Author Topic: Criterion News and Discussion  (Read 311360 times)

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phil marlowe

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #135 on: July 14, 2003, 04:23:56 PM »
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didn't ebert co-write it or something?

Gold Trumpet

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #136 on: July 15, 2003, 10:27:32 PM »
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INGMAR BERGMAN IS MAKING A MOVIE

Its a documentary. Its been added to the upcoming Ingmar Bergman Trilogy and to add upon that, it officially has a spine number now:

http://www.criterionco.com/asp/release.asp?id=212

and phil, yep. look for a special feature on the movie with him as well.

~rougerum

bonanzataz

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #137 on: July 15, 2003, 11:15:00 PM »
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Quote from: Ghoulardi Goon
Bonanzataz, this movie's so bad it's good!  You know you wanna buy it!  :-D


i'm afraid you've got it all wrong, ghoulardi goon. this movie is so good it's great. looks like my bootleg dvd is going out of commission!
The corpses all hang headless and limp bodies with no surprises and the blood drains down like devil’s rain we’ll bathe tonight I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls Demon I am and face I peel to see your skin turned inside out, ’cause gotta have you on my wall gotta have you on my wall, ’cause I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls collect the heads of little girls and put ’em on my wall hack the heads off little girls and put ’em on my wall I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls

godardian

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #138 on: July 17, 2003, 12:40:36 AM »
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Quote from: P
let me predict: duck sauce will agree, so will ebeaman, and sexterrossa if he reads it, and so will godardian, silver bullet, mesh, and punchdrunk23. the usual bitches.

cry, cry again.


Correct. That pretty well summed it up for me. It's that "digging chicks" thing. The same old bullshit implication that sexual orientation is a character issue and that homosexuality is inferior in some way to heterosexuality. If something's actually funny, it can always pass no matter how offensive, but that's way too retrograde and dull-minded to be really funny.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Gold Trumpet

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #139 on: July 17, 2003, 09:29:25 PM »
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Usually wouldn't post this as official news, but the revelation of the cover for Fassbinder's BRD Trilogy has been revealed and in my mind, is Criterion's sexiest and most unique cover to date. Not to say it is the best, but this is worth fucking noting:

http://www.criterionco.com/content/images/full_boxshot/203_box_348x490.jpg

~rougerum

godardian

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #140 on: July 19, 2003, 12:29:14 PM »
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Criterion cover art is often really primo. The Olmis are the best recently (also Jubilee, which I insist on mentioning as often as possible because I think it's really criminally ignored here and everywhere).

I love the cover art for Brief Encounter and Pygmalion. And Ratcatcher. Those always spring to mind first when thinking of great Criterion covers.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Gold Trumpet

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #141 on: July 27, 2003, 07:51:22 PM »
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Rumors: You're going to see more films from Robert Bresson released by Criterion, if Paul Schrader is right. From a post in another forum.........

"Paul Schrader, during a Q&A after the screening of Pickpocket last night at the Skirball center in L.A., casually mentioned that Criterion has recently acquired "a bunch of Bresson films" and that he's doing some work with them for the releases."

Now, Diary of a Country Priest already belonged to Criterion. Criterion has already been announced as releasing to theatres again, via Rialto, these films: Mouchard and Au hazard, Balthazar.

Another post summed up other possibilities and dvd rights logistics for future releases of Bresson by Criterion:

"So, for the record, the ones that could possibly be coming from Criterion (except for the 3 we assume and the 1 we already have) are Les Anges du péché (1943) and Le Procès de Jeanne d'Arc (1962). I suppose it's possible that they could have wrested control of some other films away from New Yorker the way they apparently did the Ozus. New Yorker have already announced or alluded to releases of A Man Escaped, Lancelot du Lac, and L'Argent, but have not mentioned Pickpocket, Une Femme douce, or Le Diable probablement. They also seem to hold or to have held at one time the US rights to Quatre nuits d'un rêveur, but these seem to be very problematic. As www.robert-bresson.com reports, a print could not be rented for an upcoming Bresson retrospective. I know that one exists, however, because I saw a pristine new print but a few years ago.

Procès is a Pathé film (from whom Criterion have licensed films before) that seems to have no current US rights-holder, so this is a definite possibility.

MGM, of all people, seem to hold the US rights to Les Anges, but who knows, they may have lapsed. Unlikely to be released anyhow, as it's probably Bresson's least popular and least 'Bressonian' film"

~rougerum

modage

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #142 on: July 30, 2003, 04:41:13 PM »
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Rounding out today's news are three new additions to The Criterion Collection, set for release on October 11th.

Jean-Pierre Melville's Le Cercle Rouge gets the two-disc treatment, complete with a remastered 1.37:1 transfer and the original French mono track, plus tons of extras including excerpts from Cinéastes de notres temps, the 1970 documentary Jean-Pierre Melville (Portrait en 9 Poses), new video interviews with Melville friend and editor of Melville on Melville, Rui Nogueira, and assistant director Bernard Stora, 30 minutes of rare on-set footage featuring interviews with director Jean-Pierre Melville and cast, French television interview footage with Melville and Delon, the original theatrical and 2002 re-release trailers, a still gallery, new essays by film critics Michael Sragow and Chris Fujiwara, plus an introduction from filmmaker John Woo. Retail is $39.95.

Next is Yasujiro Ozu 's Tokyo Story, also newly remastered in 1.37:1 full screen and Japanese mono. Extras include an audio commentary by Ozu-film scholar David Desser, the 120-minute documentary "I Lived, But..." about the life and career of Ozu, "Talking with Ozu," a 30-minute tribute to featuring reflections from his fellow filmmakers, the original theatrical trailer, and a new essay by David Bordwell, author of Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema. Retail is also $39.95.

Last but not least is Steven Soderbergh's little-seen Schizopolis, which gets a new 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen and English mono soundtrack. Supplements include two audio commentaries, one with Soderbergh interviewing himself, the other with producer John Hardy, actor and casting director David Jensen, production sound mixer Paul Ledford, and actor Michael Malone, deleted scenes, the original theatrical trailer and a new essay by Village Voice critic Dennis Lim. Retail is $39.95.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

Ernie

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #143 on: July 30, 2003, 05:04:50 PM »
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Alright, cool. I've been wanting to see Le Cercle Rouge. I was such an idiot, I passed up on the re-release when it actually came here cause it was before I had really heard a lot about him (Melville). Like the month after that I hear Tarantino calling him a genius...bad luck. Anyway, I think I'll like Jean Pierre Melville. Sounds awesome. Can't wait.

SoNowThen

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #144 on: July 31, 2003, 09:18:35 AM »
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you will, Ebs. He's so fucking good!
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

modage

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #145 on: August 01, 2003, 06:10:16 PM »
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schizopolis cover art in the soderbergh thread.

also: not sure if this is posted elsewhere...

Criterion's upcoming DVD release of Roman Polanski's Knife in the Water has been expanded to include a collection of Polanski's short films from 1957-1962. This two-disc set now includes the films Murder, Teeth Smile, Break Up the Dance, Two Men and a Wardrobe, The Lamp, When Angels Fall, The Fat and the Lean, and Mammals. Look for Knife in the Water in September.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

Gold Trumpet

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #146 on: August 18, 2003, 10:47:18 AM »
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November Releases announced: http://dvdtimes.co.uk/index.cgi?page=News&id=4975

In it, Jean Renoir's The Rules of the Game; Federico Fellini's La Strada; Laurence Olivier's Richard III; David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch. All going for $39.95 and special editions. Stay tuned for more details.

~rougerum

SoNowThen

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #147 on: August 18, 2003, 10:56:41 AM »
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Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
Federico Fellini's La Strada


...have been waiting for almost two years, when it first appeared on a Criterion new release booklet.

Finally.
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

eward

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #148 on: August 18, 2003, 12:06:56 PM »
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right on.

Ravi

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Re: Criterion News and Discussion
« Reply #149 on: August 18, 2003, 01:31:27 PM »
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Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch


I can think of two things wrong with that title.

 

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