Author Topic: Criterion News and Discussion  (Read 354260 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

wilder

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3738
  • Respect: +1875
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2325 on: February 21, 2018, 12:27:00 PM »
+2
wow wow wow



DVD Beaver review











jenkins

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2648
  • Respect: +1625
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2326 on: February 21, 2018, 12:48:19 PM »
+2
it's a must for me, of course it is.

i was thinking the other night that i say "they don't make them like they used to" while referring to things that were made before i was born. in some ways i believe i've accelerated the process of becoming elderly

wilder

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3738
  • Respect: +1875
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2327 on: February 24, 2018, 06:57:01 AM »
0
A Criterion box set is in the works of five films from Greek director Nico Papatakis. Yorgos Lanthimos talks about him, below.



Quote
“It’s become a cliché to call a filmmaker ‘rebellious,’ but from Gance to Eisenstein to Pasolini to Buñuel, the 20th century saw true rebels who fiercely defied both the cinematic and political establishments of their time. Nikos Papatakis (1918- 2010)—nicknamed Nico in France—holds a profound and unique place in this lineage through a body of work that blends anarchic fury with visceral and transcendent poetry. Born in Addis Ababa to an Ethiopian mother and a Greek father, Papatakis was an outcast by nature, mocked and ostracized as a child for being biracial. Deeply rooted in personal experience, Papatakis’s films are politically, morally, and formally subversive explorations of race, gender, and class that use the medium as a vehicle of opposition and dissent.” —Yonca Talu, Sept/Oct 2017 issue


Les Abysses (1963)



This allegorical portrait of the Algerian resistance was inspired by the real-life story of the Papin sisters, two maids who brutally murdered their employers in 1930s France—also the basis for Jean Genet’s influential 1947 play The Maids and Claude Chabrol’s 1995 psychological thriller La Cérémonie.



The Shepherds of Disorder (1967)



The Shepherds of Disorder (Thanos and Despina) juxtaposes an anthropological and materialist study of a rigid rural community with the mythologically imbued, forbidden romance between a rebellious shepherd and the angelic and compliant daughter of a rich conservative family, engaged in an erotically charged power game.



Gloria Mundi (1976)



Papatakis’s most psychedelic and intellectually challenging film, Gloria Mundi, a virulent denunciation of consumer capitalism and a hypocritical left-wing intelligentsia that deems itself political but does not take any action, begins with a scream and ends with an explosion.



The Photograph (1986)



Papatakis’s most accessible, gripping, and poignant work is a meticulously crafted, intimate meditation on immigration and exile centering on a 26-year-old Greek man fresh out of prison (where he was tortured for being a communist’s son) who leaves for France in hopes of a better life, and where he strikes up a complicated friendship with a distant relative.


Walking a Tightrope (1992)



The director’s final film—starring Michel Piccoli as a fictional version of Papatakis’s friend Jean Genet—is a compendium of the themes and motifs that pervade his distinctive filmography, including the torturous nature of love, the suffering induced by exile, and suicide as an act of rebellion.




wilder

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3738
  • Respect: +1875
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2328 on: March 01, 2018, 11:11:55 AM »
0
jacked from the folks at Criterion Forum:

Josef von Sternberg’s Morocco (1930) is forthcoming




jenkins

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2648
  • Respect: +1625
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2329 on: March 01, 2018, 11:58:55 AM »
+1
it's such a great overall movie, and it has this particular achievement

[broken youtube link to Marline smoking another woman's cigarette]
« Last Edit: July 03, 2018, 02:17:22 AM by jenkins »

wilder

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3738
  • Respect: +1875
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2330 on: March 15, 2018, 04:06:08 AM »
0
Criterion's Peter Becker was just interviewed by Elvis Mitchell on The Treatment

He mentions select episodes of Cinéma, de notre temps are coming to Filmstruck, specifically one focused on the three years it took Cassavetes to edit Faces, and another on Robert Bresson

wilder

  • Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3738
  • Respect: +1875
Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #2331 on: Today at 06:09:41 PM »
0
First I’ve heard of this but am very interested.



Ben du Toit is a schoolteacher who always has considered himself a man of caring and justice, at least on the individual level. When his gardener's son is brutally beaten up by the police at a demonstration by black school children, he gradually begins to realize his own society is built on a pillar of injustice and exploitation.



 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy