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Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese

eward · 19 · 1460

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eward

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Reply #15 on: June 13, 2019, 06:55:21 AM
Fiction can be more truthful than fact.
"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

"No, I don't even laugh at seasickness! I happen to regard jealousy as the seasickness of passion."


eward

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Reply #16 on: June 16, 2019, 11:29:39 PM
Has no one else come under this masterpiece's spell? Am I the only Dylan freak round these parts?

Something is happening here but you don't know what it is...
"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

"No, I don't even laugh at seasickness! I happen to regard jealousy as the seasickness of passion."


wilberfan

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Reply #17 on: June 17, 2019, 12:32:35 AM
Has no one else come under this masterpiece's spell? Am I the only Dylan freak round these parts?


You may be. 

I watched about 2/3rds of this before bailing.  It was deeply nostalgic to see this footage (I was in college at the time), but I can't say I was ever a big fan of Dylan.  I respect his word craft and acknowledge his massive cultural influence, but can't honestly say he was ever one of my favorite musicians. (I'm glancing at my vinyl collection.  I may not own a single album of his.)   


Honestly, the two things in this doc that really made me take notice was the reminder of what a great voice Joan Baez had (has?) and--this really surprised me--what a wonderful bass player he had on stage with him.   (I'd never heard of the guy.  His bass lines impressed the hell out of me.) 


I'll also admit that learning that some of the doc wasn't "real" (see the link I posted, above) pretty much ruined the experience for me.   Call me Old School, but, as with this reviewer, I didn't see the point, and felt it only took away from the experience--rather than adding anything positive. 
"Trying to fit in since 2017."


eward

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Reply #18 on: June 17, 2019, 12:58:17 PM
I really loved the fabrications and think they add a great deal - two key factors of the first leg of that tour that are (to me) conspicuously absent: the making of Renaldo & Clara - a long buried 4 hour hybrid art-film improv experiment/concert doc/tour diary directed by Dylan (playing "Renaldo") and shot by Howard Alk, which Sam Shepard was brought on to write, though the script was most often abandoned mid-take - and the presence of Sara Dylan (the titular Clara). Most of the backstage footage is culled from that film, so what we're seeing is everybody playing loose versions of themselves.


Scorsese's approach here almost compliments/completes Dylan's ill-received cinematic vision 40 years later.

"If somebody's wearing a mask, he's gonna tell you the truth. If he's not wearing a mask, it's highly unlikely," says Dylan, pointedly not wearing a mask. Dylan's always been a trickster.

I've watched this 4 times so far - twice on the big screen, twice at home. I can't get enough of it.

With Dylan, I find, most people are either all in or just not interested. I am thoroughly in, have been since discovering him properly at the age of 18 (largely due to having viewed No Direction Home).



"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

"No, I don't even laugh at seasickness! I happen to regard jealousy as the seasickness of passion."