Author Topic: M. Night Shyamalan  (Read 35450 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #165 on: October 21, 2010, 12:28:55 AM »
0
M. Night Shyamalan To Direct ‘One Thousand A.E.,’ Jaden Smith Linked To Lead
Source: The Playlist

M. Night Didn’t Write It, But The Guy Who Wrote ‘Book Of Eli’ Did With his name getting laughter and boos when it appeared in the trailer for “Devil” earlier this year, and his last few films facing the wrath of critics, M. Night Shyamalan continues to laugh all the way to the bank as his films—whether he directs or produces them—make money, and really, that’s all the studios care about. And speak of studios and money, it’s no surprise that Jaden Smith is now the Hollywood golden child after dominating the box office this summer with the surprise sensation, “The Karate Kid.” The pint sized Smith progeny is now eying M. Night Shyamalan’s next feature film titled “One Thousand A.E.” with the project being developed with the actor in mind. The film is actually different than the one Shyamalan shopped around Hollywood this summer with Bruce Willis, Bradley Cooper and Gwyneth Paltrow loosely attached. Instead, this one comes from writer Gary Whitta and if you’re thinking, “Ok, at least Shyamalan will get a decent script,” keep those expectations in check. Whitta is the guy responsible for “The Book Of Eli” so yeah, don’t expect this one to tax your brain too much. The project is set up with Overbrook which is a production shingle run by Will Smith, James Lassiter, Ken Stovitz and Jada Pinkett Smith. So yeah, momma and poppa Smith will be making sure it’s up to their rigorous standards before their spawn signs on. There is also an older male lead role available, but Will Smith is not expected to take it. Plot details are being kept under lock and key and while no studio is attached, Sony has a first look deal with Overbrook and is expected to pick it up. No details yet on production timelines but we’d wager that once Jaden Smith signs on, wheels will move quickly to get it in front of cameras.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #166 on: September 08, 2011, 12:13:14 AM »
0
M. Night Shyamalan & Will Smith’s ‘One Thousand A.E.’ To Hit Theaters On June 7, 2013
Source: Playlist

It has been three long years since Will Smith, arguably one of the biggest movie stars on the planet, was last on the big screen. In 2008 we saw two sides of the thesp: the blockbuster star in “Hancock” and the awards season contender in “Seven Pounds.” Neither film quite lived up to expectations though they were successful, but for his next couple projects, Will Smith is determined to bring home the bacon. Next year he’ll be back with his mega-franchise in tow for “Men In Black III” and he won’t be keeping fans waiting as 2013 will once again see him at a theater near you.

Though word has been quiet on the project, things are ramping up for M. Night Shyamalan‘s “One Thousand A.E.” which in case you forgot will pair father and son, Will and Jaden Smith. Details are being kept tight, but the story will follow a young boy and his estranged father who crash land on a planet and have to explore to it. Last year, all Jaden would reveal is “it’s set in the future and it’s about a journey.” Duh.

The movie will now hit theaters on June 7, 2013, arriving one week before Zack Snyder‘s “Man of Steel.” You already know how we feel about M. Night Shyamalan but Will Smith tends to be very picky, so we presume there is something here that he likes (and no doubt he’ll be hiring folks to fine tune the script to his tastes). Filming is slated to begin in early 2012.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

Reelist

  • Shoutbox Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2600
  • Respect: +965
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #167 on: September 08, 2011, 12:35:25 AM »
0
Yeah Will Smith, you turn down Tarantino's next project to work with M. Night, that's what you do. ( I'm glad you did that )
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #168 on: May 29, 2012, 08:11:16 AM »
0
A Fan Of ‘Tree of Life’ & ‘Jurassic Park?’ Then You’ll Love ‘After Earth’ Says M. Night Shyamalan
Source: Playlist

While Twitter remains a vital tool for filmmakers to reach out to audiences worldwide, there are some public figures for which the medium just seems ill-fitted. Directors like Kevin Smith and Edgar Wright have their sensibilities precisely tuned to the format, but on the other end of the spectrum, M. Night Shyamalan, who quietly casts out filmmaking advice and shout-outs to followers, just seems peculiarly distant after maintaining a veil of secrecy for so long. Still, updates on his latest film, “After Earth,” have offered a compelling view from his perspective, the latest of which finds the director making some bold proclamations in addition to ruminating on his ambitions in the filmmaking realm.

With his new movie heading into post-production, Shyamalan took the time on Twitter to express feelings of pressure around his sci-fi drama, where the focus now moves to handing shots over to talented visual effects teams for completion. “This is a very difficult and counter intuitive process,” the director explained, “I haven't even edited the film thoroughly and I'm committing to takes.” Shyamalan is no stranger to the complications of effects work in post-production, but “After Earth,” with its futuristic plotline and environments, looks to be especially difficult in this regard. Besides, effects teams need all the time they can get to perfect their individual shots, and oftentimes they come right down to the wire to deliver a final addition (for example, witness just how much of “The Avengers’” finale was incomplete in the film’s first trailer).

Still, after much public exchange with his followers, Shyamalan went beyond production woes to a much more personal place, where he elaborated on the vision behind all his films, that of large-scale CGI dynamics combined with performance-driven stories. “This has been my problem from go,” he said, “I keep trying to make indie dramas in the bodies of high concept movies. Tough serving two masters.” Obviously we’ve seen this difficult effort in previous films like “Lady in the Water” and “The Happening,” but “After Earth,” which follows Will and Jaden Smith as a father and son returning to Earth a millennium after its abandonment, could prove to break that streak. Shyamalan seems pretty confident about it at least, and even narrows down his key demographic by saying, “Maybe the tag line should be, 'If you loved 'Tree of Life' and 'Jurassic Park,' you'll love 'After Earth.' "

It’s an intriguing teaser for the upcoming film, which also stars Isabelle Fuhrman, Sophie Okonedo and Zoe Kravitz, so possibly expect some Berlioz and empathetic dinosaurs when “After Earth” opens June 7, 2013.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

polkablues

  • Child of Myth
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 7038
  • Respect: +1758
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #169 on: May 29, 2012, 11:04:02 AM »
0
A fan of gourmet food? Then you'll love this shit sandwich, says M. Night Shyamalan.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

mogwai

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1202
  • Respect: +67
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #170 on: May 29, 2012, 11:31:07 AM »
0
I wasn't a fan of Tree of life so I know this movie will be fucking shit.

Pubrick

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12170
  • Lynchian identity mystery
  • Respect: +769
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #171 on: May 29, 2012, 11:50:23 AM »
0
All I get from that comparison is it's gonna have dinosaurs in it.

Which makes no sense since the movie is supposedly set in the future.

Which makes no sense

makes no sense

Makes No Sense
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #172 on: August 02, 2012, 08:06:38 PM »
0
M. Night Shyamalan Jumping Into Scripted TV With Syfy Project (Exclusive)
UPDATED: Marti Noxon is also attached to produce, with Shyamalan possibly directing.
Source: THR

Syfy is getting into business with feature filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan.

The cable network has given a put-pilot commitment to a project from Shyamalan and Buffy the Vampire Slayer's Marti Noxon titled Proof, marking his first foray into scripted television, The Hollywood Reporter has learned exclusively.

Shyamalan, who made his mark with The Sixth Sense, would direct the Universal Cable Productions project.

Proof centers on the son of a billionaire tech genius who offers a large reward for anyone who can find proof of life after death following the tragic accident and sudden passing of his parents.

Shyamalan and Noxon will co-write the project and serve as EPs. Ashwin Rajan, of Shyamalan's Blinding Eagle, will also serve as an exec producer.

Shyamalan's jump to the small screen comes after Syfy renewed Total Blackout and Lost Girl, opted not to move forward with Sanctuary and bid farewell to long-time series Eureka. He also has some history at the network. In 2004, the then-called Sci Fi Channel was involved in a controversial "special," The Buried Secret of M. Night Shyamalan, that ended up being a marketing ploy for The Village.

