Author Topic: Kubrick's Best Film  (Read 29445 times)

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cowboykurtis

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Kubrick's Best Film
« Reply #60 on: May 04, 2003, 11:32:07 AM »
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I don't think Kubrick necessarily had to show so much.  


what is this referring to? are you saying he didn't have too much to show as a director? or are you speaking about "you wish he handn't shown so much" in a certian film...either way; in what context is this comment?
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Pedro

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Kubrick's Best Film
« Reply #61 on: May 04, 2003, 02:33:20 PM »
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Quote from: cowboykurtis
Quote from: Link
I don't think Kubrick necessarily had to show so much.  


what is this referring to? are you saying he didn't have too much to show as a director? or are you speaking about "you wish he handn't shown so much" in a certian film...either way; in what context is this comment?

He wishes that A Clockwork Orange wasn't as violent.

cowboykurtis

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« Reply #62 on: May 04, 2003, 03:37:04 PM »
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Quote from: Pedro the Wombat
Quote from: cowboykurtis
Quote from: Link
I don't think Kubrick necessarily had to show so much.  


what is this referring to? are you saying he didn't have too much to show as a director? or are you speaking about "you wish he handn't shown so much" in a certian film...either way; in what context is this comment?

He wishes that A Clockwork Orange wasn't as violent.


the whole point of a wish, is to wish for something that has the possibility of coming true -- unfortunately that wish, is about as close to a lost cause as one can get.
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USTopGun47

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« Reply #63 on: May 18, 2003, 07:02:05 PM »
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I must say - Clockwork Orange is artistically brilliant.  However, i think it gets a little overated at times for breaking barriers with violence and sex.  NOT that i have a problem with that.  but i think it contributes too much to its esteem.  I love the book, however, and think Kubrick did a GREAT visual adaptation.  i opt for 2001.  it's all about pace and development with kubrick.  truly genius.  dr. strangelove coming in 2nd
I'm somebody now, Harry. Everybody likes me. Soon, millions of people will see me and they'll all like me. I'll tell them about you, and your father, how good he was to us. Remember? It's a reason to get up in the morning. It's a reason to lose weight, to fit in the red dress. It's a reason to smile. It makes tomorrow all right. What have I got Harry, hm? Why should I even make the bed, or wash the dishes? I do them, but why should I? I'm alone. Your father's gone, you're gone. I got no one to care for. What have I got, Harry? I'm lonely. I'm old.

godardian

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Kubrick's Best Film
« Reply #64 on: May 18, 2003, 07:30:32 PM »
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Quote from: USTopGun47
I must say - Clockwork Orange is artistically brilliant.  However, i think it gets a little overated at times for breaking barriers with violence and sex.  NOT that i have a problem with that.  but i think it contributes too much to its esteem.  I love the book, however, and think Kubrick did a GREAT visual adaptation.  i opt for 2001.  it's all about pace and development with kubrick.  truly genius.  dr. strangelove coming in 2nd


Yeah, I went to a screening of Clockwork Orange at the WB 75th Anniversary Retrospective, and the "cult" that came out seemed not to fully understand the film, or had decided just to focus on and celebrate one part (the sex and violence graphically depicted) and ignore the other (the implication of us all in the eternal struggle of free will vs. guarantees).

Same thing happened with Taxi Driver, obviously. Both films well worth loving, but it seems some people love them for dubious reasons, or because they're way misconstruing what they're about.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

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USTopGun47

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« Reply #65 on: May 18, 2003, 07:42:33 PM »
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Oh so true about Taxi Driver.  People really buy into shock value.  It seems like they could make more good movies about an anti-hero today though, you really don't see any.   :P
I'm somebody now, Harry. Everybody likes me. Soon, millions of people will see me and they'll all like me. I'll tell them about you, and your father, how good he was to us. Remember? It's a reason to get up in the morning. It's a reason to lose weight, to fit in the red dress. It's a reason to smile. It makes tomorrow all right. What have I got Harry, hm? Why should I even make the bed, or wash the dishes? I do them, but why should I? I'm alone. Your father's gone, you're gone. I got no one to care for. What have I got, Harry? I'm lonely. I'm old.

