Author Topic: The Aviator  (Read 63110 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

cine

  • Pretttttyyy, Pretttyyyyy Pretty Good
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 5553
  • Respect: +283
The Aviator
« Reply #210 on: December 17, 2004, 12:53:25 AM »
0
Quote from: Bethie
Oh yeah, Friday Dec. 17(tonight) on TCM they're showing a show on Howard Hughes: His women and his movies. 8-9pm.

I heard you were taping that too....

modage

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 10836
  • Respect: +806
    • Floating Heads
The Aviator
« Reply #211 on: December 17, 2004, 09:44:33 AM »
0
also SNEAK PREVIEWS (i assume nationwide) this saturday.  (i cant go though.)  :(
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

analogzombie

  • The Meeting with the Goddess
  • ***
  • Posts: 346
  • Respect: +2
    • unrelenting force
The Aviator
« Reply #212 on: December 17, 2004, 11:39:15 AM »
0
I think when Clint Eastwood beats Scorsese out of his Oscar this year Scorsese should rush the stage and shoot himself in the head on live TV. Or better, become a weird recluse and make period viking porn.
"I have love to give, I just don't know where to put it."

Alexandro

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Respect: +504
The Aviator
« Reply #213 on: December 17, 2004, 12:54:59 PM »
0
Quote from: analogzombie
I think when Clint Eastwood beats Scorsese out of his Oscar this year Scorsese should rush the stage and shoot himself in the head on live TV. Or better, become a weird recluse and make period viking porn.



Yeah that could happen...

I mean, I'm pretty sure the academy would give a second oscar to eastwood before giving one to scorsese...for some reason they just don't seem to like him...


and marty will stand up inmediately and applaud, and the feeling i get is he's going to be sincere...after gangs i think, he really doesn't care anymore about the oscars...

cine

  • Pretttttyyy, Pretttyyyyy Pretty Good
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 5553
  • Respect: +283
The Aviator
« Reply #214 on: December 17, 2004, 01:22:53 PM »
0
You're just saying that cause your name is Alexandro.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +643
The Aviator
« Reply #215 on: December 17, 2004, 01:45:23 PM »
0
Quote from: Alexandro
after gangs i think, he really doesn't care anymore about the oscars...


That's not what he said on Oprah. Paraphasing: She asked him if he was "pissed" that he hasn't received an Oscar yet. He said, he wasn't pissed, but disappointed. But then he continued by saying that he's grateful that he's making the movies he wants to make, and that that's more important to him.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

Alexandro

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Respect: +504
The Aviator
« Reply #216 on: December 17, 2004, 01:52:14 PM »
0
Yeah, but it's like when you really want a girl and she never likes you back and you try and you try and you suffer but then one day you say:

"you know what?? i'm done with this, i'm more happy without it"...and you go on and you're not really pissed at the stupid bitch, right?

eward

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 3160
  • Respect: +227
The Aviator
« Reply #217 on: December 17, 2004, 03:01:09 PM »
0
Quote from: MacGuffin
Quote from: Alexandro
after gangs i think, he really doesn't care anymore about the oscars...


That's not what he said on Oprah. Paraphasing: She asked him if he was "pissed" that he hasn't received an Oscar yet. He said, he wasn't pissed, but disappointed. But then he continued by saying that he's grateful that he's making the movies he wants to make, and that that's more important to him.


did she say "pissed" because spielberg said he was "pissed" for not winning after color purple on her show in like 97?
"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

"No, I don't even laugh at seasickness! I happen to regard jealousy as the seasickness of passion."

samsong

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1287
  • Respect: +288
    • http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.html?cat=1&sub=All&id=samsong
The Aviator
« Reply #218 on: December 19, 2004, 02:13:25 AM »
0
A little too sterile and conventional for this to be considered a great Scorsese picture, but The Aviator is a very good film.  Leonardo DiCaprio, who I had no faith in, pulls off the Scorsesian hero with great charisma and range, and, as all of us knew before this film was even made, Cate Blanchett is stellar as Katherine Hepburn.  Scorsese draws a lot of parallels between Howard Hughes and Charles Foster Kane (which if you weren't able to pick up off of the trailer, you probably should never go to another movie again), an almost euphoric experience for me -- it's fascinating to see Scorsese deal so directly with one of his and American cinema's biggest influences.  

"Full review sometime in the future."

Go see it.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +643
The Aviator
« Reply #219 on: December 21, 2004, 02:27:13 PM »
0
Quote from: Alexandro
anyway, just a little thought...and this coming from one of the biggest of scrosese's fans, but shouldn't a director be judged also because of his reliability with budgets?? isn't that a little, kind of like, part of the job too??

i mean marty has consistenly gone way over budget with a bunch of his films...he did it with casino, and kundun if i remember correctly, he did it with gangs and now with this!!!!

i mean, if i were him, and half of hollywood is claiming that i just misfired completely with Gangs of New York, and they nominate my nmovie for ten oscars and give me shit, and all I wanna do is being able to work again (as he said), not in a million years I would go over budget with an already pretty expensive film like The Aviator. I would just find a way around a problem instead of asking for some more money...


Without Graham King, 'Aviator' wouldn't fly
Largely unknown outside of the insular world of film industry foreign sales, the British businessman has quietly emerged as the new king of Hollywood high rollers. Source: Los Angeles Times



When Leonardo DiCaprio arrived in Japan to promote the opening of "Gangs of New York" in November 2002, the handsome young star was greeted by thousands of screaming fans, who broke through barricades and might have smothered him with adulation if security hadn't kept them at a safe distance. Watching the surging crowd of kids, hardly attracting a glance, was a burly man who would look right at home playing a vigilant bodyguard in a British gangster movie.

Largely unknown outside of the insular world of film industry foreign sales, Graham King has quietly emerged as the new king of Hollywood high rollers, having provided the key foreign financing for a series of risky high-profile projects that might never have gone before the cameras without his support. In fact, while DiCaprio and "Gangs" director Martin Scorsese were in Japan, King put them to work selling his next picture. Knowing both men were longing to make "The Aviator," which goes into wide release this weekend, King had DiCaprio and Scorsese woo a leading Japanese film investor, touting the saga of Howard Hughes, the test-pilot daredevil who built an aviation empire while romancing every Hollywood starlet in the phonebook.

By the time DiCaprio and Scorsese finished their pitch, King had a sale, pocketing a $13-million commitment for the Japanese distribution rights to "Aviator." King was responsible for roughly $80 million of the film's $116-million budget, with the rest of the backing coming from Miramax and Warner Bros. With so much money on the line, "Aviator" represents King's biggest bet yet. For all the press attention that's been focused on the fractious relationship between Scorsese and Miramax czar Harvey Weinstein, Weinstein was largely in the background on "Aviator" — it's King who put in most of the money and spent every day on the set, keeping an eye on his investment. Old Hollywood hands, knowing that Scorsese has gone over budget on virtually every movie he's made, predicted doom, figuring the cagey director would walk all over the neophyte producer. "When I told people I was doing 'Aviator' with Marty right after 'Gangs,' everyone said to me, 'Have you lost your mind?' " King recalls.

Although he admits to popping a few Ambiens along the way, the 43-year-old producer kept the movie from spiraling out of control. "For 91 days, all Marty heard me say was how much this movie was costing," explains King, who retains the cockney accent of his old London neighborhood. "Before we started, I told Marty, 'We have a schedule of 91 days, and if that's not realistic, tell me now, because if we go to 115 days, it could put me out of business. And if I go down, we all go down."

Newcomers to Hollywood often go down for the count. Early on in "The Aviator," we see Hughes buttonhole MGM mogul Louis B. Mayer, wanting to borrow a couple of cameras to supplement the 24 cameras he already has filming the aerial scenes of his epic "Hell's Angels." Mayer turns him down, telling him to go back home, saying 'You'll go broke here.' " King has heard such advice many times himself. Over the years, countless outside investors have crashed and burned, betting on too many bad movies and blowing too much cash on private jets and posh parties.

Still, King has earned considerable goodwill, largely because he is one of the few risk-takers left willing to back artistically ambitious projects. "Graham's movies all display a pattern," says Jim Gianopulos, co-chairman of 20th Century Fox. "They are films that for one reason or another, studios would've been very nervous about financing themselves, but they're made by gifted filmmakers with a vision Graham trusted. What he's really doing is taking the creative risk on the film, which is often what you have to do to make a great picture."

