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Jeremy Blackman · 84 · 19897

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Sleepless

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Reply #75 on: November 07, 2019, 09:53:41 AM
There is zero chance they already have the funding for this movie secured, and probably less than 5% chance their little gambit will allow them to get it. If this actually comes to pass, I'll be genuinely shocked.

My second thought was "won't it actually cost more to have a CG James Dean than casting literally any willing actor?"
He held on. The dolphin and all the rest of its pod turned and swam out to sea, and still he held on. This is it, he thought. Then he remembered that they were air-breathers too. It was going to be all right.


WorldForgot

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Reply #76 on: November 07, 2019, 11:33:45 AM
There is zero chance they already have the funding for this movie secured, and probably less than 5% chance their little gambit will allow them to get it. If this actually comes to pass, I'll be genuinely shocked.

My second thought was "won't it actually cost more to have a CG James Dean than casting literally any willing actor?"

And what kind of production period does that take?
Considering The Irishman and Disney, with all their resources, are hard-pressed to pull off CGI acting even when they've got the living actor alive for performance capture.


jenkins

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Reply #77 on: November 07, 2019, 03:37:13 PM

what the fuck is Chris going to do when robots do indeed begin to paint and make music. the idea of a robot writer intimidates me far more than a digital recreation of an actual person


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Reply #78 on: November 09, 2019, 01:34:06 PM
I'm so many people.


jenkins

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Reply #79 on: November 12, 2019, 07:08:09 PM
Team Behind Digital James Dean Forms New Company to Resurrect Other Legends

The team that helped resurrect James Dean with visual effects for an upcoming Vietnam war movie isnt done creating digital versions of famous actors and other celebrities: Intellectual property licensing specialist CMG Worldwide has merged with immersive content creation studio Observe Media to form Worldwide XR, a new company that aims to bring digital humans to traditional film as well as augmented and virtual reality.

Worldwide XR holds and represents the rights for more than 400 celebrities, athletes and sports teams. In addition to James Dean, it will also enable creators to bring back stars like Bettie Page, Burt Reynolds and Andre The Giant, sports legends like Lou Gehrig, and artists like Maya Angelou.

Influencers will come and go, but legends will never die, said Worldwide XR CEO Travis Cloyd. CMG Worldwide CEO Mark Roesler is joining the new company as chairman and co-founder.

Worldwide XR wants to not only license celebrities likenesses, but also help creatives make use of existing assets as they look to transform them to digital humans. The way this is done depends on both individual projects as well as the recognizability of each celebrity, explained Cloyd. In some cases, creatives may rely solely on computer-generated imagery based on existing photos and films, while other projects may require combining existing assets with the work of look-alike actors.

When news broke last week that the upcoming Vietnam War era drama Finding Jack would feature a digitally-recreated James Dean, not everyone was happy. Actor Chris Evans slammed the move as awful in a tweet, saying: Maybe we can get a computer to paint us a new Picasso. Or write a couple new John Lennon tunes. The complete lack of understanding here is shameful. Others who criticized the unusual casting included Zelda Williams, Elijah Wood and Dylan Sprouse.

Its disruptive, acknowledged Cloyd. Some people dislike it. However, he argued that the emergence of digital humans was inevitable, and promised that his company would vet any potential partners to make sure that they would do the celebrity in question justice. We will do our due diligence, he said.

Cloyd added that he was most excited about the potential to resurrect celebrities in augmented and virtual reality, where they could more directly interact with the viewer. And he suggested that we may get to see Dean even beyond the Vietnam war movie. There is a lot more to come for James Dean, he said. Think of it as James Dean 2.0.


WorldForgot

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Reply #80 on: November 12, 2019, 07:35:10 PM
Team Behind Digital James Dean Forms New Company to Resurrect Other Legends
However, he argued that the emergence of digital humans was inevitable, and promised that his company would vet any potential partners to make sure that they would do the celebrity in question justice. We will do our due diligence, he said.

