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Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno

wilder · 5 · 1960

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wilder

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on: March 02, 2018, 01:38:03 PM


Follows a young screenwriter faced with a difficult choice between his lover and his career.

Directed by Abdellatif Kechich (Blue is the Warmest Color)
Starring Shaïn Boumedine, Ophélie Bau, Salim Kechiouche, Lou Luttiau, Alexia Chardard and Hafsia Herzi
Release Date - March 21st in France, US release TBD


Drenk

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Reply #1 on: March 02, 2018, 02:06:59 PM
Yeeeeeeeeees.
I'm so many people.


Drenk

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Reply #2 on: March 25, 2018, 07:36:44 PM
Yeeeeeeeeees.

And now that I've seen it: Yeeeeeeees.

It's insane. Kechiche is insane. I don't know how it works, but it works. It's the most Kechiche movie he's done and a great movie about the artistic process.
I'm so many people.


Drenk

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Reply #3 on: May 23, 2019, 08:41:00 PM
The sequel (Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo) has screened at Cannes and is, apparently, batshit crazy; some people wonder if it's even possible to release that version. I love the nightclub sequence in the first one, I wonder how he can last three hours like that—but I'm really excited. Kechiche is insane in a way that gives courage. For a lot of reasons.
I'm so many people.


Drenk

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Reply #4 on: June 02, 2019, 06:05:33 PM
This thread belongs to me, apparently.

Anyway, I read this great New Yorker article about Blue is The Warmest Color. This paragraph is essential:

Quote
Kechiche is what the French would call a republican; he was born in Tunisia, but his cinema is French. His subject, here—no less than in such films as “The Secret of the Grain” and “Games of Love and Chance”—is the conflict between cultural inheritance and group identification. And for Kechiche, the site of conflict, is the body. “Blue Is the Warmest Color” is a political film in the deepest sense; its harsh physicality is a visual sort of Occupy France, a struggle for an impartial but well-defined civic space where people aren’t threatened, literally or metaphorically, by religious, ethnic, or political-party bonds of exclusion. Yet, at the same time, he shows (whether in scenes of Adèle’s persecution in high school or her inhibition with her parents) that groups erect walls of identification as a psychological (and, when necessary, even physical) means of self-defense, when society at large doesn’t do so. His film is a radical lay work (no pun intended) of tolerance and inclusion—and the terrifying furies that ravage Adèle and Emma as their romance founder—seem to be ripped from France’s headlines.

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/richard-brody/the-sexual-politics-of-blue-is-the-warmest-color

"a struggle for an impartial but well-defined civic space where people aren’t threatened, literally or metaphorically, by religious, ethnic, or political-party bonds of exclusion": that can be applied to Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno, too, which is more of an utopia than Blue (which is quite harsh...).
I'm so many people.