Shyamalan recently wrapped Sony's After Earth with Will and Jaden Smith. Noxon, who counts Mad Men, Glee and Grey's Anatomy, as some of her other TV credits, is penning The Glass Castle adaptation for Lionsgate and Gil Netter.

UCP is behind shows like USA's Psych, Suits and Royal Pains, and Syfy's upcoming Defiance, Eureka and Alphas.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #173 on: May 30, 2013, 01:59:52 PM »
0
M. Night Shyamalan, 'After Earth' Director, On A Sequel To 'Unbreakable' And His Relationship With Critics
Mike Ryan; Huffington Post

M. Night Shyamalan is the director of the new Will Smith movie, "After Earth." This is a fact that you might not be aware of, because Shyamalan is not a major aspect of the film's marketing campaign. It's a twist from how things were for the 42-year-old director in the aftermath of 1999's "The Sixth Sense," when Shyamalan's name alone was often enough to sell his movies. Following an impressive run of critical and financial successes ("The Sixth Sense," "Unbreakable," "Signs"), the waters have cooled a bit for Shyamalan over his last few movies ("The Lady in the Water," "The Happening," "The Last Airbender").

In person, Shyamalan is about as cordial as they come. When we met on Wednesday afternoon, he was wearing an Iron Man t-shirt; it made him seem approachable and endearing. So did this: Shyamalan was tipped off that May 29 was my birthday, so no matter how contentious the below conversation seems to get at times, keep in mind that it ended with him and me eating a cupcake.
Before the interview, I was told that nothing was off limits. So, with that, we started talking.

You're looking through Life magazines.

It's so cool, man. Look how beautiful Cybil Shepard was during "The Last Picture Show," which is one of my favorite movies.

I wouldn't have guessed that.

It's all tone. Bogdanovich, his control of tone is insane.

Most people remember Shepard from "Moonlighting."

She was amazing in "Moonlighting," but, this movie ... she's more powerful than the movie and your heart is taken away with this not-so-glamorous girl.

This is my segue, but speaking of tone, "After Earth" doesn't have the typical tone that we are used to from you.
Well, I think it's a hybrid, right?

There are moments.

Moments, yeah. Quiet kind of has its place in the movie -- you know, the quiet stillness and the introspective stuff. Which I think we're talking about, that kind of tonal thing. You know, it's interesting: I think my movies are primarily dramas -- you know, 70 percent drama and 30 percent whatever the genre is -- and then normally they're sold on that genre piece. And that causes a weird reaction of, "Oh my God, I didn't know it was 70 percent this other thing." And this time it's at least 50/50.

But this one seems less your movie than what we've seen in the past since probably "Stuart Little." This has been publicized as Will Smith's movie.

I don't know if I'd say that as much. "Stuart Little" would be the one that I just kind of embraced it, but, to some extent, that was a lot me, too -- the tone that came through. I've become a version of whomever I'm working with, to some extent. Does that make sense?

How so?

Like if I'm working with Scott Rudin on "The Village," I start leaning more that way in the way I'm thinking a lot -- so, I'm more toward that person, my partner, a lot. And, on this one, it was Will.

But I feel like something like "The Sixth Sense," you can say, "This is my vision. This is my movie."

Yeah, from the beginning.

But I feel on this one Will Smith can tell you, "No, I'm looking to do it this way. Do that for me."

I think the balance of it was that he left me mostly to my devices in terms of how to portray the character's journey. So, I'd say, "Well, maybe he gets poisoned by a leech." I remember writing that sequence. And I think Will's influence specifically would be seen, say, in an action scene where I would stop at "two" and we might go "three" or "four" -- go one more beat in the action. And I definitely learned from that in terms of -- I'm a big self-analysis guy, making sure I go through therapy all of the time with myself.

What's that mean?

You know, that's what making a movie is: therapy for me.

Which movie is the most therapeutic?

They're all.

Equally?

Yeah, they're all like that. They all represent where I am. Does that make sense? And in this one, working on this movie -- I have two types of minimalism. I love, really love, to be minimum. Left to my own devices, I'd definitely do "The Tree of Life." That's where I would go. I'd love to do that -- ambiguous and quiet and all that stuff.

Do you consider yourself a filmmaker like Malick?

Well, he's so courageous. I don't know if I'm quite as courageous as him.

How so?

You know, there's a kind on insinuation that we were talking about with "The Last Picture Show," just a tone. There's very little plot in "The Last Picture Show." It's not based on plot. The plot comes in and out, but your driving force is tone. A lot of Malick's movies and especially "The Tree of Life" for me -- I can't tell you that I knew exactly what was going on, but emotionally I was 100 percent there. So, he was working on a subconscious level.

Let's say you made a Terrence Malick-type movie. Do you think it would have been better received, say, right after "Unbreakable" came out or now? That people would have given you more of a shot back then with something so abstract and that critics would be more unfair today?

God, I don't know. I've come to think of it more as a body of work. That's the way I've always thought about it to some extent, but it's the healthiest way to continue to think about it rather than kind of going on each one in its particular context at that moment and its particular expectations of that moment. Those can be driven by the marketing, those can be driven by the previous movie, it can be driven by other movies -- you know, that kind of thing.

Do you feel that critics have turned on you?

[Laughs] No, no. I definitely think that they're seeing it more -- I think it will be easier to see in a body of work, I think.

You had a critic character in "Lady in the Water."

I don't feel an adversarial relationship to them -- I goof around with them in "Lady in the Water."

But you see why some critics take that as a personal attack? He's brutally killed.

[Laughs] I know.

And you cast yourself as the writer with the important vision.

Well, it was all about storytelling. And all about kind of all the aspects of storytelling -- that movie's main character is named "Story" and all of that stuff. I mean, it was a tongue-in-cheek movie.

Could "The Sixth Sense" be a phenomenon today? With the Internet, could it have kept its secret for as long as it did.

I don't know. It would have been difficult, I think, today. It would have been difficult. For sure the headline on Twitter would have been like "surprise ending," right? Or "I didn't guess the ending." It immediately orients you in a different way to it. I don't think it would have been the same experience in today's market. The fact is, it was very lucky timing. It was right before the Internet became a real, real place where everyone constantly went. I remember it at the time, it wasn't even talked about when we put that movie out.

I remember I had no desire to see it at first because it looked too much like "Mercury Rising," Bruce Willis' other movie with a child actor.

"Mercury Rising"? I'm trying to remember it.

Then the word of mouth came.

Right. It would be different, one way or the other. In some ways, it could have been recommended faster. So, it could have been that or it could have been talked about in the wrong way too quickly.

Did you ever feel caught up in having to have a twist? Did you ever feel that you had to do it?

No, I never -- I don't think like that.

A lot of your movies have twists.

They do. So, in my mind, if it turned out that I did 10 movies and seven of them had twists, that's great.

You never thought, I need to stump the audience again?

No. I don't ever think of it like that. That's kind of outside-inside thinking where it's really none of them are that. None of them are a gimmick.

I don't think they're a gimmick. But I wonder if there's something internal that makes you want to one-up yourself.

Not at all. Not at all. What I'm trying to say is it's not an outside thinking thing. This is the story of a young reporter who is turning 39 and he wants the day of his birthday to be amazing.

I fear this is going to end badly for me.

I'm going to tell it from the point of view of the person that didn't know him. And then I reveal the story, reveal what your actual plan was for your birthday. An angle on the story rather than thinking of it like like I need to have a twist. It's what's the most provocative angle to tell the story? And from that, it becomes a revelation of another part of the story. So it's more of a paradigm shift in how to tell the story than it is thinking of it as a gimmick.

You've gotten away from that in your last couple of movies.

I don't think of it like that. You know, my first two movies before "The Sixth Sense" were just straight movies -- and "Signs" was a straight movie. And "Lady in the Water" was a straight movie, in that way. Although there are revelations in those movies.

You tried to make "Life of Pi." Was it hard at all to watch Ang Lee win an Oscar for Best Director for that movie?

No. You know, there are so many movies that I wish I had made. And Ang doing it is like the perfect ending to that story for me.

That's a nice thing to say, but how?

He's my hero. All of his movies, even before "The Ice Storm" -- which I think is a masterpiece -- just to have someone that I think is a master-level storyteller to take that story, which is a boy from Pondicherry [in India], where I was born ... You know, I love that movie a lot and I love that book a lot. It means a lot. It was nice to see things work out for everybody. It's happy, as opposed to if it was done by somebody that I didn't like or didn't think as highly of. I would have felt bad about the situation.

Is there a movie that you wish you could have another shot at or film a different way? A movie that audience didn't respond to as well as you had hoped.

Well, you always have a way of making it more accessible. Always. The decision is always between "accessible" and "authentic."

What's an example?

Well, let's say, for example, like a difficult decision for the main characters -- let's say at the end of "The Village" -- a difficult decision to continue the lie versus the youth becoming free. And winning the day. And realizing their opportunities of being able to come into the light of the real world and to a Times Square kind of vibe. So, that would be provocative and empowering, but I chose to make it morally ambiguous. But it was more authentic to me. My whole conversation with that movie was I'm nervous about the world.

What specifically?

Living out the fantasy of protecting your children and how far would you go to protect your children from everything. "Would you lie to them about everything?" kind of thing. So, that was the premise of this story. So, you know what's an authentic decision for the artist versus what's the more accessible decision. That's the struggle you make all of the time in your commerce versus art conversation.

There's been talk of an "Unbreakable" sequel for a long time.

Yeah.

Samuel L. Jackson seems to want to do it. I saw you two talking on Twitter.

It's a harder one for me because -- it's getting closer, by the way.

I feel like I've heard that for the past 10 years. I want that to be true.

I want it to happen, too. We've been talking about almost the same subject in every one of your questions, which is artistic integrity -- something versus an agenda. Right? And almost every single one of your questions was agenda versus intention, even though you didn't realize it, but it kind of fell into that theme as we were talking.

Agenda how?

So, like you think I go and I write, "Oh, I'm going to write a twist ending."

I didn't know. That's why I asked.

That's an agenda versus "I want to talk about loneliness." And then it comes out, "How is the best way to talk about loneliness?" Intention versus agenda. And then I go, "Oh my God, if I make a movie about loneliness and everybody hated it, will it be able to come out and people will get it?" That's when you start going, "Oh my God," and you try to push that away. The same thing with "Unbreakable," to some extent, it's excitement to be made. "It's such a fun thing" is squashing my ability to find the thing that's connecting me with it. Does that make sense? So, I don't feel like I did it for agenda reasons. So, slowly I'm getting a story in my head that I feel like is able to tell what I'm feeling right now.

For people who like that movie, it sounds encouraging.

Yeah, it is! The story of a guy who kind of wakes up with a little gray feeling in the morning, I love that character. It's something that I feel and I want to talk more about that character.

Another is a possible sequel to "The Last Airbender." A movie that critics didn't like, but it did make a lot of money.

Yeah, I love the kind of Eastern philosophies of that. Those are costly movies to make and they take a lot of time. So, what happens is, there's a thriller I can do pretty fast, they go quickly. And I didn't expect to make another big movie -- I was going to make a thriller and then go make the sequel to "Airbender." Then I made "After Earth," which took a long time, so it kind of took that two-and-a-half to three-year period. So, I'm trying to sit down and see if I want to do a really small movie next.

Honestly, I'd love to see you do a really small movie.

I am really leaning towards doing a hyper-small movie.

Like something on the festival circuit.

Yep. And that's where my head is right now, by the way. I'm leaning towards that.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

Sleepless

  • The Master of Three Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1782
  • I told you I would eat you
  • Respect: +330
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #174 on: May 30, 2013, 02:31:53 PM »
0
A Fan Of ‘Tree of Life’ Chris Nolan & ‘Jurassic Park?’ Paul Thomas Anderson? Then You’ll Love ‘After Earth’ Says M. Night Shyamalan

polkablues

  • Child of Myth
  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 7038
  • Respect: +1758
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #175 on: May 30, 2013, 03:57:38 PM »
0
Shyamalan seems like a pleasant enough guy. It's a shame he's such a buffoon.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

Brando

  • The Meeting with the Goddess
  • ***
  • Posts: 310
  • One of the top 5 Don Johnson movies, TIN CUP!
  • Respect: +85
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #176 on: May 30, 2013, 04:26:10 PM »
0
Shyamalan seems like a pleasant enough guy. It's a shame he's such a buffoon.

I met an Art Director who's worked on some big films and through a conversation about his job he started to talk about M. Night Shyamalan. I don't think he worked on the Last Airbender but knew some that did and said he's very difficult to work with cause he can't listen to the advice and suggestions from anyone else working on the film. He made the point of saying M Night is a nice guy and not a complete psycho like Micheal Bay. The conversation then went to how Michael Bay really is crazy and you'd be on his set and he'll just start screaming out demands like "I want everyone on the other side of the river!" " I want that house on fire!"
If you think this is going to have a happy ending, you haven't been paying attention.

MacGuffin

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 22985
  • Respect: +638
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #177 on: January 29, 2014, 02:47:28 PM »
0
Sixth Sense’s M. Night Shyamalan, Bruce Willis Re-Team For ‘Labor Of Love’
BY MIKE FLEMING JR | Deadline
   
EXCLUSIVE: M. Night Shyamalan is in talks to re-team with Bruce Willis in Labor Of Love, based on one of the very first scripts Shyamalan sold in his career. The project will be financed by Emmett/Furla/Oasis, which is coming off the twice Oscar-nominated hit Lone Survivor and is prepping the Martin Scorsese-directed Silence. The plan is to start production mid-September in Philadelphia. IM Global’s Stuart Ford is making a deal to sell the picture in Berlin. Randall Emmett and George Furla are producing with Blinding Edge’s Shyamalan and Ashwin Rajan.

Shyamalan and Willis made The Sixth Sense and Unbreakable, which are my two favorite films by the director. This project goes back even further, as it was one of the very first screenplays that Shyamalan sold. This one went to Fox in 1993, but it didn’t get made back then because Shyamalan was fighting to get into the director’s chair and the studio wasn’t biting. The script came into play several years ago when Denzel Washington was eyeing it.

It’s a lot closer to Shyamalan’s first script Praying With Anger than the supernatural stuff he did later. In Labor Of Love, Willis will play a Philadelphia book store owner who loses the love of  his life in a tragic accident. Never big on words, he becomes haunted by the notion that he never properly told his wife how much he loved her. Since she once asked if he would walk across the country for her, he decides to show her posthumously just how much he did love her. That trek starts from Philadelphia to Pacifica, CA, which was her favorite place. Fox controls the script, but I’m told this is being worked out and should be all sorted by next month when it becomes a hot title in Berlin.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

Just Withnail

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1629
  • Respect: +456
    • Truls Krane Meby's website
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #178 on: January 29, 2014, 04:46:16 PM »
0
Since she once asked if he would walk across the country for her, he decides to show her posthumously just how much he did love her. That trek starts from Philadelphia to Pacifica, CA, which was her favorite place.

Aha. So it's UP?
My short WORLD WIDE WOVEN BODIES is now online:

Watch it here!

©brad

  • Admin
  • *****
  • Posts: 4506
  • Respect: +218
Re: M. Night Shyamalan
« Reply #179 on: January 29, 2014, 05:07:55 PM »
+1
We need a new term for failing upward.

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy