Author Topic: All things Cult Cinema  (Read 4183 times)

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jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2017, 01:46:11 PM »
+2
WHAT.

A MIDNIGHT TAXI ZUM KLO SCREENING AT THE NEW BEV ON DECEMBER 16. THE BEST MOVIE THING TO HAPPEN TO LA FOR THE YEAR, IS MY VOTE.



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In the pioneering classic of German queer cinema, Taxi zum Klo, Frank Ripploh writes, directs and stars in a semi-autobiographical snapshot of pre-AIDS West Berlin. An elementary school teacher by day, Ripploh cruises for sex at night, grading papers in the john while awaiting his next anonymous hook-up. But his compartmentalized routine gets shaken up when he meets a commitment-minded new beau. Frank, fierce, explicit and funny, Taxi zum Klo was notorious at the time of its release. Don’t miss this rare chance to see it back on the big screen in 35mm!


BB

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2017, 11:27:12 PM »
+1
I sought out Taxi zum Klo based on a recommendation from here (possibly you, jenkins) and it truly is astonishing.

wilder

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2017, 03:02:16 PM »
+1


Spectacle Theater's custom trailer for Indonesian director Arizal's American Hunter (1988) is one of my favorite things ever

jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2017, 07:46:30 PM »
0
the history of Japanese cinema is so beautiful to read about via wiki. i crazy want to see a movie about a benshi. how has there not been a benshi movie, that's some major missing out on ripe material.

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During the 1920s and 1930s, Japan was one of the world's two largest producers of motion pictures, along with the United States. Though the country's film industry was among the first to produce both sound and talking features, the full changeover to sound proceeded much more slowly than in the West. It appears that the first Japanese sound film, Reimai (Dawn), was made in 1926 with the De Forest Phonofilm system. Using the sound-on-disc Minatoki system, the leading Nikkatsu studio produced a pair of talkies in 1929: Taii no musume (The Captain's Daughter) and Furusato (Hometown), the latter directed by Kenji Mizoguchi. The rival Shochiku studio began the successful production of sound-on-film talkies in 1931 using a variable-density process called Tsuchibashi. Two years later, however, more than 80 percent of movies made in the country were still silents. Two of the country's leading directors, Mikio Naruse and Yasujirō Ozu, did not make their first sound films until 1935 and 1936, respectively. As late as 1938, over a third of all movies produced in Japan were shot without dialogue.

The enduring popularity of the silent medium in Japanese cinema owed in great part to the tradition of the benshi, a live narrator who performed as accompaniment to a film screening. As director Akira Kurosawa later described, the benshi "not only recounted the plot of the films, they enhanced the emotional content by performing the voices and sound effects and providing evocative descriptions of events and images on the screen.... The most popular narrators were stars in their own right, solely responsible for the patronage of a particular theatre." Film historian Mariann Lewinsky argues,

The end of silent film in the West and in Japan was imposed by the industry and the market, not by any inner need or natural evolution.... Silent cinema was a highly pleasurable and fully mature form.
It didn't lack anything, least in Japan, where there was always the human voice doing the dialogues and the commentary. Sound films were not better, just more economical. As a cinema owner you didn't have to pay the wages of musicians and benshi any more. And a good benshi was a star demanding star payment.

Lew. In. Sky. Lew. In. Sky.

jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2018, 07:02:11 PM »
+1
Mondo Macabro fb posted about their upcoming releases








[The Deserter]




wilder

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2018, 04:54:12 PM »
0
2018 TBD

David DeCoteau's American Rampage (1989) on blu-ray from Massacre Video



A rookie cop with her own way of doing things decides it's time to throw away the rule book when her partner is killed by drug dealers in a war for control of the Los Angeles market. Cinematography by Howard Wexler (Hard Ticket to Hawaii, Malibu Express).


(great looking)
Trailer - Vimeo

wilder

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2018, 04:23:57 PM »
0
May 8, 2018

Andy Sidaris’ Seven (1979) on blu-ray from Kino



A cartel of seven crime bosses unionize and plan to take over the state of Hawaii. Government intelligence agent Drew Sevano (William Smith, Any Which Way You Can) is hired to "handle" the situation however he sees fit. Drew enlists seven old friends to help, creating Sevano's Seven – the Playmate (Susan Kiger, H.O.T.S.), the Black-Belt (Ed Parker, Revenge of the Pink Panther), the Dragster (Christopher Joy, Big Time), the Cowboy (Guich Koock, North Dallas Forty), the Comic (Art Metrano, Police Academy 2), the Professor (Richard LePore, Stacey!) and the Indian (Barbara Leigh, Junior Bonner). Sevano's Seven – death is their way of life! This cult classic was co-written, co-produced and directed by Andy Sidaris (Malibu Express, Hard Ticket to Hawaii) and co-starred Martin Kove (Steele Justice) and Terry Kiser (Weekend at Bernie's).





A 12-film DVD collection of Andy Sidaris’ other movies is available for $8. These are ridiculously entertaining.



Girls, Guns, & G-Strings: The Andy Sidaris Collection - Amazon





jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2018, 08:57:52 PM »
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[moved from the death thread. this is from 2012. this isn't a celebration of Lewis as a murderer, but rather an acknowledgement of the dark paths that people can find themselves traveling down; the utter darkness of this story. because certain aspects of this murder/death will always, always be a mystery, it's different from other types of murders/deaths. because of his association with cinema, Palo Alto in particular, Johnny Lewis belongs to cult cinema.]

Johnny Lewis was an actor on The OC, Sons of Anarchy, and other shows i never watched. he was in the movie Palo Alto, The Runaways, some more, supporting roles. i'm going to summarize his tragic death, which can be read about by clicking his name and going to wikipedia, or this Los Angeles Magazine article, which is commented on by Johnny's father through a practical perspective, and his practical perspective is replied to by another practical perspective.



Johnny Lewis was an actor who considered himself an artist; specifically, a writer. he died within a semi-expensive artist compound in Los Feliz, Los Angeles. the compound was called Writers’ Villa and he lived in the Red Suite: first when he was 23, then when he was 26 and after he'd been released from prison.

between the first and second time he lived in Writers’ Villa, Johnny Lewis went through life difficulties of this sort: he suffered head injuries from a high-speed motorcycle accident; he broke into a condo to protect someone, except the condo was empty, and while in the condo two people arrived, he smashed bottles on their heads, they retaliated and called the cops on him; he served jail time.

he didn't appear to have a drug addiction, and a rather hilarious sidestory relates to people trying to blame anything on pot. in fact there's the story that in rehab Johnny switched to calling himself an alcoholic because that sounded like an actual problem. he didn't appear to be an alcoholic either. his father insists that Jonny had a TBI (traumatic brain injury) which was never treated (Johnny refused), although there are signs that Johnny's personality was becoming more aggressive before his motorcycle injury (and his father blames both the motorcycle accident and the break in and Johnny's jail time, and Johnny's father is a scientologist, which would be a separate story).

no one can quite describe Johnny's overall problem as a person.



pictured: Cathy Davis and her cat. Cathy was the owner of Writers’ Villa.  what happened was, five days after his release from prison, Jonny was living in Writers’ Villa, and he killed both Cathy and her cat, then he either fell or jumped from a second story height onto a concrete driveway.

there's a photo of his blood on the driveway, which is such a sinister photo, an unnecessary photo imo.

the cat was found in the shower, its skull cracked in. Cathy Davis was beaten to death. there was a hammer with dried blood found in Johnny's room.

there are some good guesses about why Johnny was mad at Cathy (because she was mad at him for shutting down the fuse box, which he did because he didn't like lights), but the story of what transpired between them can only be speculated upon. no one guessed this, no one saw it coming.

 

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