 Think of it as James Dean 2.0.

Humans die. "Digital Humans" doesn't make sense. Digital Persona, perhaps?


jenkins

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Reply #81 on: November 27, 2019, 01:09:24 AM
the idea of a robot writer intimidates me far more

which is a relatable component in this Grimes v Zola Jesus thing my friend WF first told me about. in some interview Grimes mentioned robot musicians and Zola Jesus flipped out because this idea threatens our sense of identity as special creatures in this universe. now somebody went on about it like this:


and somehow this idea of "interdependent music" softened Zola Jesus

but, interdependent writing. grammarly in a creative capacity. my god. still going with my god in reference to this specific topic


WorldForgot

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Reply #82 on: January 23, 2020, 06:22:38 PM
Don't know which thread to put this piece in (JB, wilder, feel free to move this to a more apropos thread), but a great Interview/Retrospective from last year w/ Julie Dash, Matty Rich, Darnell Martin, Ernest Dickerson, Leslie Harris and Theodore Witcher and the NYT:

‘They Set Us Up to Fail’: Black Directors of the ’90s Speak Out
Quote
What other kinds of things did you hear?

HARRIS I went to an interview and someone said to me: “You don’t look like a filmmaker. What are you doing here?”

MATTY RICH (“Straight Out of Brooklyn”) Wow.

ERNEST DICKERSON (“Juice”) What does a filmmaker look like?

DASH After “Daughters,” I tried to get representation at the Gersh Agency in New York. They told me I didn’t have a future. They saw no future for me as a black woman director. What were they going to do with me?

DICKERSON There used to be a time where you go after an agency, and they would always tell the story, “We already got our black filmmakers.”

MARTIN And you had to do what they wanted you to do, too, because you were their black filmmaker. It was like, “This is the film, you’ve got to do it.” It was like, “I’m not feeling it.” but you had to do it.

When did you sense that the well was drying up?

RICH I was told that I was in director’s jail. Director’s jail is if your film doesn’t make X amount of money, then it’s going to be hard for you to get another movie financed. [Rich’s 1994 follow-up, “The Inkwell,” earned just under its reported budget of $8 million theatrically.]

DICKERSON I’ve been there.

RICH They told me the only way out of director’s jail is that you have to write your way out of it. So I wrote a Tupac Shakur project for HBO, and I came onboard to write “Subway Scholar” at Showtime for Whitney Houston. But I got frustrated because I had a lot of things stuck in development. I met the C.E.O. of Ubisoft, a gaming company in Paris, and they needed some help on a game [“187: Ride or Die”] that they were about to release. I wound up living there for two years as the creative director and art director. That was kind of my new outlet for storytelling without Hollywood. It felt like everyone had wanted me to make another urban drama, instead of a family-oriented, lighthearted story like “The Inkwell.”

DICKERSON I made a movie called “Bulletproof,” with Damon Wayans and Adam Sandler. Working on that film was the only time I ever got mad enough to punch a hole in the editing room wall. It was supposed to be a raunchy, R-rated comedy slanted more for an adult audience. But I could see we had trouble when they were giving out tickets to 15- to 16-year-old kids at the first preview. Afterward, I had to really sanitize the relationships. It meant savaging the movie.

It still opened at No. 1, but I got the worst reviews of my career. I was criticized for not having everything I was told to take out. I had several projects lined up — I had been developing “Blade,” with Wesley Snipes. The whole idea of where “Blade” went was mine. But the producers looked to “Bulletproof” and thought I had completely lost my street cred. After that, nobody would touch me. I think I’m still in jail, in a way, because I’m doing television. [Dickerson — like many of his peers, including Martin and Dash — has found work on the small screen, with credits on “The Wire” and “The Walking Dead.”] I consider myself a filmmaker who’s working in television.


Jeremy Blackman

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Reply #83 on: February 13, 2020, 10:55:46 PM
Early footage from the new Batman film:


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