Author Topic: Future Tarantino: Where it's never gonna happen, but we hope that it does(n't).  (Read 48022 times)

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Alexandro

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it just that there wasn't enough commitment with it. the doesn't sound like quentin tarantino at all. it sounds like a guy paraphrasing him.

©brad

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Re: Future Tarantino: Where it's never gonna happen, but we hope that it does(n
« Reply #151 on: September 11, 2009, 02:38:14 PM »
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Well I found it funny.  :elitist:

Alexandro

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 :shock:

polkablues

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Re: Future Tarantino: Where it's never gonna happen, but we hope that it does(n
« Reply #153 on: September 12, 2009, 01:26:11 AM »
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It was kind of lazy, but it was funny. I didn't LOL, but I did LQOTI.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

modage

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Abandoned Tarantino Babies? The Little Quentin Movies That Never Happened
Source: The Playlist

Though nearly ever filmmaker has a laundry list of movies-that-never-happened under their belt, it's Quentin Tarantino who seems to spend as much time (who are we kidding, more time) discussing and building up a list of movies-that-will-never-happen as he does actually making movies.

Last week, while discussing the "Kill Bill" sequels-that-may-never happen, Variety decided to make a list of some of the abandoned Tarantino babies. While the article briefly touches on various aspects of the laundry list of forgotten projects, we've made a more complete rundown of some of the Tarantino films that never were (and will probably never be):

“Double V Vega” aka “Vega Brothers” — The long-in-gestation prequel to both “Reservoir Dogs” and “Pulp Fiction,” would have followed the exploits of Vic (Michael Madsen) and Vincent Vega (John Travolta) during the latter’s time in Amsterdam. Tarantino held a torch for this project for years—even during press for “Kill Bill,” he claimed it was still very much a possibility. In a 2007 interview with "Opie & Anthony," he said he briefly considered making it a sequel (?!), “I actually came up with a way I could have done it, even being older and dead where they all had older brothers and both of their brothers got together because the two guys died. And they wanted revenge or something like that. But now, [the actors] are too old for that.” He concluded by finally admitting “it’s kind of unlikely now.”

“40 Lashes Less One” & More Elmore Leonard — After the success of “Pulp Fiction,” Tarantino reportedly asked the Weinsteins to buy the rights to several novels by the “filet of the crime genre,” Elmore Leonard for potential future projects: "Rum Punch" (made into “Jackie Brown”), "Killshot" (made into a terrible direct-to-video movie this year, with QT’s “executive producer” credit removed), "Bandits," "Freaky Deaky" and one of Leonard’s westerns, the 1972 novel, "40 Lashes Less One." The book concerns two prisoners — an Apache and a black former soldier — who, while on death row, are given a chance to be set free if they can hunt down and kill the five worst outlaws in the west (shades of “Kill Bill”). In 2000, some news outlets reported Tarantino was clandestinely making the film in Mexico, and in May 2001, a vague post on QT’s former writing partner Roger Avary’s blog led people to think the film would be playing at Cannes. However, Cannes came and there was no sign of any Tarantino film. Soon the call came from his people to confirm that there was no such film in the works. In 2007, the man himself said he now owns the rights, had completed 20 pages of a script, and “still might do it sometime.” Of this list, it’s the most likely to happen — but still highly unlikely, especially after Tarantino's recent claim on Charlie Rose that he will never direct another adaptation having felt in retrospect, slightly emotionally removed from "Jackie Brown" because it was not his own original work. It's similar to "Kill Bill" territory, but dunno, if he tackled this in say, 10 years? We wouldn't complain.

James Bond Project (“Casino Royale”) — Back before Americans knew the name Daniel Craig, Tarantino (as he has been reminding us lately) had the idea to go back and do a “small-scale, plot-driven” take on the only Ian Fleming novel that hadn’t been properly adapted into a James Bond feature — “Casino Royale.” The biggest difference between his take and the final Martin Campbell version was casting: QT was dead-set on keeping Pierce Brosnan as Bond. Tarantino hasn't kept a straight story about why the film never happened: in 2005, he claimed it was because of the producers dumping Brosnan, but in 2007, he claimed producers were "'afraid [Tarantino was] going to make it too good and f**k the rest of the series.' " He also basically has said that the producers stole his idea to retell, "Casino Royale." Suffice to say there was some bad blood here and his chance at Bond has probably come and gone.

“The Psychic” (Lucio Fulci remake) — A remake of the ‘70s Italian psychological horror film about a clairvoyant woman, inspired by visions, who smashes open a section of wall in her husband's home and finds a skeleton behind it...was an idea QT bandied about with "Jackie Brown" star Bridget Fonda. In an interview with AICN back in 2000, Tarantino talked about the project’s status, “It’s a project in the murky future. I don’t even own the rights to that stuff. It’s one of those things where it’s like if somebody buys the rights to make it, I won’t make it. They can totally fuck it up. If it’s meant to happen, it’ll happen.” Since it’s been almost ten years, we’re going to assume it wasn’t meant to happen.

“The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” — A feature adaptation of the James Bond-ish ‘60s spy series starring Robert Vaughn was one of a few blockbuster-style projects Tarantino was offered in his three years of downtime following the success of 'Pulp.' While he eventually turned them all down, it sounds like he may have briefly entertained the idea of making “U.N.C.L.E.,” later saying he thought of casting George Clooney in the lead role of Napoleon Solo and himself as Ilya Kuryakin. Instead, he and Clooney teamed up for "From Dusk Til Dawn" and Tarantino made "Jackie Brown" his next project, but clearly the spy genre is one that interests him and is one he may still venture into one day.

“Modesty Blaise” — An adaptation of the comic strip/adventure novel character starring an exceptional young woman with many talents and a criminal past (it's a bit 'Bourne' like, she's an amnesiac), Tarantino has reportedly been interested in bringing “Modesty” to the big screen for some time (John Travolta's character reads it on the toilet right before he gets shot in "Pulp Fiction"). Neil Gaiman at one point was commissioned to write a treatment for the project based on the I, Lucifer novel — whether this was at the instruction of QT or not is unclear. So far, the closest he’s come is sponsoring old friend Scott Speigel’s direct-to-video adaptation 2004’s “Quentin Tarantino Presents: My Name is Modesty.”

“Ultimate Jason Voorhees Movie” — Back in 2005, two years after New Line had a hit with “Freddy Vs. Jason” and failed to get “Freddy Vs. Jason Vs. Ash” off the ground, there were reports that Tarantino was meeting with the studio about writing, directing and possibly starring in what was dubbed “The Ultimate Jason Voorhees Movie.” Though the announcement caused much jeans creaming in the horror fanboy community, the project unsurprisingly never came to fruition—Tarantino made “Grindhouse” instead.

And these are just the ones we consider dead and gone — it seems like every other time Tarantino gives an interview, we hear about a new project he'd like to tackle, whether it be the the 1930s gangster picture, the western, the "southern," Klux Klux Klan revenge tale the Len Deighton British spy novels, the "Basterds" prequels/sequels, or the John Brown slavery biopic. Frankly, if it's between another "Kill Bill" installment (which, frighteningly enough, seems to be where his focus is at the moment) and any of these, we'd go for the latter — especially the British spy novels. Tarantino has shown a real affinity for the British spy genre, both with his Bond bid and the Archie Hicox plotline in "Inglourious Basterds," thought we only really just got a taste. If there's a genre we'd like to see him revive/rip off, it's this one (especially if Simon Pegg is involved). If you're unfamiliar with the British spy genre — which, while it isn't entirely removed from American spy films, has its own unique conventions that make it that much better— Netfllix "The Ipcress File" (another Deighton adaptation), "The Spy Who Came In From The Cold" or "The Small Back Room" and get educated. Either that or something on racism in America as the Klan/Slavery and '40 Lashes' book all seem to center on similar themes that are preoccupying the director; none of which he has yet explored.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

modage

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Ha ha, never going to happen.

Quentin Tarantino Will Reportedly Go Medieval On Helen Mirren
Source: MTVMovies

Calm down. Don't read into that headline too much. The news is actually much tamer than the reference to a classic "Pulp Fiction" quote would have you believe.

Oscar winner Helen Mirren has been approached by "Inlgourious Basterds" director Quentin Tarantino to play a role in his next movie. That's the word from UK tabloid The Sun (via DigitalSpy) who, to be fair, don't have the best track record with these sorts of rumors.

