is one of the last true keepers of the flame of that hallucinatory, anarchic moment where art and dream combined to expose the world. Newer talents like Greece’s Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster, Killing of a Sacred Deer) retain the essence of surrealism, but it is masters like Lynch who provide a window into where we come from, and where we are going.

The entire Twin Peaks revival has been a chance for Lynch to fully indulge — through the freedom of cable television — in the obsessions, nightmares and visions that have fueled his work since that classic 1977 debut Eraserhead. Yet this new Twin Peaks is also closer to Lynch’s cinema where the dark, bloody heart of Americana erupts in murderous dreamscapes such as Blue Velvet, Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive. In particular Episode 8 of Twin Peaks: The Return pushes further than even those movies, revealing a filmmaker attuned to the concerns of his species.

to read the full article, go to: http://www.riotmaterial.com/david-lynchs-dadaist-apocalypse-via-twin-peaks/


Drenk

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Reply #395 on: June 10, 2019, 02:43:45 PM
The Return is the best commentary about all our current returns.

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Sleepless

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Reply #396 on: November 19, 2019, 10:17:43 AM
lol

Quote
We asked our panel of critics to name the film that defined this decade

It’s “Twin Peaks: The Return”, without question. Aside its mere inclusion in several year end lists on the side of movies sparking a whole discussion about the geographical limits between cinema and television, Lynch’s 18 hours journey back to his television creation is the absolute visual translation of the whole general feeling of uneasiness and overall discomfort that the past decade transmitted in all fields. It was a reversal on all the nostalgia mechanics we grew accustomed to in big budget Hollywood productions because in the end Lynch “returned” to those characters and situations just to remember his audience that this inquietude is historically continuous, unbeatable and eternal, constantly changing only to keep us restraint as we watch our worst fears become true. Even after three years and numerous movies, episodes and “content” (the new favorite terminology of Hollywood), there only a few images (if not none) that match that final Laura Palmer scream in intensity, horror and despair because it erupts a singular and claustrophobic feeling of being forever trapped in this nightmare we call reality, a continuous sense of fear that tragically will never be “solved” or made disappear – and in the end, the 2010’s were all about coming to this exact same conclusion.
He held on. The dolphin and all the rest of its pod turned and swam out to sea, and still he held on. This is it, he thought. Then he remembered that they were air-breathers too. It was going to be all right.


Jeremy Blackman

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Reply #397 on: November 19, 2019, 10:57:47 AM
Fine, then Lost Season 6 is the best film of 2010.
"Hunger is the purest sin"


Alexandro

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Reply #398 on: November 19, 2019, 06:41:22 PM
lol

Quote
We asked our panel of critics to name the film that defined this decade

It’s “Twin Peaks: The Return”, without question. Aside its mere inclusion in several year end lists on the side of movies sparking a whole discussion about the geographical limits between cinema and television, Lynch’s 18 hours journey back to his television creation is the absolute visual translation of the whole general feeling of uneasiness and overall discomfort that the past decade transmitted in all fields. It was a reversal on all the nostalgia mechanics we grew accustomed to in big budget Hollywood productions because in the end Lynch “returned” to those characters and situations just to remember his audience that this inquietude is historically continuous, unbeatable and eternal, constantly changing only to keep us restraint as we watch our worst fears become true. Even after three years and numerous movies, episodes and “content” (the new favorite terminology of Hollywood), there only a few images (if not none) that match that final Laura Palmer scream in intensity, horror and despair because it erupts a singular and claustrophobic feeling of being forever trapped in this nightmare we call reality, a continuous sense of fear that tragically will never be “solved” or made disappear – and in the end, the 2010’s were all about coming to this exact same conclusion.

You know, just the other day I was thinking of that question and came to the same conclusion, kind of. Really, I feel the whole season is the best film of the decade... you know, being permissive with categories and all... I have seen it twice and from time to time I just watch a random episode, and it's always a richer experience than before. So yeah, why not?


Drenk

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Reply #399 on: November 19, 2019, 07:17:32 PM
You can't watch a random episode of a movie because movies aren't TV series. Then: The Return is truly cinematic. Most TV shows are just expertly—or not that expertly—producing images. There's no need to classify a series as a movie. One of the excitments of The Return is also contained in the way it is divided, the flow between the episodes, the way it plays with our expectations as TV viewers.



Anyway, yes: one of my favs, ever, to watch.
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eward

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Reply #400 on: November 19, 2019, 07:21:40 PM
Embarrassed to say I still haven't seen it. Not big on the original series outside of the pilot, but I love Fire Walk With Me.
If I could move the night I would
And I would turn the world around if I could
There's nothing wrong with loving something you can't hold in your hand
You're sitting on the edge of the bed, smoking and shaking your head
Well there's nothing wrong with loving things that cannot even stand
Well there goes your moony man
With his suitcase in his hand
Every road is lined with animals
That rise from their blood and walk
Well the moon won't get a wink of sleep
If I stay all night and talk


Drenk

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Reply #401 on: November 19, 2019, 07:25:09 PM
Go for it!  :bravo:

I'm not a big fan of the original show, too.
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jenkins

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Reply #402 on: November 19, 2019, 07:29:39 PM
i can't tell you one goddamn thing about the plot but i watched the whole Return and basically nobody is as singular as Lynch. and he's that thing where the only way you could be like him is to be yourself, but many people trying to be like him are fucking it up by trying to be like him, and you just can't


Sleepless

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Reply #403 on: November 20, 2019, 08:21:02 AM
I didn't mean to open up the whole "is it TV or film" debate again.

Though I will say I think it's the greatest cinematic achievement of the past decade. Pure Lynch. Every few weeks I feel like I want to go back and watch it all over again because of one little moment (the "I've Been Loving You Too Long" moment a prime example) but haven't yet had the urge to just put on a single episode. I think you need the whole piece because it builds on itself (and everything Lynch has done previously) and that all the pieces matter in order to achieve the cathartic experience it promises. I fucking love TP:TR so fucking much. Eward, while there's history to Twin Peaks (and I absolutely would recommend you go back and watch S1 and certain eps of S2), you would certainly appreciate this just going into The Rturn based on what you've already seen. (FYI, the ultimate Twin Peaks A to Z boxset is out in time for the xmas.)

The line from those remarks I lolled at (which was my reason for posting) I attempted to bold, but now I realize that the bolding doesn't work on the dark theme:

Quote
it erupts a singular and claustrophobic feeling of being forever trapped in this nightmare we call reality, a continuous sense of fear that tragically will never be “solved” or made disappear – and in the end, the 2010’s were all about coming to this exact same conclusion.

He held on. The dolphin and all the rest of its pod turned and swam out to sea, and still he held on. This is it, he thought. Then he remembered that they were air-breathers too. It was going to be all right.


Alexandro

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Reply #404 on: November 20, 2019, 10:49:09 AM
You can't watch a random episode of a movie because movies aren't TV series. Then: The Return is truly cinematic.

Well, I can.

Obviously after seeing it full twice. But even then, and I do get what you guys are saying about how the series builds up episode by episode... well, even considering that, what's so great about this series in particular is precisely that it's so rich in cinematic value that you can actually just put some episode randomly and enjoy it scene by scene without the narrative payoffs of most other series (or films for that matter) around.