Author Topic: clean flicks  (Read 12797 times)

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Pubrick

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clean flicks
« Reply #45 on: March 03, 2003, 03:51:43 AM »
0
Quote from: Duck Sauce
It is sort of entertaining, btw that article is worth the look just for the pictures.

i dunno, i saw some of their fansites with even hotter pictures and.. damn, i guess most ppl don't get to do chicks while they're this age. i guess that's why.
under the paving stones.

xerxes

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clean flicks
« Reply #46 on: March 03, 2003, 07:49:18 PM »
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saw them on tv today... they sure do like to make-out don't they???

MacGuffin

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clean flicks
« Reply #47 on: April 18, 2004, 12:22:09 PM »
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DVD player can excise sex, violence, language
Wal-Mart and Kmart will sell a filtering RCA machine, but directors' guild objects. From Associated Press

People wanting to automatically mute the foul language in "Seabiscuit" or skip the violence in "The Patriot" have a new option: a DVD player from RCA that filters content deemed objectionable.

Thomson, which owns the RCA brand, will sell the players in some Wal-Mart and Kmart stores as well as on Wal-Mart's website starting this month even as the filtering software they employ faces a legal challenge from Hollywood.

The filtering software is from ClearPlay, which had offered it previously for watching DVDs on computers and began talking to RCA last year about a stand-alone player.

The partners are hoping the current stir over broadcast decency, spurred by Janet Jackson's breast-baring Super Bowl show, will help boost sales.

The DVD player carries a suggested retail price of $79 and will ship with 100 filters for movies such as "Daredevil" and "Pirates of the Caribbean."

Filters for newer releases are available each week through a monthly subscription of $4.95.

The Directors Guild of America contends that "it is a violation of law and just wrong to profit from selling software that changes the intent of movies you didn't create and don't own."

The DGA and studios filed suit in 2002 against ClearPlay and a Colorado store that uses its own software to decode a DVD, alter it for content, then burn a new, edited version back onto a DVD for rental. The lawsuit is still pending.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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molly

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clean flicks
« Reply #48 on: April 18, 2004, 12:44:49 PM »
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Quote from: RegularKarate
Quote from: cbrad4d
I really don't understand this, what is going on? Explain more?


Some jackasses are cutting movies to shit then renting and/or selling them as "clean" versions.  Now there's a lawsuit about it and the companies are bitching that they have the right to do this.


i interested to see what kind of people ENJOY watching those masacred movies. Do they stare at the TV, just to say:I've see von Trier, he is my favourite director. I'm nice and smart person who is interested in art and sport. blahblah...

Ravi

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clean flicks
« Reply #49 on: April 18, 2004, 04:42:34 PM »
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If you want a clean movie, rent The Straight Story instead of trying to edit Austin Powers 2 or something.

MacGuffin

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clean flicks
« Reply #50 on: March 09, 2005, 05:08:57 PM »
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Congressional DVD Family Filter Bill Moves

A bill that would let parents and children filter the curse words, sex scenes and violence out of movie DVDs moved closer to approval by Congress on Wednesday.

The House Judiciary Committee on voice vote gave the legislation its endorsement, sending it to the full House.

The Senate passed the bill earlier this year. If representatives now pass it without changes, it would go to President Bush for his signature.

The legislation was introduced because Hollywood studios and directors had sued to stop the makers and distributors of technology for DVD players that would skip movie scenes deemed offensive. The movies' creators had argued that changing the content would violate their copyrights.

But the legislation would create an exemption in the copyright laws to make sure companies that offer the technology like ClearPlay, a Salt Lake City business, won't get sued out of existence.

"These days, I don't think anyone would even consider buying a DVD player that doesn't come with a remote control," said Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas. "Yet there are some who would deny parents the right to use an equivalent electronic device to protect their children from offensive material."

In addition, the bill, called the Family Entertainment and Copyright Act, would create new penalties for criminals who use small videocameras to record and sell bootlegged copies of first-run films.

If the bill becomes law, people convicted of using cameras to bootleg movies could face as much as three years in federal prison plus fines, with the sentence doubling to six years upon a second conviction.

It also would reauthorize a Library of Congress program dedicated to saving rare, culturally significant works.

"The films saved by the program do not enjoy the protection of big studios," said Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. "Rather, the act will help to preserve avant-garde works, home movies, silent-era films, and other treasures that shed a great deal of light on America's past."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Two Lane Blacktop

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clean flicks
« Reply #51 on: March 09, 2005, 05:33:33 PM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
Congressional DVD Family Filter Bill Moves
"These days, I don't think anyone would even consider buying a DVD player that doesn't come with a remote control," said Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas. "Yet there are some who would deny parents the right to use an equivalent electronic device to protect their children from offensive material."


Fucking idiot.   :hammer:

If parents were actually watching the movies with their kids, and using the remote to skip scenes they didn't want the kids to see, nobody would want a DVD player that makes those decisions for you.  

Of course, I wouldn't expect our current government to have any respect for the rights of an artist.  They just scream "What about the children?" and draw over the art with a black magic marker.  

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MacGuffin

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Re: clean flicks
« Reply #52 on: July 09, 2006, 03:47:54 PM »
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Court rules against sanitizing films

Sanitizing movies on DVD or VHS tape violates federal copyright laws, and several companies that scrub films must turn over their inventory to Hollywood studios, an appeals judge ruled.

Editing movies to delete objectionable language, sex and violence is an "illegitimate business" that hurts Hollywood studios and directors who own the movie rights, said U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch in a decision released Thursday in Denver.

"Their (studios and directors) objective ... is to stop the infringement because of its irreparable injury to the creative artistic expression in the copyrighted movies," the judge wrote. "There is a public interest in providing such protection."

Matsch ordered the companies named in the suit, including CleanFlicks, Play It Clean Video and CleanFilms, to stop "producing, manufacturing, creating" and renting edited movies. The businesses also must turn over their inventory to the movie studios within five days of the ruling.

"We're disappointed," CleanFlicks chief executive Ray Lines said. "This is a typical case of David vs. Goliath, but in this case, Hollywood rewrote the ending. We're going to continue to fight."

CleanFlicks produces and distributes sanitized copies of Hollywood films on DVD by burning edited versions of movies onto blank discs. The scrubbed films are sold over the Internet and to video stores.

As many as 90 video stores nationwide — about half of them in Utah — purchase movies from CleanFlicks, Lines said. It's unclear how the ruling may effect those stores.

The controversy began in 1998 when the owners of Sunrise Family Video began deleting scenes from "Titanic" that showed a naked Kate Winselt.

The scrubbing caused an uproar in Hollywood, resulting in several lawsuits and countersuits.

Directors can feel vindicated by the ruling, said Michael Apted, president of the Director's Guild of America.

"Audiences can now be assured that the films they buy or rent are the vision of the filmmakers who made them and not the arbitrary choices of a third-party editor," he said.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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squints

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Re: clean flicks
« Reply #53 on: July 09, 2006, 04:47:35 PM »
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Hooray!
“The myth by no means finds its adequate objectification in the spoken word. The structure of the scenes and the visible imagery reveal a deeper wisdom than the poet himself is able to put into words and concepts” – Friedrich Nietzsche

MacGuffin

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Re: clean flicks
« Reply #54 on: September 27, 2006, 02:08:14 PM »
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A Legal Way To Censor Movies?

San Francisco-based Cuts Inc. has unveiled a software product, which it is offering free, that will allow individuals to censor their own movies "legally." In a statement, the company said, "With the Cuts Player and Cuts' online Directory service, users can post their own edits, as well as navigate through a variety of categories and lists of popular Cuts made by others." What makes the system legal, the company claims, "is that the edits people make never alter the original video. Instead, Cuts generates a set of instructions, called 'Cutlists', which implement the edits on the fly any time the video is played back with the Cuts Player software. Viewers must have the original video in order to view the edited version." In July, a court ruled against CleanFlicks, a company that edited DVDs to remove sex scenes and bad language on the grounds that it caused "irreparable injury to the creative artistic expression in the copyrighted movies."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: clean flicks
« Reply #55 on: May 21, 2013, 07:10:30 AM »
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“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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