In today's Hollywood, risk is a dirty word. At most studios, ambitious projects are a rare luxury, elbowed aside by a flood of easy-to-market special-effects thrillers. The few Oscar-worthy films released by studios are invariably made with the help of independent investors — according to Forbes, studios rely on outside partners for 75% of the movies they release. 20th Century Fox only made "Master and Commander" after it recruited two other studios to help foot the bill. Despite a three-decade relationship with Clint Eastwood, Warners wouldn't back "Million Dollar Baby" until Lakeshore Entertainment agreed to pay for half the budget.

While everyone else is hedging their bets, King reaches for the sky. "Graham is an old-style entrepreneur who champions films few other people would be willing to make," says Weinstein, who compares him to Sam Spiegel, the impresario who made "On the Waterfront" and "Lawrence of Arabia." King is always searching for an uncut diamond, often an expensive one. In 2000, King put up $40 million of the $55-million budget for Steven Soderbergh's "Traffic," which won four Oscars. He spent $55 million on Michael Mann's "Ali," then wagered $65 million on "Gangs." If "Aviator" is nominated for a best picture Oscar next month, he'll have three best picture nominations in four tries, a feat today's risk-averse studios can only dream about.

At first glance, it's hard to imagine King as a man with poetry in his soul. He grew up in the rough and tumble East End, where his father ran a garage and knew the Krays, the notorious gangsters who ruled '60s-era London. Like many kids his age, King had twin passions — movies and soccer. At lunch one day, he spots a young man wearing an Arsenal T-shirt, prompting an enthusiastic explanation of British soccer rivalries (King's team is Chelsea).

King came to Los Angeles at 19, ostensibly to attend college. He lasted a year before he landed a job in 20th Century Fox's international TV department. His six years there gave him an appreciation for the global marketplace, then a backwater of the business. King eventually opened his own foreign sales firm, Initial Entertainment Group, which has gone through several partners and owners along the way. King was such a small fry that when he offered to pay $65 million to back "Gangs," then-Disney Chairman Joe Roth, who controlled the project, had to call King's banker, John Miller at J.P. Morgan Chase, to check out his credentials.

King doesn't wager all this money himself. He sells the foreign rights to a film country by country, a formula pioneered years ago by Dino De Laurentiis. As King explains: "I greenlight a $100-million movie, but I've sold off the domestic [distribution] rights for 35% [of the budget] and I know I can get 55% [of the budget] from my foreign markets. So before I even shoot one scene, I've got 90% of the film covered. So where's my risk?"

In fact, he has already recouped 95% of his investment in "The Aviator." His risk lies in gambling on one extravaganza at a time. Studios have so many streams of income that they can write off half a dozen failures without blinking an eye. King can survive one bomb, like "Ali," but if he has two in a row, his foreign investors will slip out the back door the next time he comes calling.

A more cautious soul might be content to remake old movies. Not King. When Paramount approached him about partnering on "Alfie" and "The Italian Job," he passed. "I told them, 'No way. Those are classics. If you're going to remake them you better have the goods.' " In order to get access to the best material in town, King has production deals with stars like DiCaprio and Johnny Depp, figuring they'll be magnets for good scripts. It's telling that the upcoming project King is most excited about is "Shantaram," a Depp vehicle based on a semi-autobiographical 944-page novel about an Australian heroin addict who escapes from prison and flees to India, where he becomes a doctor in the Bombay slums and a gun-runner battling Russians in 1980s Afghanistan.

The days when a major studio would finance a project like that are gone. If "Shantaram" gets made, it will be because King raises most of the money. He is still amazed that no studio wanted to make "The Aviator." Before Miramax got involved, the project was turned down everywhere. "They all went 'pass, pass, pass — we don't like it,' and yet they're happy to turn around and greenlight some ordinary action film you could see any day of the week," King says, still sounding slightly incredulous.

Whether it's a great soccer match or an ambitious film, the thrill for King is being in the thick of things. When I first met him, he took great delight in recounting the saga of his first fight with Weinstein, an epic showdown over the rights to a foreign territory for "Gangs" that raged for days on end. Later, when "Gangs" went over budget, Weinstein demanded more money. More shouting ensued, but King stood his ground. Today all seems forgiven — the two men are full of praise for each other.