The anonymous source told The Sun that this Tarantino project "will feature his trademarks - bloody violence and foul language," and will be set during England's Middle Ages. The source goes on to say that "Helen has never worked with Tarantino and is interested. If the film goes into production it's likely she will play a part." Not exactly confirmation, but a tantalizing possibility for Tarantino fans.

The "Inglourious Basterds" filmmaker recently told us that he's "one movie away" from the long-rumored "Kill Bill" sequel (which would obviously need a new title). This medieval tale certainly fits the bill of not-a-"Kill Bill"-sequel, so there certainly could be truth to the possibility.

Tarantino is currently busy at Sundance, but MTV has reached out to Mirren's people for comment. Stay tuned to MTV Movies Blog for more info when we have it. For now, just be excited that you Tarantino fans can now pin your hopes some something, even if it is an anonymous rumor.

Would you like to see Tarantino literally go medieval on his next project? What sort of role might be right for Mirren, other than queen?
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

picolas

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Re: Future Tarantino: Where it's never gonna happen, but we hope that it does(n
« Reply #156 on: January 25, 2010, 03:58:57 PM »
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you can't "literally" go medieval.. get your research straight.. fucker

matt35mm

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I suppose he can "literarilly" go medieval.  Except that that's not a real word, as far as I know.

But I did do some research and found, interestingly enough, that there are two definitions of "literally," the second of which means "in effect."  I just found that interesting because I always thought that "literally" meant exact and without exaggeration.  Now I see that it's valid, although generally unnecessary, to say something like, "I was literally about to explode."

Now I can be a jerk to the jerk who likes to correct people on the usage of the word!  I'll say: "No, it's not incorrect; just unnecessary.  Like your face.  Literally."  And then that person may actually explode.

MacGuffin

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And then that person may actually explode.

In a literal hurt locker.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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picolas

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Re: Future Tarantino: Where it's never gonna happen, but we hope that it does(n
« Reply #159 on: January 25, 2010, 04:57:17 PM »
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But I did do some research and found, interestingly enough, that there are two definitions of "literally," the second of which means "in effect."  I just found that interesting because I always thought that "literally" meant exact and without exaggeration.  Now I see that it's valid, although generally unnecessary, to say something like, "I was literally about to explode."
okay. webster's has officially folded to stupid people then. the only reason that definition is there is because the word is being so rampantly misused. there is no way that's always been the definition, and i will never accept it.

Gold Trumpet

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Won't happen, but I wouldn't mind this film being made. Historical films of these ilk are always too nice to the sordid details of their time periods - even when they are supposed to be about bloody times. It would be interesting to see a film veer to the left of classical convention the way Roman Polanski did with his Macbeth, by making something bloodier and more outrageous. Tarantino's personal indiscretion's could have more purpose here.

MacGuffin

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Quentin Tarantino: Brad Pitt does not smoke pot while acting; I don't smoke while directing
Source: NYMag
 
Quentin Tarantino and Brad Pitt like their reefer -- but Tarantino swears neither was high while shooting "Inglourious Basterds." "Brad doesn't smoke while he's acting," Quentin told us at a Thursday lunch celebrating his film's Oscar nominations. "And I don't smoke while I'm directing." However, he achieved his riotous masterwork, more than a few handicappers think the "Basterds" could ambush the Best Picture chances of "Avatar" and "Hurt Locker." (The flick's SAG win suggests Academy actors will compensate Tarantino for "Pulp Fiction" being robbed of its gold in '95.) Next up for Tarantino? "I'd like to do a Western. But rather than set it in Texas, have it in slavery times. With that subject that everybody is afraid to deal with. Let's shine that light on ourselves. You could do a ponderous history lesson of slaves escaping on the Underground Railroad. Or, you could make a movie that would be exciting. Do it as an adventure. A spaghetti Western that takes place during that time. And I would call it 'A Southern.'"
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Stefen

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Dr. Phil is going to take away Brad's kids if he's smoking reefer because it can lead to child molesting and abuse.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.

matt35mm

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Re: Future Tarantino: Where it's never gonna happen, but we hope that it does(n
« Reply #163 on: February 15, 2010, 07:26:58 PM »
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Dr. Phil is going to take away Brad's kids if he's smoking reefer because it can lead to child molesting and abuse.

Oh, you naive soul. What do you think they got those kids for in the first place?

Gamblour.

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Tarantino's idea of A Southern may be the best thing I've heard him say.
WWPTAD?

 

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