Lucinda Bryte

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« Reply #66 on: August 14, 2003, 03:57:23 PM »
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A Clockwork Orange

SoNowThen

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« Reply #67 on: August 14, 2003, 03:59:10 PM »
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Quote from: Lucinda Bryte
A Clockwork Orange


Agreed
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

Lucinda Bryte

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« Reply #68 on: August 15, 2003, 04:11:18 PM »
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Oh bah... I hate all the 'depressed' kids who think ACO is awesome cause of all the violence.

Someone told me a story once of one of their friends saying something like, "Hey I started a group of people called THE DROOGS!"

Ugh. So annoying.

eward

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« Reply #69 on: August 15, 2003, 10:37:10 PM »
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dr. strangelove all the way baby.  with a clockwork orange and eyes wide shut following closely..........

Jeremy Blackman

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« Reply #70 on: August 15, 2003, 11:06:19 PM »
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2001...

There's nothing like it. In my mind, it's the purest piece of cinematic art.

But I can't get over Full Metal Jacket... it's close.
"Hunger is the purest sin"

Pubrick

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« Reply #71 on: August 16, 2003, 01:34:19 AM »
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2001 was the greatest thing he did for humanity, so of course it will be praised for centuries to come..

but the shining is the greatest thing he did for himself, really now, it's incredible. especially after the Barry Lyndon flop. sure everyone went to see it cos of Jack, and that's still the only selling point.. but visually he was never more bold. thematically he took the subject of fear and ripped it the fuck up through The Uncanny (Freudian) and dark history.. the shining covers all the human mindscape that 2001 sacrificed for heavenly transcendence.

JB, u might like FMJ for similar reasons.. they hav much in common, in urs it's Jungian duality. i think the shining is very much a sleep-and-i-can't-wake-up situation, FMJ an awake-and-i-can't-stop-dreamin steez. the breakdown of pyle is like Jack's, if u can imagine Joker as jack's other (living) half, u'll see the echo of pyle resonate in his head all the way past his mercy killing to the eerily familiar ending of a disembodied entity singing a song of yesteryear.
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Jeremy Blackman

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« Reply #72 on: August 16, 2003, 06:07:15 PM »
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Quote from: P
the shining covers all the human mindscape that 2001 sacrificed for heavenly transcendence.


I'm convinced... I'll have to check it out again... For some reason (although I love the movie) it's always the one that I never get very attached to...

Quote from: P
JB, u might like FMJ for similar reasons.. they hav much in common, in urs it's Jungian duality.


Absolutely...  :shock: ...

A little careless of me not to look for the same level of meaning in The Shining.

I'm really curious to know what you'd think of some of his really early stuff, like The Killing & Killer's Kiss...
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Pubrick

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« Reply #73 on: August 19, 2003, 08:04:22 AM »
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I'm really curious to know what you'd think of some of his really early stuff, like The Killing & Killer's Kiss...

they hav many similarities, not the least of which is that in both films plans are ruined/complicated by sluts.

seriously tho, killer's kiss is alright, structurally he does wonderful things with what coulda been a simple plan-gone-wrong story. the big weakness is the ending, and generally crummy acting. it's clear he was just messing around with what the camera and editing could do, one big dance around his true (future) intentions. culminating in that flashback within a flashback where ruth sobotka is doing her ballet. the end is just pussywhipped, and he wishes it did feel right but he knows and makes us know it really doesn't, even tho it appears fine.

the killing, 'what a ripper', as aussies would say. kubrick has always been intrigued by time, again he plays with it in a similar convoluted way as killer's kiss. but now intentions and moments match perfectly, he hits all the right notes and the ending is totally the opposite of killer's kiss. just grim reality, the end of the road, very much a "now" moment.

and i havn't seen fear and desire but i can imagine it's amateur hour. i think about his napoleon project and how ironic it is that he never got it made. it woulda been the ultimate kubrick film, encompassing everything he ever did full circle. as it stands, he did finish on a fresh patch, that's good enuff for me.
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Jensen Briggs

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« Reply #74 on: August 19, 2003, 11:04:03 PM »
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I rented 2001 once and got so bored I fell asleep.

And...psha...A Clockwork Orange wasn't violent enough, sunshine.
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