Author Topic: All things Cult Cinema  (Read 6001 times)

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jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2018, 12:52:27 PM »
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Anna Biller joins the AGFA advisory board
via American Genre Film Archive
BY JOE ZIEMBA • MARCH 30, 2017



We are beyond honored to welcome Anna Biller, the filmmaker behind VIVA and THE LOVE WITCH, to the AGFA advisory board.

At the American Genre Film Archive (AGFA), we believe that genre films should rule the world. But we can’t make this happen alone. Our advisory board is a coalition of like-minded fans who believe in the importance and preservation of genre films. Together, we ensure that these movies will be available on 35mm until the end of time. Or until the planet explodes. Whichever comes first.

The AGFA advisory board consists of Alamo Drafthouse founders Karrie and Tim League, filmmakers Paul Thomas Anderson and Nicolas Winding Refn, and musician RZA. Today, we’re proud to welcome Anna Biller to the ranks.

“I am thrilled to be included on the board of the American Genre Film Archive,” says Biller, “I believe passionately in continuing the legacy of film, and in preserving some of the great genre films that are such a vital part of our history and culture."

Anna Biller’s work is an inspiration. Meticulously crafting VIVA and THE LOVE WITCH on 35mm, Biller is a breath of fresh air for twenty-first century genre filmmaking. She channels the hyper-stylized aesthetic of Jaques Tati, the surreal melodrama of Nicholas Ray, and the pop-art pulp of Doris Wishman to create movies that feel like nothing else before or since.

For more on Anna Biller and her work, visit: www.lifeofastar.com

November 21, 2017

William Morgan's The Violent Years (1956) on blu-ray from the The American Genre Film Archive and Something Weird Video, from a new 4K restoration.



Paula Parkins is the teenage daughter of wealthy parents whom don't seem to make time for her, so she looks for thrills as the leader of her all-girl gang who steal, rob, and rape young men. Screenplay by Ed Wood. (The label has also confirmed that the film will be paired with Boris Petroff's crime thriller Anatomy of a Psycho).

The Violent Years (1956) - Amazon






jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2018, 12:56:34 PM »
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American Genre Film Archive

their list of titles is actually quite long and there's a lot more i can learn about them. i quoted two of wilder's posts about them. there's also a Lady Street Fighter post in this thread. and a Bat Pussy post exists somewhere i think, i can't find it

Oct 9 they're releasing Ninja Zombie




jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #32 on: September 23, 2018, 05:44:19 PM »
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Keeping the exploitation-film fires burning with Nicolas Winding Refn

I like Nicolas Winding Refn’s films—the ending of The Neon Demon was enough to redeem that otherwise flawed film for me, though that’s a topic for another time—but I’m a huge fan of his ongoing side gig as a film preservationist. He first caught my eye when he bought a collection of film prints by obscure exploitation director Andy Milligan, including the only known copies of several of Milligan’s works, back in 2012. I was delighted when he said he was motivated to buy Milligan’s work by Jimmy McDonough’s (now out of print) biography The Ghastly One: The Sex-Gore Netherworld Of Filmmaker Andy Milligan, which I had just finished shortly before the news broke. I later wrote about attending an exhibit of Refn’s movie-poster collection in 2015, at which I shyly sidled up to the autograph table and told him that I collected movie posters, too.

Refn likes to speak in modest terms about his obsession with vintage exploitation films, saying, for example, that he hadn’t even seen most of the movies in his art book The Act Of Seeing. But the care and attention to detail with which he restores these films and re-presents them to the public betrays his affection for the material, an affection that seems at least partially driven by sympathy for the filmmakers whose works end up in landfills. As he told The New York Times at the end of July, “A lot of the films [had] maybe just two prints existing—once they were gone, there would be nothing. All the hard work in making a film and then they would be lost, which would be really sad.” I identify with that sense of duty, as anyone who has lived with me, and therefore has had to deal with the crates and crates of weird old VHS tapes I drag with me to every new apartment, can attest.



So perhaps it was a foregone conclusion that I would be really into Refn’s new preservation venture, byNWR, a highly curated—and free, if you’re watching on a computer—streaming service that was announced last October and has been slowly rolling out new content ever since. byNWR, which describes itself as “an unadulterated cultural expressway of the arts,” combines the best attributes of two other speciality streaming services: the curated selection of Shudder, and the excellent supplemental features of FilmStruck.