"At first Harvey was very intimidating. But I stuck to my guns, which is just my personality. Besides, I had to say no with 'Gangs,' " King says with a grin. "I didn't have any more money to give him."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

mutinyco

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1476
  • Respect: +2
    • http://www.crossoverfollowing.com
The Aviator
« Reply #220 on: December 22, 2004, 09:53:37 PM »
0
Scorsese will win. It's the first movie he's done that actually plays like an Oscar picture. He was even-tempered. And he never let his technique get in the way. He let the story tell itself.
"I believe in this, and it's been tested by research: he who fucks nuns will later join the church."

-St. Joe

©brad

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 4564
  • Respect: +256
The Aviator
« Reply #221 on: December 25, 2004, 08:51:32 PM »
0
alright are y'all ready for this shit?

i go to my local shit-aplex (my new name for it now) with my mom to see this movie earlier this evening. we arrived at 4:30 and bought our tickets for the 5:00 show. we purposely got there exceptionally early b/c i was anticipating a large crowd. the line, as it turned out, was unusually meager. we snuck into ocean's 12 for about 20 minutes, then at 4:50 walked into what was now a full theater for the aviator. i found us two seats on the front row (fucking hell) and we waited.

now, it's 5:20, and still, the movie has yet to begin. now, at this local shit-aplex they play these cheesy slides of local business advertisements (i'm sure this is done elsewhere, but i have yet to see it myself at any other theater). at 5:25, finally, this 15 year old kid going nuts in the projection room finally gets the thing going. we all cheer. the trailers begin.

BUT

NO FUCKING SOUND.

we sit through trailers for million dollar baby and the new world w/o any audio. miraculously, just as the ultra-cool aviator title logo comes up, the sound comes. we cheer again.

BUT

ITS WAY TOO FUCKING LOUD.

now guys, i'm 22 years old. i attend concerts, shows, and other events of similar audible loudness on a regular basis. as a film-buff or fan or whatever the hell you want to call it,  i like my movies loud (and my cars fast and beer cold). but this was way beyond any tolerable level i could stand, let alone the near-senile senior citizens that made up the majority of the audience. y'all, i'm taking BALLS-TO-THE-WALLS,-HEAVY-METAL,-TEAR-THE-SKIN-OFF-YOUR-BONE LOUD. after about 15 minutes of this shit, finally someone complains. the sound is finally fixed. we cheer again.

BUT

now the sound is too fucking low!! and these amazing flying sequences i'm seeing are not nearly as impressive as they should be because i can barely hear leo talk, let alone hear the fucking airplane engine roar.

let's all stop here and take a deep breath. :breath: :release:.

NOW

despite all the fuck ups, i am still loving the movie in everyway- leo at his best, scorsese finally gotten back into his game, cate blanchett is a revelation, everything is working, i'm loving it, right?  two and a half hours later, just as mr. hughes is forced to go to that trial thing...

THE MOVIE STOPS.

the audience exploads into a collective roar of frustration.

on screen we're back to the cheesy slides, the first one ironically being "SIT BACK. RELAX. AND ENJOY THE SHOW." we abrupt in angry laughter.

a long 5 minutes go by, and we're off again, finally (by now i'd say at least 10 people had left the theater).

trial ensues for a mere 2 minutes before... you guessed it...

movie stops again.

my patience is now running as thin as possibe, tissue-paper thin.

the 15 year old in the projection room is going nuts, scratching his head, throwing pieces of film around (seriously). a few minutes later, the movie starts...

...then stops yet again for the umteenth time. my mom and i and the majority of the audience leave. the people for the 8:30 show are already impatiently waiting. i already have a cigarette in my mouth as i run-walk to the exit door. my mom is just as mad. we both agree the following; the first two and a half hours were great, the movie theater sucks hairy ass and should be torn down immediately, and we need to injest as much alcohol as humanly possible as soon as possible.

so, um, merry christmas. hope everyone enjoys it as much as i enjoyed the first 3/4ths of it.

eward

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 3160
  • Respect: +227
The Aviator
« Reply #222 on: December 26, 2004, 12:51:07 AM »
0
you missed a powerful goddamn closing scene if you didnt get to finish it.
"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

"No, I don't even laugh at seasickness! I happen to regard jealousy as the seasickness of passion."

SiliasRuby

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 3071
  • Spits Hyperbole Like Nobody's Business
  • Respect: +2
The Aviator
« Reply #223 on: December 26, 2004, 01:32:15 AM »
0
I saw it today, (dec. 25th) and I completely loved it. A total solid scorsese picture and Eward is right Cbrad, you miss a hell of a closing scene. Hopefully you will get the chance to see it again. It really is wonderful.
The Beatles know Jesus Christ has returned to Earth and is in Los Angeles.

When you are getting fucked by the big corporations remember to use a condom.

There was a FISH in the perkalater!!!

My Collection

Pozer

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2289
  • Respect: +143
The Aviator
« Reply #224 on: December 26, 2004, 12:42:08 PM »
0
Quote from: ©brad
alright are y'all ready for this shit?

i go to my local shit-aplex (my new name for it now) with my mom to see this movie earlier this evening. we arrived at 4:30 and bought our tickets for the 5:00 show. we purposely got there exceptionally early b/c i was anticipating a large crowd. the line, as it turned out, was unusually meager. we snuck into ocean's 12 for about 20 minutes, then at 4:50 walked into what was now a full theater for the aviator. i found us two seats on the front row (fucking hell) and we waited.

now, it's 5:20, and still, the movie has yet to begin. now, at this local shit-aplex they play these cheesy slides of local business advertisements (i'm sure this is done elsewhere, but i have yet to see it myself at any other theater). at 5:25, finally, this 15 year old kid going nuts in the projection room finally gets the thing going. we all cheer. the trailers begin.

BUT

NO FUCKING SOUND.

we sit through trailers for million dollar baby and the new world w/o any audio. miraculously, just as the ultra-cool aviator title logo comes up, the sound comes. we cheer again.

BUT

ITS WAY TOO FUCKING LOUD.

now guys, i'm 22 years old. i attend concerts, shows, and other events of similar audible loudness on a regular basis. as a film-buff or fan or whatever the hell you want to call it,  i like my movies loud (and my cars fast and beer cold). but this was way beyond any tolerable level i could stand, let alone the near-senile senior citizens that made up the majority of the audience. y'all, i'm taking BALLS-TO-THE-WALLS,-HEAVY-METAL,-TEAR-THE-SKIN-OFF-YOUR-BONE LOUD. after about 15 minutes of this shit, finally someone complains. the sound is finally fixed. we cheer again.

BUT

now the sound is too fucking low!! and these amazing flying sequences i'm seeing are not nearly as impressive as they should be because i can barely hear leo talk, let alone hear the fucking airplane engine roar.

let's all stop here and take a deep breath. :breath: :release:.

NOW

despite all the fuck ups, i am still loving the movie in everyway- leo at his best, scorsese finally gotten back into his game, cate blanchett is a revelation, everything is working, i'm loving it, right?  two and a half hours later, just as mr. hughes is forced to go to that trial thing...

THE MOVIE STOPS.

the audience exploads into a collective roar of frustration.

on screen we're back to the cheesy slides, the first one ironically being "SIT BACK. RELAX. AND ENJOY THE SHOW." we abrupt in angry laughter.

a long 5 minutes go by, and we're off again, finally (by now i'd say at least 10 people had left the theater).

trial ensues for a mere 2 minutes before... you guessed it...

movie stops again.

my patience is now running as thin as possibe, tissue-paper thin.

the 15 year old in the projection room is going nuts, scratching his head, throwing pieces of film around (seriously). a few minutes later, the movie starts...

...then stops yet again for the umteenth time. my mom and i and the majority of the audience leave. the people for the 8:30 show are already impatiently waiting. i already have a cigarette in my mouth as i run-walk to the exit door. my mom is just as mad. we both agree the following; the first two and a half hours were great, the movie theater sucks hairy ass and should be torn down immediately, and we need to injest as much alcohol as humanly possible as soon as possible.

so, um, merry christmas. hope everyone enjoys it as much as i enjoyed the first 3/4ths of it.

That truly sucks. I found myself feeling really angry on the inside at your theater while I was reading your post because I had a similar experience with The Thin Red Line which doesn't compare to it happening during a film like this. But still, it completely tarnishes an experience you've long been anticipating.

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy