Author Topic: DGA Nominations  (Read 2102 times)

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MacGuffin

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DGA Nominations
« on: January 21, 2003, 03:50:28 PM »
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Oscar hopes continued to shine bright for Golden Globe winners Chicago and The Hours as the directors for both those films – Rob Marshall and Stephen Daldry, respectively – were nominated today for this year's Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Feature Film; it was the first DGA nomination for both directors. Previous DGA nominees Peter Jackson (The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers), Roman Polanski (The Pianist) and Martin Scorsese (Gangs of New York) – none of whom have ever won -- rounded out the nominees for the award, which is considered to be one of the most reliable harbingers for an Oscar win. Only five times since the award's inception has the winner of the DGA award not gone on to win the Best Director Oscar, with the most recent incident occurring in 2000, when Steven Soderbergh (Traffic) bested DGA winner Ang Lee (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) for the Academy Award. Surprise omissions this year included Todd Haynes (Far From Heaven), Alexander Payne (About Schmidt) and Spike Jonze (Adaptation); Jonze had received a previous DGA nomination for 1999's Being John Malkovich.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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DGA Nominations
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2003, 11:43:04 AM »
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It'll be Polanski live, via satellite, at DGA

He may be a fugitive from American justice, but director Roman Polanski plans to put in an appearance in Beverly Hills on Saturday -- sort of.

Polanski, an Oscar nominee for "The Pianist," has agreed to appear via satellite hookup from France for a panel discussion featuring all five contenders for the Directors Guild of America's top feature film award. Expected to attend in person are Stephen Daldry of "The Hours," Peter Jackson of "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers," Rob Marshall of "Chicago" and Martin Scorsese of "Gangs of New York."

The symposium is a regular annual event at the DGA in West Hollywood, where the guild's nominees hold a freewheeling discussion of their movies and the techniques they employed.

The DGA awards dinner will follow later that night at the Century Plaza Hotel and, judging by the list of presenters, the paparazzi will be out in force. Scheduled presenters include George Clooney, Salma Hayek, Daniel Day-Lewis, Julianne Moore and Renée Zellweger.

It promises to be a big night for Scorsese, who in addition to being a DGA nominee this year, is also receiving the guild's life achievement award from previous recipient Steven Spielberg.

Only five times since 1948 has the winner of the DGA award for feature film directing not gone on to win an Oscar. The most recent was Ang Lee for "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," who won the DGA award but then lost out at the Oscars to Steven Soderbergh for "Traffic."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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©brad

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DGA Nominations
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2003, 12:33:28 PM »
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Anyone know if this airs in England, what time and channel?

Victor

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DGA Nominations
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2003, 05:12:53 PM »
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yo if snoop had da balls to show up at the VMAs wit da po-pos on his ass, that motherfucker polanski shud at least show up in disguise, knawhimsayin?
are you gonna eat with us too?

MacGuffin

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DGA Nominations
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2003, 02:04:10 AM »
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'Chicago' Director Wins Top Guild Award



Freshman moviemaker Rob Marshall razzle-dazzled the Directors Guild of America with his musical "Chicago" Saturday night, claiming the group's top honor and defeating veteran directors Martin Scorsese and Roman Polanski.

In the 55 years since the guild began presenting its top honor, the winner has gone on to receive the Academy Award for best director all but five times.

Marshall, 42, a Tony-winning Broadway director and choreographer, appeared as shaken as he was grateful after claiming the award. "This is something I didn't quite expect," he said backstage, describing the experience as "overwhelming."

Asked where he was going to place the trophy, a gold-plated disc about the size of a serving dish, Marshall replied: "I'm going to have to get another apartment in New York. It's huge!"

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Polanski Speaks Via Satellite at DGAs

In a rare public appearance, fugitive filmmaker Roman Polanski told a group of Hollywood directors via satellite Saturday that his Holocaust drama "The Pianist" was a way to show how the pursuit of art can overcome life's horrors.

"I wanted to show survival is ... (connected to) those positive forces that surround us," he said. "In this case, the music and art, which help someone go through difficult, sometimes the greatest, adversities."

Despite awards recognition for "The Pianist," including Oscar bids for best picture and director, Polanski has given few interviews and done little to promote the film to U.S. audiences.

"The Pianist," the true story of a classically trained musician hiding from Nazis in the ruins of Poland, echoes elements of Polanski's own life, when he escaped from Krakow's Jewish ghetto as a child and lived off the charity of strangers until reuniting with his father years later. His mother died at Auschwitz.

"Obviously, the whole film is about survival," Polanski said, speaking from an office in Paris. "For me it was the preponderant theme of my childhood and youth ..."

Panel moderator Jeremy Kagan, an Emmy-winning television director, told Polanski that he believed the main character in "The Pianist" "transcends, in the end, the issues of politics and the issues of right or wrong just to still be able to make art."

Polanski said doing research for "The Pianist" in the preproduction phase was the most difficult part for him because he was confronted again with the kind of Nazi atrocities he witnessed as a boy.

Faced with directing hundreds of background actors made to look like refugees, the director said, "It looked so real I would have to pinch myself to say, 'It's only a movie.'"
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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