The content on byNWR is truly unique: These are films in danger of being lost forever, not well-known cult classics. And frankly, they’re not to everyone’s taste. They’re all crudely made, many of them have pacing issues, and some are downright offensive to contemporary sensibilities. (This is particularly true of the “hicksploitation” films featured on the site.) If you stumbled on one of them on some bizarre late-night cable channel, you’d probably change the channel after a couple of minutes. But byNWR puts them in context, not only historically, but also artistically, revealing their true value as fascinating documents of their respective eras and misunderstood works of outsider art.

Titles are released in quarterly collections, each with a new film released monthly. Last fall came the “Regional Renegades” collection, featuring the films The Nest Of The Cuckoo Birds (1965), Shanty Tramp (1967), and Hot Thrills And Warm Chills (1967). I watched the latter, a collection of vignettes loosely strung together by a thin plot about a gang of female jewel thieves plotting a heist during Mardi Gras. You never actually see the heist, but you do get a lot of footage of the French Quarter in the mid-’60s, as well as burlesque dancers with gloriously caked-on eye makeup and sky-high hairdos performing their signature routines. Materials accompanying the film include extensive interviews with the four self-proclaimed “broads” who make up the core ensemble—one even includes some of her poetry!—as well as essays from various authors about regional cinema, the music and culture of New Orleans, and the art and business of exotic dance.

This month launched a new, slightly more highbrow series called “Missing Links,” which opened with a title I had heard of before: Night Tide, a 1961 magical-realist horror-romance from prolific ’60s and ’70s B-movie director Curtis Harrington. (He also did a pair of Grande Dame Guignol movies, Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? with Shelley Winters, and What’s The Matter With Helen? with Debbie Reynolds, in the early ’70s.) The film is notable not only because it features a very young Dennis Hopper, but also as a document of the early ’60s L.A. beatnik subculture (there is a lot of bongo drumming in this movie) and as a bridge between ’50s drive-in cinema and the then-nascent American independent film movement. The plot recalls a gender-swapped The Shape Of Water, as lovestruck sailor Johnny Drake (Hopper) falls in love with reluctant mermaid Mora (Linda Lawson) on the Santa Monica pier; the pace undeniably drags, but the film is hypnotic and worth a watch anyway.



Next month’s looking to be a good one on byNWR, as the service adds the second film in its “Missing Links” series: If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do? (1971), an infamous Christian scare film from holy-rolling huckster Ron Ormond that contains an absolutely gobsmacking scene where a Communist gets a bunch of kids to renounce Jesus and embrace Fidel Castro by giving them candy. (It’s embedded above.) I’ve seen it, and can attest that it’s a must-see for those who watch Pure Flix films ironically. After that comes November’s selection, Spring Night, Summer Night (1967), an obscure art film shot on location in Appalachian Ohio that was re-edited for maximum sleaze and released under various titles to capitalize on its incestuous theme. In its original form, however, it’s reportedly more Killer Of Sheep than Common Law Cabin. I’m looking forward to it.

byNWR is now up and running on its own website. It isn’t currently available in its free form as an app for Roku et al, but if you prefer to watch the films on a TV (and don’t have one of these also-recommended cables that essentially turns your TV into an external monitor), they also stream on MUBI as they are released

jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #33 on: September 27, 2018, 04:11:49 PM »
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Patty Mayo has 3,755,420 subscribers on his youtube channel about being a bounty hunter.

this is his bio:
Quote
Patrick Thomas Tarmey, better known online as Patty Mayo, is an American entrepreneur and YouTube prankster-turned-vlogger best known for his bounty hunting series profession and stringing vlogs.

He is the former owner of Boston businesses Paramotor Tours, Abington Airsoft and Abington Zombie Apocolypse, under the name Patrick Tarmey. These were all sold when he moved to CA.

Now living in Burbank, CA, he owns his own production company - which plays a large part in creating his videos.

History

Early days
Patrick Thomas joined YouTube on November 12, 2013 and spent the following two years producing roughly a dozen reasonably popular prank videos. Beginning to experience significant monetization issues affecting his earnings, Thomas elected to pursue work as a bail bondsman agent or "bounty hunter," a profession he describes as "one of the first jobs as an adult I ever had..." Branding the initiative as the "Southland Bounty Hunters" in reference to the geographic locale of southern California in which he works, he began documenting his experiences as a bondsman.

Rise in viewership
Bringing along his longtime girlfriend Kayla as his initial bond agent partner and camerawoman, Thomas began producing 10-20 minute on-the-job vlogs, detailing the work involved in finding and apprehending wanted fugitives. Due in part to the exotic nature of his profession and the high level of filming and editing accompanying each video, his viewcount skyrocketed through the summer months of 2017.

In early June of 2017, Thomas acquired a new, genuie bounty hunting partner in the form of fellow YouTuber DeMar "Bounty Hunter D." Their cutting wit and chemistry, in addition to their decision to take on more potentially dangerous fugitives, led to an increase in viewership through the latter part of the summer, during which time Thomas hit one million subscribers. The duo briefly parted ways after an altercation in their personal lives but publicly reunited and buried the hatchet in November of 2017.

Current events
Thomas' video release levels reduced significantly in the latter half of November for several reasons. Due to a reappearing illness related to a previously sustained head injury that nearly cost him his life, Thomas was placed on light duty by his bail company employer to provide him time to recover. Secondly, he and Kayla had simultaneously begun production of a live show related to their part-time work as stringers, documenting their attempts to capture footage of dangerous events and natural disasters in California.

Equipment
As a legally-sanctioned bondsman, Thomas is licensed to carry firearms in the state of California. In addition to his 9mm handgun, he also carries a taser, tactical and chain handcuff variations, assorted flashlights and other such items. He generally appears in videos wearing Southland Bounty Hunters clothing merchandise, augmented through the inclusion of various levels of body armor sporting his badge and clearly notating his profession.

Vehicle-wise, Thomas has been known to drive both a blacked-out Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor equipped with strobe lights and a spotlight, as well as a black Dodge truck equipped with a video communications/surveillance suite in lieu of a flatbed. Though initially he did not possess a license to run his CVPI's ELS lights, it is believed that he has since acquired this license, though as of December 2017, this remains speculation.

Sponsors
Since his early days, Thomas has been sponsored by Edubirdie.com, a company whose support Thomas credits as being invaluable for funding the switch from prank videos to more serious bounty hunting videos during the preceding YouTube monitization issues. He has also received smaller sponsorships from companies like EvoGimbals who occasionally supply him with gear.

Personal life
Thomas's longtime girlfriend Kayla plays a significant role in the channel's operation; in addition to being Patrick's first bounty hunting partner, she currently serves as the main camerawoman of the operation, and assists in major behind-the-scenes administrative work necessary to locate and apprehend fugitives.

Thomas also runs a second channel with more intimate content related to his personal life called "Extra Mayo". Though much of the content is related to his life with his girlfriend Kayla, members of Thomas' family occasionally make cameo appearances.

i heard about him impersonally over the internet

jenkins

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Re: All things Cult Cinema
« Reply #34 on: October 18, 2018, 02:19:33 AM »
+1
sending The Shaggs movie straight to cult. they're just so remarkable. it seems kind of embarrassing i've never listened to them. seems even without realizing it i've heard about them. Philosophy of the World has the golden moment where it's somehow the perfect title. it's fair to say many other albums would be more serious with the title. their backstory is next level

Quote
The conceptual beginning of The Shaggs came from Austin Wiggin's mother who, when her son was young, had predicted during a palmreading that he would marry a strawberry blonde woman, that he would have two sons after she had died, and that his daughters would form a popular music group. The first two predictions proved accurate, so Austin set about making the third come true as well. Austin withdrew his daughters from school, bought them instruments, and arranged for them to receive music and vocal lessons. The Wiggin sisters themselves never planned to become a music group, but as Dot later said, "[Austin] was something of a disciplinarian. He was stubborn and he could be temperamental. He directed. We obeyed. Or did our best." Austin named The Shaggs after the then-popular shag hairstyle and as a reference to shaggy dogs. In 1968, Austin arranged for the girls to play a regular Saturday night gig at the Fremont, New Hampshire Town Hall.

and within all this it's legitimate cult nerdery that's carried them this far. that's always so beautiful.

this song finalized my reverence



it's so wrong but it's so right and you just couldn't pull it off if you wanted to


 

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