Author Topic: Welles, Orson  (Read 17339 times)

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MacGuffin

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Welles, Orson
« Reply #60 on: March 08, 2004, 09:39:49 PM »
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Judge: Oscar Belongs to Welles' Daughter

LOS ANGELES - The Academy Award presented to Orson Welles for "Citizen Kane" belongs to his daughter, a judge said, ruling against Oscar overseers trying to prevent the sale of the statuette.

U.S. District Court Judge Dean Pregerson ruled in Beatrice Welles' favor, saying the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has no claim to the Oscar awarded to her father for co-writing the screenplay of his 1941 classic. The March 4 ruling was made public Monday.

"Welles has unrestricted property rights in the original Oscar, which she may dispose of however she sees fit," Pregerson wrote.

Her attorney said Monday that Welles plans to sell the Oscar at auction and hopes it will fetch $1 million.

The academy will appeal the ruling, said David Quinto, an attorney for the academy.

Welles had tried to sell the Oscar last year, but Christie's auction house pulled it from a scheduled sale because of the ownership dispute with the academy.

The dispute centered on a right-of-first-refusal agreement that the academy adopted in 1950, which stipulates that if an award winner or the winner's heirs ever put an Oscar up for sale, it has to be offered to the academy first for $1.

The Oscar presented to Welles, who died in 1985, had long been presumed lost, and his daughter asked the academy for a replacement in 1988. The academy agreed, but asked her to sign the agreement regarding potential sale of Oscar statuettes.

Orson Welles' original Oscar surfaced in 1994 in possession of Gary Graver, a cinematographer who had worked with the director. Graver sold the statuette for $50,000 to Bay Holdings, which then offered it for sale through Sotheby's auction house.

When Beatrice Welles heard of it, she sued to block the sale of the Oscar, which eventually was returned to her. After she offered the original Oscar for auction, the academy notified her she was obligated to return it under the agreement she signed for the duplicate statuette.

Welles then sued the academy, arguing the agreement applied only to the duplicate, not the original.

In last week's ruling, Pregerson agreed, saying the wording of the agreement did not cover the original award.

The academy "always knew they had no right to this Oscar, but they made this woman sue over it," said Welles attorney, Steven Ames Brown.

Academy attorney Quinto said he believes Welles understood that the academy's intent was to prevent the sale of any Oscars so the statuettes would not become "articles of commerce."
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grand theft sparrow

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Welles, Orson
« Reply #61 on: March 08, 2004, 09:47:47 PM »
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Why did I think that Spielberg owned this?

MacGuffin

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« Reply #62 on: March 08, 2004, 09:53:25 PM »
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Quote from: hacksparrow
Why did I think that Spielberg owned this?


Spielberg owns Rosebud. But usually when an "celeb" Oscar is put up at auction (Clark Gable's, for example), Spielberg will buy it and return it to the Academy.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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tpfkabi

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« Reply #63 on: March 08, 2004, 10:13:01 PM »
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i wonder how many Rosebud's there are then, since it/one got toasted at the end of the film?

are people's names actually printed on Oscars? i just wondered how you would know one from another
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MacGuffin

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« Reply #64 on: March 08, 2004, 10:15:18 PM »
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Quote from: bigideas
are people's names actually printed on Oscars? i just wondered how you would know one from another


Yes. A little plaque that has the name and what catagory it was won for.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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jwebb202

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Welles, Orson
« Reply #65 on: March 30, 2004, 12:19:43 AM »
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i just saw the trial yesterday & it blew me away
what an incredible piece of cinema

its so ahead of its time [just like every other orson welles movie]
brazil owes a lot to it

my mind has been further expanded

how can anyone deny welles' greatness??
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Pubrick

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« Reply #66 on: March 30, 2004, 05:37:08 AM »
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Quote from: jwebb202
how can anyone deny welles' greatness??

these are the reasons i've noticed..

-they havn't seen his movies
-they're not smart enuff
-they think the world began in 1994.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

eward

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« Reply #67 on: March 30, 2004, 07:56:11 AM »
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Quote from: jwebb202
i just saw the trial yesterday & it blew me away
what an incredible piece of cinema


i just saw it for the first time, too, a few days ago, and i agree 100%.....orson welles is definitely one of my top directors/writers/actors EVER

tpfkabi

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« Reply #68 on: March 31, 2004, 07:00:13 AM »
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so what versions / or how did you see the Trial?
somewhere, someone told me that there was a SE released rather recently. maybe '03?

does anyone want to talk about the ending? i'm not really familiar with Kafka, so i don't konw if i can bring anything to it.

the shots where K is running through those wooden panes with light shining through.....and with the creepy kids are pretty cool.......it looks like it's slighty sped up and it makes it even more creepy
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SoNowThen

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« Reply #69 on: March 31, 2004, 09:07:28 AM »
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It's Welles best, from what I've seen.


The locations make the movie.

Oh, and as to the ending, supposedly it's a bit different in Kafka's book. K struggles more or something. I have it on order, but haven't read it yet...
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tpfkabi

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« Reply #70 on: March 31, 2004, 02:17:31 PM »
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it was shot in an abandon airport hanger i think.
the shots will all the extras are amazing, too.
i wonder how he managed that with so little money?

isn't it funny when Welles first appears underneath the hot towel and makes some weird sound?...........and then when he takes it off to finally reveal his face, steam is rising from his head.
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Ravi

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« Reply #71 on: March 31, 2004, 10:22:17 PM »
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How is his Macbeth?

The Silver Bullet

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Welles, Orson
« Reply #72 on: May 05, 2004, 08:03:23 AM »
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"You look pretty splendid yourself, Orson."

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modage

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Welles, Orson
« Reply #73 on: February 02, 2005, 10:03:15 PM »
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i watched Lady From Shanghai a few weeks ago and i liked it pretty well.  although his thick irish accent took some getting used to.  (as did rita hayworth as a blonde for that matter), but overall it was a pretty good film with a few great scenes (like the funhouse) and definitely worth checking out for fans of noir.  its been a few years since i've watched either Kane or Evil though so i wonder how i would respond to either now.
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Fjodor

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« Reply #74 on: March 06, 2005, 03:36:09 PM »
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