Author Topic: Surfer  (Read 44 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jenkins

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2460
  • Respect: +1482
    • Neon Burrito
Surfer
« on: February 11, 2018, 04:01:44 PM »
0
the only person i know who can make a movie a cult classic before it opens works at New Bev. he's directing the magic of his intuition at Surfer© Teen Confronts Fear.

there isn't a lot of information about this movie but there's some. such as this

Quote
There's a sixty-five second trailer on YouTube, and it takes less that that single minute to illustrate that this film inhabits that James Nguyen/Tommy Wiseau nexus of hubris, narcissism, and ineptitude. It would appear that the film is a sort of vanity project, as it's written/produced/directed by one guy: Douglas Burke - who claims to be a physics professor at USC (on the film's exceedingly '90s-style website), but whose bio at said website betrays a New Agey spirituality. Burke has a role in the film, naturally - but it's really a vehicle for his son, who is the titular "Teen [who] Confronts Fear."

and this

Quote
The most exciting film of the year is coming to Los Angeles for a one week run at the Laemmle Music Hall starting February 16th. Following the 7:20pm screening on Saturday, Feb 17th, the writer / director / star is scheduled for a Q&A. This will be essential insanity.

the movie's website



Quote
Surfing since as young as he can remember,
at the age of 13, Sage is crippled by fear
after suffering a wipeout on a huge wave.
The wave slammed him to the bottom and held him
pinned there without air until he nearly died.


With his whole life still ahead of him
yet now paralyzed by fear,
Sage no longer surfs the waves.
But unable to ignore the mystical and
powerful pull of the ocean,
he fishes in the surf,
and finds more than he bargained for.


This is the story of a teenager who confronts fear . . .



Reelist

  • Shoutbox Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2617
  • Respect: +1017
Re: Surfer
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2018, 07:00:34 PM »
0
I thought the guy second from the right on the poster was Elias Koteas at first, it had me concerned
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

jenkins

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2460
  • Respect: +1482
    • Neon Burrito
Re: Surfer
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2018, 09:27:14 PM »
+1
i'm magnetized by it being a noticeable oddity with a clearly positive message.

WorldForgot

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • 'change your hair, change your life'
  • Respect: +58
    • tweettweet
Re: Surfer
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2018, 01:52:30 PM »
0
i'm magnetized by it being a noticeable oddity with a clearly positive message.

You had me at "works at the new bev" but then I watched the trailer and it seems like one of those hippie culture pseudo-propaganda films from the sixties (is there a proper name for that genre?) and I'm going to see this in NoHo, no doubt

jenkins

  • The Master of Two Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 2460
  • Respect: +1482
    • Neon Burrito
Re: Surfer
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2018, 06:54:29 PM »
+1
he thanks Phil and i think everyone had a good night but oh i don't know about this movie's future --

Simon Barrett, The screenwriter of Blair Witch just watched his first movie in 18 months, so of course he wrote about the experience for Talkhouse:

Opening narration informs us that Surfer had a bad surfing accident and is now scared to surf, so he just fishes all day to be near the ocean. One day while fishing, he sees a man drowning, causing Surfer to cut his fishing line, run out into the water, run back to shore, then run back out into the water and save the man.

The man Surfer rescued turns out to be his father, Jack. Surfer is confused because he was under the impression that his father died “in a war.” Jack confirms that this is accurate, he is dead, and tells Surfer to feel his hand, shouting that it feels like “hard jelly.” He explains that he asked God to help him return to the mortal realm to give his son advice, and yells, “God made me out of squid and electricity.” That matter resolved, Jack gives his son advice in a lengthy oceanside monologue featuring a 12-minute continuous shot, during which Jack proclaims, “There’s always a whale crying somewhere in the ocean,” and at one point screams, “I am living in an iron maiden of pain, boy!” This causes Surfer to shrug uncomfortably and look at the ground, as if vaguely worried that some of his friends from school might walk by and see him. Anyway, the gist of the whole speech is that Surfer needs to confront his fear.

To move things forward, Jack forces Surfer to look at a dead whale, then tells him to go to an address and ask the man there, Banks, for money to go surfing. Once at this location, Surfer finds that it is a secret military hospital where, in a shocking twist, his father is a patient, alive but brain damaged. Banks, a military doctor, tells Surfer that Jack was an elite, government-trained assassin who, on his last mission, swam through shark-infested waters in order to attach a bomb to a boat. However, Jack was caught in the explosion and has been semi-comatose ever since. After a scene of hypnotically repetitive dialogue, Banks gives Surfer money to go surfing and Surfer goes surfing.

Narratively, this is the end of the film; however, we see Surfer surf, go surfing again, then surf some more. Roughly about half of Surfer’s 96 minute runtime is comprised of home movie and vacation footage of Surfer surfing. Sage Burke, to his credit, seems to be quite good at surfing, which is I suppose why his father decided to make a film about that. You will have time to contemplate this extensively.

At the screening I attended, Doug Burke was present for a Q&A, although his son was not. Doug cheerfully noted that Sage “won’t get anywhere near this theater,” and said that his now 16-year-old son told him, “I just can’t handle that right now.” Reportedly 11 years in the making, Surfer was conceived as a silent film, then transformed into something more like a narrative when Doug Burke decided to rekindle his longtime love of method acting.

Other key information delivered at the Q&A was that Doug Burke’s original cut of the film was 6½ hours long, at which time he asked the movie’s editor to help him shorten it, and the score was composed by Doug watching the final edit and humming along to it, then recording his humming and giving it to a composer. We all had many more questions. At one point in the film, Jack tells Surfer that Surfer was saved by the spirit of a sea lion, which is is never referenced again, causing me to genuinely think I imagined it. I asked about this, and Doug Burke’s reply was helpfully recorded for posterity by Jason Eisener in the video below:


 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy